Feature for feature, Hubzilla is the best decentralized, open source competitor to Facebook. Compatibility with the Diaspora, OStatus (includes Mastodon), & ActivityPub (includes NextCloud) protocols allows it to communicate with nearly every other existing. I am happy that after he created Friendica, Mike Macgirvin & friends have continued to push forward by creating and developing Hubzilla. themagician • Mar 2018 • 1 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
I don’t expect to move over to either of these as my main social network, but Twitter’s latest waves of jack-assery has kickstarted the conversation again. There are a few problems with these other services, but the main thing is that they just haven’t managed to get enough people to stick around and use them for long. People tend to try them and bounce off them pretty quickly. I know I have bounced off each of them numerous times.
While there isn't a true Facebook alternative out there, you're not really looking for that anyway. You're ready for something different—a social network platform where everybody knows your name and you won't get trolled for posting. The following social media apps promise features such as less ad targeting, less fake news, and more security, so users can share updates, read the headlines, and communicate with more confidence in their security and privacy.
A press release about the change, which was just implemented at the end of September, reads that this is “a software upgrade that will take the Steem blockchain from its current bandwidth system to a new system based on Resource Credits, or RCs. This upgrade will enable Steem DApps to create free accounts, making it easier than ever to onboard new users and cementing Steem’s lead as the blockchain with the lowest barriers-to-entry… Hardfork 20 also improves user experiences on Steem by enabling unlimited post editing on steemit.com, allowing curators to vote on a post within 15 minutes of it being published (a change from 30 minutes) and putting more rewards back in the hands of curators by removing an unfair advantage that self-voting authors had.”
Honestly! I was thinking of leaving Twitter but what’s really the alternative? I get the news faster there than anywhere else; I have been able to pretty much choose the information I get on my timeline ( which is all in one place at the same time if I want to see it); I can block out the deplorables (yeah, I said it!)...so what is a REAL alternative? Although I would leave in a heartbeat because of the continued support of Alex Jones and his ilk...and go to what?
It was launched recently in year 2016 but its interactive features have made it popular enough among youngsters. If you have used Muscial.ly app then Live.ly can appear like a potential competitor to that. It allows users to broadcast memorable moments from their life and people can also watch live streams at any corner of world. When you like some live streams then you can simply send “loves” to the broadcaster and update comments. It also allow users to send gift points to each other and these gift points can be bought be spending real money. You will definitely love the Daily Leaderboard feature of Live.ly that assists in easy channel shorting as per number of total “Loves” received b the broadcaster. Anyone can browse for specific categories of streams to enjoy as per mood. Live.ly also gives opportunity to initiate search for friends by using their contact numbers or usernames.
Twitter’s key advantage for me is that it just feels like the place everyone is talking. Basically everyone you want to hear from, whether they be celebrities, athletes, politicians, actors, writers, or regular old people, they’re almost certainly on Twitter. Not only are they there, but they’re active and use it as a one-stop-shop for talking about everything they’re doing. If you’re not on Twitter, you’re cutting out a main place things are announced and talked about.

Thanks to its distributed design and because no person owns it, it’s away from any kind of advertisement and corporate interference. After making an account, you retain the ownership of your personal data. It’s also better than Facebook for people who wish to hide their real identity as it allows pseudonyms. You can use hashtags, mentions, text formatting, etc.

You may not realize this, but MySpace still exists and you can still create an account there. In fact, some people’s old MySpace accounts are still there, too. It’s not really clear if anyone’s trying MySpace again after the Facebook issues — they may be gone for good. But it might be worth checking out for nostalgia’s sake at the very least. In June, The Guardian did a story about people who still enjoy using MySpace. However, one dedicated user did say that most profiles on MySpace are abandoned. Meredith Corporation is selling the media brand Time to Salesforce’s founders, Marc and Lynne Benioff. Meredith also owns Viant, which it’s looking into selling. Since Viant owns MySpace, it’s anyone’s guess what will happen to MySpace next.
Instagram was launched back in 2010 to accommodate the photo sharing maniacs on the internet. It has set the trend to share beautiful personal and professional photos on the internet and build a following around it. What launched as a simple application to attach relatively low-resolution images has today become the platform of choice for capitalizing, branding and advertising by optimizing photo posts.
At the end of the last year, the platform has increased the number of characters that can be used in a post, but this move did almost nothing to restore Twitter's former glory. Celebrities getting caught up in Twitter wars, fake accounts and ultra-right-wing supporters have all contributed to the current state of affairs on Twitter. Most people simply decide to use another social network that doesn't have the limitations imposed by a misguided company management and users that lack respect for everyone's right to free speech.
The world’s most popular online chatting app has also introduced services for businesses to automate their accounts on WhatsApp to interact one-on-one with their customers. The one privacy issue with WhatsApp is its method to sign up which involves the phone number and its default setting to make the phone number public is a bit of a concern too. There is also a limitation of having just one account per mobile number which might be an issue with businesses which would like a unified experience on the App. But apart from this, the platform is well-optimized for direct messaging and group chatting.
Here’s what Mastodon is: an open-source, community-run microblogging website. It lets you post “toots,” and you can “boost” other users’ posts. It’s mostly like Twitter, but instead of living in one place, the social network lives in different chunks, called “instances,” each with its own rules and administrators. That’s what makes up a “federation,” and it protects the integrity of the service—there is no single, central server. So, if one instance stops paying for their internet or forgets to re-up their URL, the rest are unharmed in their semi-permeable silos.

Path is an app-based platform that doesn’t work with desktop browsers, so if you’re looking for something that works with both, then this won’t be right for you. This app is designed for working with smaller, more interpersonal groups rather than hundreds and hundreds of friends. Users share updates, photos, media they’re using, books, movies, and shopping purchases.
Part of Vero’s appeal to Facebook deleters is its determination to be ad-free. It is planning instead to start charging a small annual subscription at some point – although the app has already experienced its own backlash. In February, founder Ayman Hariri was criticised over past associations with a company that was the subject of allegations concerning employee conditions. The fact that Vero has several Russian developers has also become a talking point.
Photographer Cole Barash likes to think of images in sequences. Whether he’s editing his work for a book, a zine or a gallery exhibition, he says, “I typically think in a conversation of images. It’s about the relationship of one image to another, communicating an idea or message.” He has carried those same principles to social media. When he posts...
Tinfoil is a little bit older, but many people still swear by it. Tinfoil’s claim to fame is being a Facebook app that doesn’t ask for any of your permissions, hence the name. It’s a web-wrapper like many of these. Thus, most of its features are similar to the web version. The update schedule is a tad unpredictable. It's completely free with no ads and no in-app purchases. That makes it hard to complain too much.

Upvote! If ClickUp implements an effective chat function, just like Slack, then I am going to ditch Slack entirely and migrate my team to ClickUp once and for all. Slack is a simple idea (compared to something like Git), but has achieved tremendous success because it fulfills an essential and important need for running any kinds of businesses or organizations. Of course, its sophistication makes it a better tool than alternative solutions like whatsapp. But it is still a pain in the neck to go back and forth between Slack and ClickUp or another management tool. I seriously feel that ClickUp has the potential to compete with Slack. I also feel the philosophy of the ClickUp is compatible with this model of combining communication with project management. You care about UX, and not just what you could make and sell. From a user's perspective, I'd like to have a tool where I could talk to my team members and manage projects/tasks at the same time.
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