Here’s what Mastodon is: an open-source, community-run microblogging website. It lets you post “toots,” and you can “boost” other users’ posts. It’s mostly like Twitter, but instead of living in one place, the social network lives in different chunks, called “instances,” each with its own rules and administrators. That’s what makes up a “federation,” and it protects the integrity of the service—there is no single, central server. So, if one instance stops paying for their internet or forgets to re-up their URL, the rest are unharmed in their semi-permeable silos.
 You will be amazed to know that Instagram allows users to upload about thousands of images on its platform within few seconds. It can instantly connect you to many other networking sites too like Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr etc for easy sharing of stories. The best part is that this platform is not just limited to Photo sharing rather it can also be used for sharing eye catching videos but the maximum supported time duration for videos is 15 seconds only. Instagram also allows people to follow others like most of the social media applications. Users can customize their account settings with ease so that privacy of all uploaded photos or videos can be maintained.
Twitter’s key advantage for me is that it just feels like the place everyone is talking. Basically everyone you want to hear from, whether they be celebrities, athletes, politicians, actors, writers, or regular old people, they’re almost certainly on Twitter. Not only are they there, but they’re active and use it as a one-stop-shop for talking about everything they’re doing. If you’re not on Twitter, you’re cutting out a main place things are announced and talked about.
PicPlz used to be my personal favorite, until pressure from Instagram on Android forced them to shut down. In their place though, a new challenger has risen—one with an old name. Flickr's new Android app brings most—if not all—of the same features that Instagram offers and combines them with Flickr's own photo-centric social network where your photos belong to you and no one else. Flickr's new Android app lets you take photos straight from your camera and apply filters to them if you choose, then share them with friends on Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, or anywhere else you choose.
You see, there are two types of people in this world, those who love Twitter and those who think that Twitter is nothing but a total waste. If you are the second one, then this article is for you. Here, I am going to post a few websites which are considered as the best alternatives of Twitter. So without uttering any more word, here we are discussing those sites.
Hipstamatic differentiates itself from the crowd of retro-camera apps in four ways. First, it's not free (only one other app on this list is a paid app). Second, it features a nifty old-camera-style user interface—a spitting image of a 1970s Kodak Instamatic camera. Third, it offers group albums. And fourth, it lets you apply effects before snapping a photo, so you can preview how it will look.

This is the only app that you have to pay for on our list, but according to the creators you’ll be treated as a priority rather than a product because of this. There’s a 14 day free trial available so you can play around with the features on offer, but if you want to be part of their community it’ll cost you between $47.88 per year for the basic package and $359.88 per year for the business package which provides you with all the tools you need to make your account a professional, client friendly portfolio.
It’s an interesting system that is flawed in a few ways. First off, Minds user base isn’t quite large enough to really incentivize you to reach as many users as possible via tokens. As such, you’re still kind of better off using your promotion time on Twitter and Facebook. Even if your content gets sucked into the void, it still feels like you’re getting more attention on popular platforms.

Hipstamatic differentiates itself from the crowd of retro-camera apps in four ways. First, it's not free (only one other app on this list is a paid app). Second, it features a nifty old-camera-style user interface—a spitting image of a 1970s Kodak Instamatic camera. Third, it offers group albums. And fourth, it lets you apply effects before snapping a photo, so you can preview how it will look.


Pros & Cons Of course, Twitter has its disadvantages as well as advantages. To determine whether this social media platform would be the right fit for your  pros and cons of twitter for businessnegatives of twittertwitter 280 characters pros and conspros and cons instagrampros and cons of snapchat for businessbenefits of twitter vs facebookPeople also search for ...
There are over 20 different filters and borders to choose from, and you can opt to geo-tag your photos with the location where they were taken. Hipster also has a social network behind the scenes here too, and even if we don't think it's terribly useful, it's full of gorgeous photos and really intimate views of the lives of the people who use the app. Plus, it's essential for any good Instagram alternative. If you opt to join, or connect with people who are also using the app, you can look at a map of where other users near you are located and sharing their photos. Oh, and yes—this app is available for iOS and Android as well.
We’ve talked about how great VSCO is before, but it deserves another mention here. VSCO is a community of creatives from all over the globe coming together to connect and share their work. Aimed at people with a keen interest in photography, this platform attracts photographers working at a high level, so the work you’ll see here is of a great quality and is bursting with innovation.

While a free speech focused service might not seem unreasonable, it hasn’t worked out well for Gab so far. Its mobile app was banned in 2016 from the Apple App Store due to adult content. In 2017, meanwhile, Google removed the app from the Play Store for violating its hate speech policy, noting that Gab failed to “demonstrate a sufficient level of moderation, including for content that encourages violence and advocates hate against groups of people.”

Here's what I think you'll find: Mastodon users are nice people. The wider federated network has posts in English, Japanese, Spanish, and from techy open source enthusiasts. It's way more queer and trans-friendly. Neurodivergent users are out and proud. Furries are all about it. I'm seeing more and more amazing artists posting their work. Sex workers exiled from other social media have even made their home on a Mastodon instance.
Trusted platform that does not ban people for offensive speech... speak freely is their motto. No Ads, and you can freely speak your mind without fear of being suspended, and without bias developers controlling statistics. As long as you follow the few simple guidelines that prevent bots, parody sites, and fake account abuse, you can speak freely without retribution. troberge • Apr 2017 • 15 agrees and 8 disagrees Disagree   Agree
@Zeb: Hi! Please consider putting this back on the roadmap. Our team members don’t want 2 apps going. When you do an universal search, you want it to search both tasks and chats in one platform, not check two. Also, you want to be able to create tasks on the fly while you’re chatting. Sometimes your previous chat message should actually be converted into a task which should be done in a click. There are so many messages that fly between a team that don’t “fit” into a task. Team chats are really essential to us and we would love to move from Flow but it doesn’t make sense logistically to go from one app to two because we want to simplify not complicate the process. Chat and tasks really should be linked.
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