Upvote! If ClickUp implements an effective chat function, just like Slack, then I am going to ditch Slack entirely and migrate my team to ClickUp once and for all. Slack is a simple idea (compared to something like Git), but has achieved tremendous success because it fulfills an essential and important need for running any kinds of businesses or organizations. Of course, its sophistication makes it a better tool than alternative solutions like whatsapp. But it is still a pain in the neck to go back and forth between Slack and ClickUp or another management tool. I seriously feel that ClickUp has the potential to compete with Slack. I also feel the philosophy of the ClickUp is compatible with this model of combining communication with project management. You care about UX, and not just what you could make and sell. From a user's perspective, I'd like to have a tool where I could talk to my team members and manage projects/tasks at the same time.
If you primarily use social networks for getting your daily dose of news, you have tons of options at your disposal. Digg, Flipboard, Feedly, Google News, Apple News, etc., are great options. Digg stands out among them due to its interesting curation process. From various media outlets, it provides the most important stories and videos. It’s a thumbs-up-based website and you can use it even without creating an account.
‘Mastodon isn’t one place and one set of rules,’ it states in their official website. It is unique as it can be used as individual instances, which are specialized versions of the platform themed by the topics of user’s interests. However, you’d need your own server for running your social media platform—whose method is widely available on the internet. Businesses and advertisers can take advantage of this and create their own social media platform on their own infrastructure. And since it is your own social media, you make your own rules.
Hootsuite is another one of those Twitter -- and Facebook, LinkedIn, and Foursquare -- apps that seems aimed more squarely at social network and social media marketing types rather than average users, but if you have a brand to push and love you some stats, especially if you're already all in with Hootsuite on the app, the app is a great companion.

The terms and conditions are not worth the pixels or electrons that make up that agreement. Each and every agreement in the world contains the phrase "The provider of the service reserves the right to change the terms of this agreement at any time without prior notification". If the owner of the site where you store your images decides to block your access to those images or to the site, what are you going to do?

MeWe bills itself as the ad-free, spyware-free, and censorship-free social network. Share your photos, videos, voice messages, GIFs, memes, and more to just one person, a specific group, or all your contacts. You can also send people disappearing GIFs and photos. Either way, MeWe won't track you. If you want to send end-to-end encrypted chats, however, it'll cost you 99 cents per month or $5.99 per year.


Fb…just did that to me ..cut me off after a hacker hacked into my account. They’re asking for photo proof, age and my name..the list of documuments they will accept to send as proof is my ss card ..drivers licenses..things i’m not really sure i want them to see..they tell me to cover up some of the information but my address will still be visible. I even asked if this was FB. No response except they can not go future without proof..
Minds is a Facebook clone of sorts that is encrypted, open source, and focuses extensively on free speech. Recently, the site rolled out crypto tokens so users can be rewarded for their participation. You’re rewarded with tokens for your participation, and you can exchange tokens to gain more views if you prefer. You can also send tokens to other channels as tips or for subscriptions.  Learn more about how Minds’ tokens work in Heavy’s story here. If tokens aren’t your thing, you can still use Minds solely for its Facebook alternative option.
Ello first gained popularity in the US about 3 years ago when it posed itself as a Facebook killer social network. This happened due to Facebook’s policy of forcing the members to use their legal name. Since then, it had made headlines on different occasions due to different reasons. Now that Zuckerberg’s service is facing flak, Ello is again gaining some traction. Primarily focused on artists and creative people, Ello is also ad-free. It also refrains itself from selling the information about the users to third parties. By being a niche website, Ello continues to attract users and establishing as a creators network.
The fragmentation that easily happens in decentralized networks can be a blessing, especially for groups that form around beliefs or identities where it can be hard to meet people safely. For instance, those belonging to marginalized groups, or folks with more fringe or misunderstood interests tend to appreciate the in-group feeling they get from a federated social network.
Twitter profiles can be customized with photos and headers. Users are also able to follow other Twitter users. Many famous people use the platform to communicate with the masses. Twitter has also become a source for news. During the 2016 United States election, more than 40 million tweets were sent about election results. One of the reasons Twitter is so popular in this regard is that breaking news can be conveyed immediately. It can often be tweeted faster than it can be reported by major news outlets.
Flickr also has a higher grouping called collections where albums can be grouped. I had two projects going in 2012, the Full Moon project and the Equinox/Solstice project. I grouped my monthly full moons into individual albums and for the Equinox/Solstice, spring, summer. fall, and winter had an album. The monthly full moon albums were grouped into the Full Moon collection, and the spring, summer, fall, and winter albums were grouped in the Equinox/Solstice collection.
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Ello launched back in 2014 with quite a stir in the US as it was about the time when Facebook changed its policy on names of its members, where they had to use their proper legal name. Its popularity grew as Ello presented itself to the world as a “Facebook killer social network” which doesn’t push ads down its users’ throats and doesn’t sell peoples’ information and data to 3rd parties.
There’s always a risk that a network turns into a home solely for niche sites, alienating folks who are simply looking for a new home – the experiment that was (and still is) SecondLife springs to mind. Most detractors of decentralized networks say that they’re too niche, and maybe a bit too nerdy, to ever catch on enough to supplant something like Facebook. Really though, only time will tell.
I switched to facebook because it was much more simple than myspace and didn't have all the crap myspace does. But facebook is making the same mistake myspace did by adding applications that can post and even have full control over your account. Also it seems facebook is filling up with a bunch of little kids now, which is making me lose intrest in even using the site anymore.

Users can upload images and videos and use them to tell a story using various layout templates. If you want to tell a story with a series of images, you can then add new videos or images before sharing them. These images can then be seen in the ‘storyline’ feed along with any other stories that a particular user follows. Other users can like and comment on posts in the exact same way as on Instagram, and can also share them to other social media platforms: as can you.
Justin. It sounds like YOU are directly responsible for why so many right thinking mind are looking for a fakebook replacement. The trend has been for a trump hater to like, then comment on a trump post. That comment is always malicious and designed to piss off trymp supporters. Eventually, the teump supporter says something in trumps defense that people like you would then report. That makes facebook determine the conservative always the offender and is then booted. No 1st ammendment with this current situation.
The biggest problem with Plurk is its lack of growth. The service still lacks some quality of life features and makes it difficult to do things like search and manage multiple conversations. This means that Plurk is widely used by long-time users. Since many of those long-time users are based in Taiwan and Asia, you might feel like a stranger in a strange land.

SlimSocial is a newer Facebook app that keeps it wicked simple. Its claim to fame is its intensely small size (100KB), that it shows no ads, and that it’s open source so you can go view the source code and contribute to its development if you want to. Aside from that, there isn’t much to talk about. It'll be a little slow and clunky like many third party apps. It's not that bad, though. The developer has also expressed interest in adding new features down the road like background notifications along with more stuff. .
Auf diese Art „twittere” ich nun schon einige Wochen wieder über beide Kanäle. Als heute bei Twitter nach dem Ausfall eine kleine Diskussion begann, ob man nicht mal wieder Identi.ca ausprobieren sollte. Das bekam eine ziemliche Dynamik und ich musste feststellen, dass fast jeder meiner regelmäßigen Twitterkontakte bereits einen Identi.ca-Account hatte – zum Teil schon sehr lange, oft aber auch lange nicht genutzt.

Facebook’s ongoing security and privacy issues 4 Reasons Why Facebook Is a Security and Privacy Nightmare 4 Reasons Why Facebook Is a Security and Privacy Nightmare Facebook is no longer the king of the social media castle. If you value your anonymity, security, and privacy, here are some great reasons to quit Facebook today. Read More mean young people are leaving in their droves. According to Pew Research, 44 percent of users aged 18 to 29 said they deleted the app in the last year. Given they are also the demographic who are most likely to understand Facebook’s confusing privacy settings (64 percent), this is all rather worrying.
I found it confusing to use (maybe you need to be more techy?) and was put off by the fact that I needed to log in via Twitter. Perhaps this is just so you can connect with the same people. It’s always worthwhile to look at your options. Mastodon was started by Eugen Rochko, who was fed up with the changes that Twitter was making that closely resembled the Facebook algorithms.
Swift for Facebook Lite is among the lightest Android Facebook options. It boasts an install size of 30MB and 20MB of RAM use. The install size isn't that impressive but the RAM use is. It also boasts Facebook and Facebook Messenger features. You can do the basic stuff. That includes uploading photo/video, tagging friends, posting updates, and interacting with posts. It's not going to blow you out of the water. However, it gets you to where you need to go without taking up too many of your phone resources. You can get rid of the ads for a single $0.99 in-app purchase.

GitHub is a network for programmers, where developers can take help to develop their projects better. It provides tools for your programming needs along with codes you can fork for your own project. You can also choose to not make your code public but that requires a paid subscription. There’s also issue tracking, code reviews and more. If you would like to use something other than GitHub, there are a number of good alternatives.
Traditional e-mail is still a big part of online communication for private and for business use, with many users typically opting for Outlook as their e-mail client. For PC users, Microsoft is practically an essential, but many private users and small businesses often look for alternatives. Luckily, there is a great number of free e-mail programs available for anyone put off by Outlook’s licensing...
Polaroid's resurrection continued in 2016 with the release of their social multimedia platform SW/NG, and I'd put it down as one of the most under-rated social mobile platforms around. Forget Instagram Boomerangs, SW/NG brings pictures to life much in the same way Live Photos does on iPhone. Using the app feels similar to Instagram with the continued scroll of your feed, but pictures move as you scroll. The app feels cleaner than Instagram, and encourages users to think differently when composing an image given that a moving subject or background is more compelling.
Look familiar? We originally published this post shortly after Facebook's acquisition of and the Android launch of Instagram. We were concerned then about the influence Facebook would have on it, and now it's borne fruit in the form of an invasive terms-of-service agreement. The agreement gives Instagram rights to and ownership of your photos to sell and use in ads as they see fit. Sure, you probably don't care if they sell that photo of your coffee foam, but you and your friends may care if they sell photos of your faces or likenesses to a company that uses your shot in their ad material. Unfortunately, at this stage the only way to opt-out is to close your account and move to another service, like some of these great alternatives.
According to sources at the company, the app currently has around 22 million users (Figures accurate as of April 2017). The platform is growing, collecting big investments and extending its functions and features on a regular basis. Its basic idea is the same as Instagram’s: EyeEm is a platform made for sharing photos. Snapshots and professional images can be uploaded and then shared with the community on EyeEm and other linked networks – with a range of different filters and editing tools to add that extra star quality.

Eyeem is the fastest growing photography sharing sites by the four members (Florian Meissner, Ramzi Rizk, Gen Sadakane, Lorenz Aschoff) launched in 2010 to provide a platform to the internet users to upload and publish their photos to get discovered by the relevant audience.  There is nothing unique about the Eyeem, it works same as the other popular images hosting site do.
Groups are the hardest feature of Facebook to replace, since they serve a wide range of purposes for different people. If you're looking to organize friends and family in one place, GroupMe is a great choice. The app helps create an organized group chat, where you can share photos and messages. If you're looking for a larger circle of people interested in the same topic, there's almost certainly a sub-group on Reddit to fill your needs. The forum site has active communities organized around everything from skincare to anime.
Maki is not only a replacement for Facebook, but for a number of other apps, including (Facebook) Messenger, Twitter, Instagram, and so on. This app allows you to customize not only themes, but also its navigation panel, while you can also save bookmarks via the app, and make some layout changes. Power saving mode is included in the app, while you can also lock this app via a password or your fingerprint, which is a feature that is built into the app.
Facebook has been under relentless attack since the Cambridge Analytica scandal in early 2018. Broadcasters and news publishers have declared open season on Mark Zuckerberg, Sheryl Sandberg, and other senior executives at the company. And while not quite ubiquitous, #deletefacebook pops up every time there’s a story about data privacy. The EU has fined them, the US is trying to figure out how to regulate them, and the notion that free services should be absolutely free (as opposed to checking a box on a terms and conditions page that allows the free service to use your data as payment) is gaining traction.
Minds is a Facebook clone of sorts that is encrypted, open source, and focuses extensively on free speech. Recently, the site rolled out crypto tokens so users can be rewarded for their participation. You’re rewarded with tokens for your participation, and you can exchange tokens to gain more views if you prefer. You can also send tokens to other channels as tips or for subscriptions.  Learn more about how Minds’ tokens work in Heavy’s story here. If tokens aren’t your thing, you can still use Minds solely for its Facebook alternative option.
Another interesting Instagram alternative is called Twitter. This is an online social networking platform where people can connect with others by making use of short content messages called Tweets. Many celebrities and famous personnel are using this app, where you can easily follow them and learn their stories by following their main account. Aside from that, you can also create your own tweets and share photos with your friends. This platform also offers some of the available filters that you can also find in Instagram. Moreover, Twitter on iPhone has a built-in editor for photos that is an additional super function.

There are also sister “apps” to Steemit that work within the Steem blockchain. These include DTube (a YouTube alternative), DMania (getting paid for memes), DLive (for live streaming) and Zappl (a Twitter alternative.) My very first Zap just read: “This is my very first Zappl and I have absolutely no idea what I’m doing,” and it earned me six cents. You can learn more about these apps by reading the Steemit story here. Steemit also has an active “in person” community, including a Steem Creators Conference that’s coming to Las Vegas in mid-April.
We love the clean and simple layout and the back to basics concept. There are no hashtags and it’s not about collecting heart-shaped likes: the focus is purely on sharing beautiful work with people who appreciate photography. The curated collections are a great place to find inspiration for your next shoot, and 500px actively encourage open and honest feedback with the aim of helping users improve their work. These collections are put together by fellow photographers and are broken down into categories such as people and nature, so you can delve into what you love without sifting through the rest.
There’s a bit of a barrier to entry, but it’s not that tough. If you need help signing up, there’s a great beginner’s guide here. Madeline Stone, who oversees public relations for Steemit, shared some advice on getting started on Steemit with Heavy.com. She advised:  “As far as helping people who are joining Steemit for the first time, posting in the introduceyourself tag is a great way to get started — other Steemians will then comment on your post and provide resources for newbies. People can also look for help by posting questions in the #help channel at https://steem.chat/home.”

It's like twitter, but minus the stuff you don't like, and made better. It introduces instances, which are connected but are their own separate site with their own rules and moderation, It has a 500 character limit for every "toot", and most of the instances have an amazing community from what I can tell. It honestly is the best alternative to Twitter. Veencorr • Mar 2018 • 3 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Users are allowed to self-censor by flagging (although flagging is discouraged), and they vote on the merits of a post through upvotes, much like you would “like” a Facebook post or upvote a Reddit submission. But the big thing that makes Steemit stand out is that you get paid for your posts in the form of Steem cryptocurrency, based on how many votes your posts get. And you also get paid based on your own curation of other people’s posts, and the upvotes that your comments on posts receive.

No matter which Twitter alternative you use; you would see the growing influence of Musical.ly on other platforms. Muical.ly allows you to use famous audio cues from the platform to record a video performance. After you record the video, you are given plenty of filters and effects to add upon it. It then gives you an ability to share between the other social media platforms. After you publish your performance, it goes out in the public thread. This might raise an arrow or two for its lousy privacy, but Musical.ly have its privacy policy in place, fortunately. You can quickly change the privacy setting and select who can see your posts.

Das Programm ist in den Bundesländern Baden-Württemberg, Brandenburg, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Saarland und Thüringen aktiv. Die Durchführung der CHAT der WELTEN-Projekte wird durch die jeweiligen Partner in den Bundesländern vorgenommen. Die durchführenden Organisationen sind in Baden-Württemberg das Entwicklungspädagogische Informationszentrum (EPiZ) in Reutlingen, in Brandenburg die Regionalen Arbeitsstellen für Bildung, Integration und Demokratie (RAA), im Saarland das Netzwerk Entwicklungspolitik im Saarland e.V. (NES) und in Thüringen das Eine Welt Netzwerk Thüringen e.V. (EWNT).
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