Then there's the killer feature: You can hide sensitive content behind a button before posting, so people don't have to see your long rant, political content, or spoiler for a new episode of a TV show. The system is designed to encourage thoughtful posting—not selfish or gratuitous posts. It's even simple to contribute descriptions of images you're posting for the visually impaired, something Twitter doesn't bother turning on by default.
Here’s what Mastodon is: an open-source, community-run microblogging website. It lets you post “toots,” and you can “boost” other users’ posts. It’s mostly like Twitter, but instead of living in one place, the social network lives in different chunks, called “instances,” each with its own rules and administrators. That’s what makes up a “federation,” and it protects the integrity of the service—there is no single, central server. So, if one instance stops paying for their internet or forgets to re-up their URL, the rest are unharmed in their semi-permeable silos.

I'll come right out and say it: I'm not a big fan of Instagram. And no, it's not because iOS users have had their underpants in a wad over the Android release, but because for me, it really doesn't live up to the hype. (Their new privacy-invading terms of service makes them pretty unappealing, too). Here's why, and more importantly, here are some just-as-good alternatives for Android users (and some for iOS users too!) who want to take and share photos with or without those filters that make a 5-megapixel cell phone camera look like a 70s Polaroid.
Friendly for Facebook is quite a popular third-party Facebook app that has been around for a while. This app can replace both Facebook and Messenger, while it supports themes. The app supports both password and fingerprint scanning security options, while it allows you to download both images and videos. This app even comes with a keyword filtering feature, just in case you’re tired of seeing specific posts pop up on your feed.
Although Vero is similar in many respects to competitors such as Facebook and Instagram (profile, structure, timeline, news feed), the platform offers some interesting unique selling points: The messages in the timeline are not pre-filtered by an algorithm, but appear in chronological order. Contacts can also be divided into four categories: 'followers', 'acquaintances', 'friends', and 'close friends'. These groups can then be selected or deselected as the target group when a post is published, so that only the desired audience is informed.
On Minds, you can subscribe to people whose posts you want to see. I’m on there as StephDwilson. If you try it out, give me a follow. You can register for Minds through my affiliate link if you want, which is here or go without an affiliate link here. Once you sign up, you can create your own affiliate link for referrals. It’s an interesting concept.
Another worry with deleting Facebook is that without it, you won't be able to remember anyone's birthday. Luckily, there's a way to export your friends' birthdays directly from Facebook before you delete your account. First, log into the social network, then click Events on the left-hand side. Toward the bottom, there's an option to add events to your calendar of choice, like Microsoft Outlook, Google Calendar, or Apple Calendar. There, tap "Learn More." You'll be led to a full set of instructions for how to export all your friends' birthdays.
Puffin for Facebook is by the same developers that made Puffin Browser. This is a browser app specifically made for Facebook. It features data compression that allows you to surf Facebook while using less data and also includes a tweaked UI for more enjoyable browsing. It works better on lower-end devices on slower network connections. Those with faster connections and newer phones may have a better experience with a different app. It's completely free with no in-app purchases.
Another idea is to purchase an old school video cam and record real, permanent, physical video on cassette or reel-to-reel. You could also start a video/photo library made of SIM cards from your digital devices so you always have an original hard copy which you can upload to social media at any time without worrying about permanently losing it. I don’t know how much of my life I’ve wasted online, but It’s been too much.
Lots of services can feed you the latest news. Facebook, though, displays the specific stories your friends and family are talking about. If you value that feature, Nuzzel is a great choice. You can sync the app to other social networks you might use, like Twitter and LinkedIn, and it will feed you the articles your friends, as well as friends of friends, are talking about. The app also has a "Best of Nuzzel" feature where you can see the stories being widely discussed across the whole platform.
Facebook kind of took the internet world by storm when it went global in 2006 and it is arguably the biggest social network now. We all have a Facebook account and it would be lying if anyone said they haven’t had one ever. Facebook has been loved so much by people and it continues to add new features in a bid to remain at the top of the social network world. But there are times when we get a little saturated by Facebook and want a new fresh alternative. Although the truth is, there are no worthy Facebook alternatives.

No corporate censorship. As Big Tech®™? censors and deplatforms more users for the tiniest of infractions, Gab will grow. It has its issues (UI needs improvement, needs a “media” tab like Twitter has). I’ve had my account for two years. Not a single lockout, suspension, or forced deletion of my posts. I’m done with Twitter. Guest • Aug 2018 • 12 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Upvote! If ClickUp implements an effective chat function, just like Slack, then I am going to ditch Slack entirely and migrate my team to ClickUp once and for all. Slack is a simple idea (compared to something like Git), but has achieved tremendous success because it fulfills an essential and important need for running any kinds of businesses or organizations. Of course, its sophistication makes it a better tool than alternative solutions like whatsapp. But it is still a pain in the neck to go back and forth between Slack and ClickUp or another management tool. I seriously feel that ClickUp has the potential to compete with Slack. I also feel the philosophy of the ClickUp is compatible with this model of combining communication with project management. You care about UX, and not just what you could make and sell. From a user's perspective, I'd like to have a tool where I could talk to my team members and manage projects/tasks at the same time.
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