Upvote! If ClickUp implements an effective chat function, just like Slack, then I am going to ditch Slack entirely and migrate my team to ClickUp once and for all. Slack is a simple idea (compared to something like Git), but has achieved tremendous success because it fulfills an essential and important need for running any kinds of businesses or organizations. Of course, its sophistication makes it a better tool than alternative solutions like whatsapp. But it is still a pain in the neck to go back and forth between Slack and ClickUp or another management tool. I seriously feel that ClickUp has the potential to compete with Slack. I also feel the philosophy of the ClickUp is compatible with this model of combining communication with project management. You care about UX, and not just what you could make and sell. From a user's perspective, I'd like to have a tool where I could talk to my team members and manage projects/tasks at the same time.
Facebook kind of took the internet world by storm when it went global in 2006 and it is arguably the biggest social network now. We all have a Facebook account and it would be lying if anyone said they haven’t had one ever. Facebook has been loved so much by people and it continues to add new features in a bid to remain at the top of the social network world. But there are times when we get a little saturated by Facebook and want a new fresh alternative. Although the truth is, there are no worthy Facebook alternatives.

For my money, at least, I'd much rather you focus on solving the other ten zillion things than go up against Slack. You'll have a hard time displacing Slack for us, and I'm confident nearly everyone we work with would say the same. Even if we liked CU's chat, we'd still have Slack open for the other 15 teams I chat with, so we'd end up going right back to it, methinks…


In the last quarter of 2017, Twitter had only 330 million users, much less than Facebook that had 2,07 billion users or Instagram that had approximately 700 million users over that same period. Despite being easy to use and a powerful tool for reaching like-minded people or potential customers for your company's products Twitter is slowly losing the reputation it once had.
Now that Mark Zuckerberg controls your hipster, vintage-inspired photos that you took with Instagram, you might be feeling weighed down with the fear that your favorite photography app will see some major changes. I cried for a few minutes, then I realized that I never used Instagram to edit photos because its filters were actually very limited and pretty crappy. There’s tons of better apps out there. If for whatever reason you’re scared to stick with the new Instagram controlled by Facebook, there are plenty of alternatives to Instagram… and in many ways most of them are better. Take a look at these five awesome Instagram alternatives.
With the increasing popularity of digital media, Facebook is also becoming fun home to all social media lovers. There are so many interesting features inside this user friendly and highly interactive platform but cons are also present. At one side, millions of users stay actively connected to Facebook but on the other side, it also faces criticism. The biggest issue is privacy control options on Facebook. Anyone can check your all details while visiting your profile and they can even download your photos without taking any permission from you. Such issues are worth considerable and this is the main reason behind why people are searching for potential Facebook Alternatives. If you are already bored with Facebook App and now want to take a step ahead to more fun then choose any of these Facebook alternatives as discussed below:
In March 2018 Vero jumped from 150,000 users to over 3,000,000 in the wake of Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data breach. The mobile-only platform is well-designed and has some great photo management tools, which may have led to the overall alternative/artistic vibe given off by the current user base. Their privacy policy is not as strong as some others, but they do give users plenty of control and eventually plan to charge a subscription fee in order to avoid advertising, though early adopters will get a free lifetime membership. The mobile-only platform and eventual need to pay for the service may turn some off, but Vero certainly shows some potential.
Polaroid's resurrection continued in 2016 with the release of their social multimedia platform SW/NG, and I'd put it down as one of the most under-rated social mobile platforms around. Forget Instagram Boomerangs, SW/NG brings pictures to life much in the same way Live Photos does on iPhone. Using the app feels similar to Instagram with the continued scroll of your feed, but pictures move as you scroll. The app feels cleaner than Instagram, and encourages users to think differently when composing an image given that a moving subject or background is more compelling.

One of the main features that Diaspora prides itself on is its decentralization. This is to do with its technical background: the platform consists of many different networks, known as pods. User data isn’t collected and stored centrally by the provider, instead the infrastructure is distributed by users themselves, with data carried by these so-called pods. If you have good technical know-how, you can actually operate your own pod, which essentially functions as a server. This means that you can be certain that your private data remains private and in your own hands. Less technically gifted users can use ‘open pods’ in the network instead.
Flickr is another one of the best apps like Instagram. It is a photo and video-hosting program that is acquired by Yahoo in 2005. You can easily upload, edit and share your photos and videos via this platform. It is also available on all commonly used devices such as Android, iOS, Windows, and Linux. What makes Flickr different compared to Instagram is that it focuses on the appreciation of photography. If you are a photo enthusiast, this community is absolutely for you.
I'll come right out and say it: I'm not a big fan of Instagram. And no, it's not because iOS users have had their underpants in a wad over the Android release, but because for me, it really doesn't live up to the hype. (Their new privacy-invading terms of service makes them pretty unappealing, too). Here's why, and more importantly, here are some just-as-good alternatives for Android users (and some for iOS users too!) who want to take and share photos with or without those filters that make a 5-megapixel cell phone camera look like a 70s Polaroid.
Vero is a subscription based social network. It shows no ads and doesn’t collect data. It’s a totally different model to Facebook in the sense that Facebook needs user data in order to make money from them. Vero does collect some usage data which is used to see how often the app is used, but note that this option by default is off. Unlike Facebook where they have everything turned on and you have to go into your settings and turn them off.

MeWe hasn’t gotten quite the coverage it deserves, especially given that Tim Berners-Lee, one of the primary architects of the World Wide Web, sits on its board of advisors. Its interface is simple and intuitive, it covers all the Facebook basics, and it is dedicated to maintaining user privacy. It has advertising, but it is not targeted. They compensate for lower ad revenue by selling add-on services, like voice messaging and message encryption. It’s quite user-friendly, and you may be able to connect your Facebook and Twitter to it, though if this feature currently exists, it’s somewhat well-hidden.

It used to be Instagram’s biggest rival but many feel that Hipstamatic lost the war. That doesn’t mean you can’t get better images from Hipstamatic than Instagram though. The beauty of Hipstamatic is that you can completely customize your camera to take unique pictures. With Hipstamatic you can change your virtual lens, film, or flash to find your own unique take on photography. Share your photos with other friends right in the app, or export them to your preferred social network.

In 2016 Apple banned gab’s mobile app on its Appstore for promoting explicit adult content. This was followed by Play Store in 2017, which banned the app for violating hate speech guidelines of Google. Google further noted during its ban that the platform failed in demonstrating a minimum required level of moderation and encouraged violence. Despite all this, Gab still shelters people who are easy on hate speech and non-art nudity. That said, you’ll have to search for things that could offend you on Gab dedicatedly, or else, it is chiefly stuffed with pop culture art, memes, and fair discussions on a variety of topics. And even if you find something that’s offensive to you, like a discussion on online anonymity, you can use the scroll button and explore some memes on Trump.

Records, and earned 82,000 equivalent album units in the week ending March 28, according to Nielsen Music. Of that sum, 24,000 were in album sales. Bad Habits is the second full-length studio album for the 29-year-old NAV. The Toronto-born rapper, who signed to fellow Toronto native The Weeknd’s XO imprint in 2017, earlier logged three entries on the Billboard 200 chart. NAV (real name: Navraj Singh Goraya) previously visited the top 10 with his debut studio set, Reckless, which debuted and peaked at No. 8 on the June 2, 2018-dated chart. He also logged entries with the collaborative mixtape Perfect Timing with Metro Boomin (No. 13 on Aug. 12, 2017) and his self-titled mixtape (No. 24 on March 18, 2017). Bad Habits was powered by streaming activity, as it collected 57,000 SEA units in its opening frame. That sum equates to 79.08 million on-demand audio streams for the album’s songs in its first week, making the set the most-streamed album
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