While deleting Facebook might feel like a step in a more private direction, it's ultimately not going to do much to change the online digital economy that profits by collecting your personal information and selling it to data brokers. Facebook collects arguably the most private information, but plenty of other popular social networking apps like Snapchat and Twitter collect your data too. That's their entire business model: When you're not paying for a product, you are the product. Even your internet-service provider is likely collecting your personal information. In fact, through its expansive ad network, Facebook even collects info from people who aren't even on the platform.
Pros & Cons Using Twitter For eLearning: What eLearning professionals should know! 8 pros and 6 cons on How To Use Twitter For eLearning!advantage using twitterpros and cons of trump using twitterbenefits of twitter in educationpros and cons of twitter for businessnegatives of twitterteachers using twitter in the classroomPeople also search for ...
This platform is aiming to be the best place to show your work on your smartphone either for fun or for business, and it’s doing a pretty good job of achieving this. You can’t create galleries directly on the app, but what you can do is create them ahead of time on your computer and then have them in your pocket ready for whenever you need to show off your work.
Instagram uses ads as one of the main sources of monetization, which displays promotional posts between regular posts. The Stories feature has been monetized too. It also has ‘Shop Now’ feature that redirects the users straight to the online stores. The App is available for both iOS and Android but doesn’t have a featured website, because it’s 2018 and it is fine to be a mobile-only platform.
Twittelator Neue is pure eye candy. There's a new wave of apps that are trying out new layering effects and physics, new animations and interactions. Twittelator Neue is one of those leading the way. This is not Apple's Twitter client. It's not flat and utilitarian like Mail or overly skeumorphic like Find my Friends. It's glossy, it's polished, it's fresh, and it's refreshing.
Twitter, the platform I once loved, has turned into a terrible place. It's become a way to pervert the political discourse, to enable trolls, and to fuel the spread of conspiracy theories. And that's just lately. Seeing people I generally like and agree with subtweeting and attacking others—on top of the world's perpetually bleak news—has begun to gnaw away at my mental health and spiritual wellbeing. It simply isn't what I signed up for.
Tinfoil is a little bit older, but many people still swear by it. Tinfoil’s claim to fame is being a Facebook app that doesn’t ask for any of your permissions, hence the name. It’s a web-wrapper like many of these. Thus, most of its features are similar to the web version. The update schedule is a tad unpredictable. It's completely free with no ads and no in-app purchases. That makes it hard to complain too much.
Unlike Twitter, Instagram doesn’t have a word limit on its posts, although the users insist that there is a cap after 2,200 characters, which is relatively long anyway. Instagram allows three types of posts: picture, video, and GIF. It also features hashtags and allows up to 30 hashtags on a single post. There is a Direct Message facility to send texts, photos, videos, GIFs and stickers to anyone on the platform, even Beyonce. Addition to that, it has Stories, which is a status update with photos and videos with 24 hours of life, after which they are automatically deleted.
Upvote! If ClickUp implements an effective chat function, just like Slack, then I am going to ditch Slack entirely and migrate my team to ClickUp once and for all. Slack is a simple idea (compared to something like Git), but has achieved tremendous success because it fulfills an essential and important need for running any kinds of businesses or organizations. Of course, its sophistication makes it a better tool than alternative solutions like whatsapp. But it is still a pain in the neck to go back and forth between Slack and ClickUp or another management tool. I seriously feel that ClickUp has the potential to compete with Slack. I also feel the philosophy of the ClickUp is compatible with this model of combining communication with project management. You care about UX, and not just what you could make and sell. From a user's perspective, I'd like to have a tool where I could talk to my team members and manage projects/tasks at the same time.
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