Minds is a Facebook clone of sorts that is encrypted, open source, and focuses extensively on free speech. Recently, the site rolled out crypto tokens so users can be rewarded for their participation. You’re rewarded with tokens for your participation, and you can exchange tokens to gain more views if you prefer. You can also send tokens to other channels as tips or for subscriptions.  Learn more about how Minds’ tokens work in Heavy’s story here. If tokens aren’t your thing, you can still use Minds solely for its Facebook alternative option.
Twitter is the one app and website on this list that not only duplicates many of Instagrams photo-filtering capabilities, but also has a huge social network behind it. The people on Instagram are, after all, an enormous part of its appeal. Since late 2012, Twitter's iPhone app has a photo editing feature that mimicks Instagram's core photo-editing capabilities. Twitter is one of the best alternatives to Instagram, with its enormous and active community.
Diaspora is a nonprofit social networking platform similar to Instagram that you can share your status, images, and see other people’s comment on the material. This tool also ensures the users that it will not sell its member’s information to advertisers. However, unlike the other social networking programs above, it has few users. This program is not widely known in many countries.
Facebook has been and remains the undisputed king of the social network market. Granted, in some regions of the world, like Russia or China for example, there is a more level playing field with the success of popular alternatives to Facebook who take an equal market share. But for the most part, Facebook is the worldwide leader when it comes to social interaction online. If you’re using the platform, you’ve got no choice but to accept the network’s settings on privacy and data protection and live with them. If you don’t want to do this, then you’ll have to find a good and conservative alternative to Facebook – and either convince all of your friends, family, colleagues, and acquaintances to join you, or be prepared for the fact that your online friendship circle will be significantly reduced (to begin with at least).

At the end of the last year, the platform has increased the number of characters that can be used in a post, but this move did almost nothing to restore Twitter's former glory. Celebrities getting caught up in Twitter wars, fake accounts and ultra-right-wing supporters have all contributed to the current state of affairs on Twitter. Most people simply decide to use another social network that doesn't have the limitations imposed by a misguided company management and users that lack respect for everyone's right to free speech.
Flickr has had its ups and downs in the last few years, but the photo hosting service is worth considering as a way to edit and share images when you're on the go. With the Flickr app, you can shoot, upload, and geo-tag your photos. It has an easy-to-use interface and acts as a simple tool for moving photos you shoot on your phone to the cloud. Additionally, the Flickr app lets you apply a few filters and a caption, and also lets you share with Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or email. It doesn't have as many editing bells and whistles as some of the other Instagram alternatives, but if you're looking for a simple photo-sharing app that offers basic photo enhancements, this is the app for you.
At the end of the last year, the platform has increased the number of characters that can be used in a post, but this move did almost nothing to restore Twitter's former glory. Celebrities getting caught up in Twitter wars, fake accounts and ultra-right-wing supporters have all contributed to the current state of affairs on Twitter. Most people simply decide to use another social network that doesn't have the limitations imposed by a misguided company management and users that lack respect for everyone's right to free speech.
Tweetlist offers an excellent way to view lists and quickly switch between them. The Tweetlists tab is quick to access and you simply swipe left and right to view different lists. This client is very snappy and has excellent Voice Over accessibility support. Tweetlists also offers support for Twitlonger, Instapaper, and Read it Later. Another fantastic feature of Tweetlist is that conversations open automatically - if a tweet is part of a conversation, the entire conversation will be displayed upon tapping on the tweet.
Why not have a standalone chat feature that integrates well with slack? Not sure how do-able that would be but it would be cool if you could send slack messages right from the Clickup chat session and vise versa -- sort of have them synconized. That way non-slack users still have built in chat and slack users can continue to use slack but the relevant message stream would be viewable from within the clickup chat feature. Not sure if it's possible ... maybe I'm dreaming ...
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