When it comes to searching for additional sources of income to finance the project, Ello’s creators are rather creative: they have plans to begin generating revenue through user transactions carried out on their network – so by taking a commission on CD sales, for example. One of Ello’s principles is that its users aren’t obliged to use their real names, which had previously been the case at Facebook and caused outrage. When it first started out, Ello was a closed network, only accessible through an invitation to join from a registered user. This has since been relaxed, and today Ello is available for all interested parties. Critics of the site claim that Ello can’t really be considered a true Facebook alternative because it’s lacking many of the basic functions required to compete. For example, private communication between users via a chat box function is currently not possible. Ello’s focus instead is on high-quality content for all to see, making it an excellent environment for artists and photographers. Users from creative backgrounds are often attracted by Ello’s simple, minimalistic design, leaving lots of space for user posts to shine.

[AGENDA] Apply to the School for Transnational Activism and participate in a series of 3 workshops in Warsaw, Rijeka and Palermo #migrantsrights #citizenship #feminism #gender #climatejustice #data and #digitalrights https://www.citizensforeurope.eu/agenda/call-for-applications-school-of-transnational-activism … via @EuroAlter Deadline 22 April!pic.twitter.com/MSnUOILZzo
Tweetbot is different. It’s innovative and refreshing. Tweetbot isn’t an app you use, it’s one you interact with. Everything has an animation, a sound, a beautiful interface. And true to Tapbots’ style, the sounds are subtle and pleasant – enriching the experience. For those who are suckers for design, innovation, and dare I say, personality, Tweetbot will rock your world.
I know that personally, I’m not too jazzed about the learning curve of some of these new options and prefer the more familiar layouts of Real.Video (Brighteon), MeWe, and Gab. But honestly, people on social media can just be so horrible that Selco Begovic and I started an old-fashioned forum that is a throw-back to the 90s/early 2000s. I like forums because they’re familiar, comfortable, and they draw likeminded people together.
We love the clean and simple layout and the back to basics concept. There are no hashtags and it’s not about collecting heart-shaped likes: the focus is purely on sharing beautiful work with people who appreciate photography. The curated collections are a great place to find inspiration for your next shoot, and 500px actively encourage open and honest feedback with the aim of helping users improve their work. These collections are put together by fellow photographers and are broken down into categories such as people and nature, so you can delve into what you love without sifting through the rest.
Now that Mark Zuckerberg controls your hipster, vintage-inspired photos that you took with Instagram, you might be feeling weighed down with the fear that your favorite photography app will see some major changes. I cried for a few minutes, then I realized that I never used Instagram to edit photos because its filters were actually very limited and pretty crappy. There’s tons of better apps out there. If for whatever reason you’re scared to stick with the new Instagram controlled by Facebook, there are plenty of alternatives to Instagram… and in many ways most of them are better. Take a look at these five awesome Instagram alternatives.
Eyeem is the fastest growing photography sharing sites by the four members (Florian Meissner, Ramzi Rizk, Gen Sadakane, Lorenz Aschoff) launched in 2010 to provide a platform to the internet users to upload and publish their photos to get discovered by the relevant audience.  There is nothing unique about the Eyeem, it works same as the other popular images hosting site do.

Here's the thing—putting aside the fact that some very vocal iOS users are very upset that their precious app has descended to the likes of Android users (let's be clear, some iOS users, not all - most people understand that the device you use, OS you prefer, or browser you surf with is not who you are) and the social commentary the whole depressing fiasco gives us, the truth is that while Instagram has great hype, slick sex appeal, and a bolted-on social aspect, it doesn't do anything that a half-dozen other apps for iOS and Android don't do. In fact, some of those Android apps do it just as well or better.
I'm going to end this piece by stating that I love Instagram. It is where all my clients are on a daily basis, I get to engage with new audiences, connect with new creatives, and often scroll till my thumb gets numb. But Instagram is also a victim of it's own success. The bombardment of bots (which will hopefully slow down) that auto-comment, limited search engine, and increase in sponsored posts is spoiling the broth. I've given five alternatives above that each bring something different to the party, and may create new avenues of interest and creative expression to pursue in this digital, mobile age. Please share any of your own alternatives below.
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Everyone know Twitter! This platform has gained enough popularity among users throughout the world. It allows people to create feeds with specific character limit that goes up to 140 characters. Within last few years, Twitter developers have updated so many interesting features to this network and today people love it’s all new version with feature rich design. But at the same time, many people hate this site just because its presence is somewhat same as that of Facebook. One recent update to Twitter was related to its poll creation abilities and it received great response from users. Besides the simple twitter card integration service, Twitter also allows users to share many short duration multimedia files using tweets. This platform is also popular for contests that are launched for the common people and they can participate with creative images, videos etc. The one who gets higher ranking is able to receive rewards from contest organizer.
Traditional e-mail is still a big part of online communication for private and for business use, with many users typically opting for Outlook as their e-mail client. For PC users, Microsoft is practically an essential, but many private users and small businesses often look for alternatives. Luckily, there is a great number of free e-mail programs available for anyone put off by Outlook’s licensing...
Snapchat will be hoping to pick up some Facebook refuseniks in the coming weeks, especially since a recent (controversial) redesign of its app to make it less confusing for new users. Last year saw plenty of speculation that Snapchat was losing customers to Instagram in particular, although for the moment there is no sense yet that the flow is reversing following the Cambridge Analytica revelations.
Last year, after Twitter began moving away from a purely chronological feed, Rochko began building the back end for what would become Mastodon. Instead of building a unified service, Rochko envisioned something more like email, or RSS: a distributed system that lets you send public messages to anyone who follows you on the service. Anyone can create a server and host their own instance of Mastodon, and Mastodon works in the background to connect them. (source)
Ello launched back in 2014 with quite a stir in the US as it was about the time when Facebook changed its policy on names of its members, where they had to use their proper legal name. Its popularity grew as Ello presented itself to the world as a “Facebook killer social network” which doesn’t push ads down its users’ throats and doesn’t sell peoples’ information and data to 3rd parties.
Vero lets you share photos and video just like Instagram, plus it lets you talk about music, movies or books you like or hate. Though Vero has been around since 2015, its popularity surged in recent days, thanks in part to sudden, word-of-mouth interest from the cosplay community — comic book fans who like to dress up as characters. That interest then spread to other online groups.
I’m having a similar problem with Facebook. I have an assistant who was supposed to conduct a Facebook campaign for me; she still hasn’t started but in the meantime, she told me she couldn’t conduct the campaign unless I gave her my Facebook log-in info., which to my sorrow I gave to her. Now, I can’t get into my Facebook account. They’ve asked for documents to prove who I am and, like you, I don’t like the invasion of privacy. They have a second level of documents that they will supposedly accept, such as library cards, professional membership cards, and health insurance cards which don’t have the kind of personal information that I am unwilling to share. When I sent them these, they e-mailed me to say I hadn’t sent the kinds of documents they require (untrue) and when I e-mailed them in response, well, they have not responded to me and I am still locked out of my account. BIG BUMMER. I also don’t like the uses that Facebook has allowed, such as influencing elections and recently, allowing the U.S. government to pursue certain types of suspected mis-deeds through Facebook. When/if I can get back in, I am very seriously considering deleting my Facebook account and finding an alternative.
Instagram, owned by Facebook has grown over the past few years by leaps and bounds. It’s an all round social network, as it lets you upload photos, short videos and even exchange texts with others. The great thing is you can set Instagram to post your updates on your Facebook, Twitter and other profiles as well. Thanks to Instagram’s popularity, there has been a rise in various similar apps, which you can check out.
Plenty of apps will take your photos, from Apple iCloud to Dropbox to Microsoft OneDrive, but at the moment Google Photos makes most sense for most people—not least because you can store an unlimited number of photos and videos if you let it shrink your pictures down to 16 megapixels and your clips down to 1080p (you can also pay to have everything kept at full resolution).
Here's the thing—putting aside the fact that some very vocal iOS users are very upset that their precious app has descended to the likes of Android users (let's be clear, some iOS users, not all - most people understand that the device you use, OS you prefer, or browser you surf with is not who you are) and the social commentary the whole depressing fiasco gives us, the truth is that while Instagram has great hype, slick sex appeal, and a bolted-on social aspect, it doesn't do anything that a half-dozen other apps for iOS and Android don't do. In fact, some of those Android apps do it just as well or better.

Why not have a standalone chat feature that integrates well with slack? Not sure how do-able that would be but it would be cool if you could send slack messages right from the Clickup chat session and vise versa -- sort of have them synconized. That way non-slack users still have built in chat and slack users can continue to use slack but the relevant message stream would be viewable from within the clickup chat feature. Not sure if it's possible ... maybe I'm dreaming ...

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