Pros & Cons Using Twitter For eLearning: What eLearning professionals should know! 8 pros and 6 cons on How To Use Twitter For eLearning!advantage using twitterpros and cons of trump using twitterbenefits of twitter in educationpros and cons of twitter for businessnegatives of twitterteachers using twitter in the classroomPeople also search for ...
It brings the best of both Instagram and Facebook together into one beautiful app for sharing everything from photos and videos, to music and books. And if you ever find yourself overwhelmed with too many friends on Path, you can take advantage of the convenient "Inner Circle" feature to bring you back to your connections with those you care about most.
MeWe’s Alexa ranking is lower than Steemit’s, coming in at 28,506 globally and 7,300 in the U.S. But it’s definitely growing in interest. David Westreich from MeWe shared some interesting statistics about the site with Heavy. MeWe currently has more than 70,000 groups, and it’s available on iOS, Android, and Desktop in eight languages. MeWe is currently the number 6 trending app in the Google Play Store. Its global appeal is seen in that it ranked number one as the most downloaded app in Saudi Arabia last month.
Metal for Facebook and Twitter is one of the up-and-coming Facebook apps. There has been a lot of positive press over the last couple of years. Like most, this is a web-wrapper (the mobile website inside of an app) with some tweaks and additional features included to improve the experience. It boasts an ad-free experience, advanced notifications, a few UI tweaks, and there are even theming options. The developer has had a good track record with updating the app with new Facebook features (along with fingerprint support) and it’s a pleasant overall experience.
MeWe bills itself as the ad-free, spyware-free, and censorship-free social network. Share your photos, videos, voice messages, GIFs, memes, and more to just one person, a specific group, or all your contacts. You can also send people disappearing GIFs and photos. Either way, MeWe won't track you. If you want to send end-to-end encrypted chats, however, it'll cost you 99 cents per month or $5.99 per year.
With Google’s messaging apps a real mess right now (Hangouts is good but rarely used), and Facebook in charge of Instagram and WhatsApp, the other genuine alternatives are Signal and Telegram. We prefer the former for its stronger encryption, but they both do messages, calls, media, groups, and more. Whichever you pick though, you’ve then got the job of trying to get all your friends to switch too.
If you primarily use social networks for getting your daily dose of news, you have tons of options at your disposal. Digg, Flipboard, Feedly, Google News, Apple News, etc., are great options. Digg stands out among them due to its interesting curation process. From various media outlets, it provides the most important stories and videos. It’s a thumbs-up-based website and you can use it even without creating an account.
The aptly named Hipster borrows a lot from Instagram, including the snappy photo shooting and all of the great filters you can apply to your photos. Hipster also allows you to add text captions to your photo "postcards" before sharing them, and then post your photos to Twiter, Facebook, Flickr, or Tumblr for others to see. It's fast, easy to use, and probably the simplest to get started with in the roundup.
There you have it. Four great—if not better—alternatives to Instagram. I admit, I don't hate the app as much as I implied earlier, but it's difficult to watch great apps and alternatives get swept under the rug simply because of trendiness and flash rather than substance and features. Still, you may not agree with me—perhaps you've used one of these apps and still prefer Instagram, if only to make iOS users angry? Perhaps there's a killer Instagram feature I've overlooked, or a killer alternative worth mentioning? Whatever you think, agree or disagree, share your thoughts in the discussions below.
This idea is antithetical to current consumer marketing ethos, which strives to reach targeted audiences at scale. If you want targeting at scale, you go to Facebook or Google. Either can give you practically everyone in America who fits your target. To be fair, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest can all serve up pretty big targeted audiences.
The aptly named Hipster borrows a lot from Instagram, including the snappy photo shooting and all of the great filters you can apply to your photos. Hipster also allows you to add text captions to your photo "postcards" before sharing them, and then post your photos to Twiter, Facebook, Flickr, or Tumblr for others to see. It's fast, easy to use, and probably the simplest to get started with in the roundup.
App.Net was, I think, the closest we’ve come to a good Twitter alternative, and it came out back in 2012. It did basically everything Twitter did, but nicer. It had a decent web experience and a great selection of third party apps up and running within weeks of launch. And while it was a paid service (and maybe therefore doomed from the start), tons of people in the tech community went there and were having lively discussions. My App.Net feed was a joy to browse, and most of my Twitter friends were there. Oh yeah, and it was an app platform that let some devs build off their back end in interesting ways.

One word of warning: Many dating apps require Facebook integration to work, meaning you won't be able to use them if you delete your account. You can still create a Tinder account without Facebook, but you will loose all your current matches and conversations. Hinge and Bumble require you to have a Facebook account to sign up, though the latter company says it's working on dropping that requirement.
Some Facebook alternatives focus more on local features. Nextdoor is about connecting users with the people in their real-life community – where they live – while Raftr takes the approach of linking people who are interested in the same topics or activities, wherever they are in the world. Boot-sale app Shpock, meanwhile, already arguably does a better job than Facebook’s Marketplace feature at being a more-local eBay.
Twitter has become a cultural icon since being introduced in 2006. Even President Donald Trump of the United States has gained notoriety for his use of Twitter. Users of the platform are able to send "tweets" which can be no longer than 280 characters. This is double the original limit of 140 characters. In some Asian languages, 140 characters remains the standard.
Users are allowed to self-censor by flagging (although flagging is discouraged), and they vote on the merits of a post through upvotes, much like you would “like” a Facebook post or upvote a Reddit submission. But the big thing that makes Steemit stand out is that you get paid for your posts in the form of Steem cryptocurrency, based on how many votes your posts get. And you also get paid based on your own curation of other people’s posts, and the upvotes that your comments on posts receive.

Now that Mark Zuckerberg controls your hipster, vintage-inspired photos that you took with Instagram, you might be feeling weighed down with the fear that your favorite photography app will see some major changes. I cried for a few minutes, then I realized that I never used Instagram to edit photos because its filters were actually very limited and pretty crappy. There’s tons of better apps out there. If for whatever reason you’re scared to stick with the new Instagram controlled by Facebook, there are plenty of alternatives to Instagram… and in many ways most of them are better. Take a look at these five awesome Instagram alternatives.
i have asked for instructions on how to get this to them..i have no idea how to send …no response …they say i have pertented to be someone else on this account. I have since the beginning of fb…i have had hackers before get in ..on this same acct. Never was ask to prove who i am…i am doing some serious thought of deleting my fb..they have locked me out…they are not talking to me…very controlling company they have become..personally i believe its poitical.. which ..if any of these social media are best for me to jump to.?

Last year, Mastodon made splashes as an open source Twitter competitor but you can also use it as a Facebook alternative. Apart from all the differences in terms of privacy, character length, what really sets Mastodon apart is the “instance” feature. You can think of the service as a series of connected nodes (instances) and your account belongs to a particular instance.
@Zach Snader I actually somewhat disagree with @Lee Fuhr. I think this would be a great feature. I like Slack, but at the same time I don't. I like it because i know how to use it, but when dealing with teams and clients (especially), some people may not understand how to use Slack. I've seen it many times with people in my circles. For example courses and memberships held within Slack. Navigating the interface was too difficult for some people and they didn't know how to reply and keep a conversation in one thread. And many people complained about it. The idea isn't to compete with Slack, but to innovate and create something that caters to those who aren't necessarily Slack's ideal users.
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