I'll come right out and say it: I'm not a big fan of Instagram. And no, it's not because iOS users have had their underpants in a wad over the Android release, but because for me, it really doesn't live up to the hype. (Their new privacy-invading terms of service makes them pretty unappealing, too). Here's why, and more importantly, here are some just-as-good alternatives for Android users (and some for iOS users too!) who want to take and share photos with or without those filters that make a 5-megapixel cell phone camera look like a 70s Polaroid.
This platform is aiming to be the best place to show your work on your smartphone either for fun or for business, and it’s doing a pretty good job of achieving this. You can’t create galleries directly on the app, but what you can do is create them ahead of time on your computer and then have them in your pocket ready for whenever you need to show off your work.

The app supports 14 different filters, 15 photo borders, and operates a social stream much like Twitter where you can @-reply other users and follow # hashtags to see photos of specific places, topics, or events. You even get the missing-from-Instagram tilt-shift option for your shots, in rectangular, elliptical, circular, and parallel varieties. Finally, you can also edit your photos—crop them, rotate them, edit the contrast or color balance, whatever you choose. It's also available for both Android and IOS, and with the number of features it's packed with, it's surprising it's not more popular than Instagram.
LocalLink is an application that allows people to find other people who share their interests and collaborate with them. LocalLink allows them to search for groups in their city and/or locality, join them, and communicate with them with ease. Made with AppInventor (and Fusion Tables at core), LocalLink is partially community - driven, and has several safety … See more
For those determined to exit the Facebook ecosystem, the best approach is more likely to be a patchwork of sites and apps that mirror individual features. Messaging is the easiest: apps such as Telegram and Signal offer messaging and group chats, as well as voice calls, with encryption to keep your communications private. Telegram even has a thriving collection of chatbots, similar to Facebook Messenger.
It also has a desktop version, allowing you to sync messages between your computer and phone, just like on Messenger. Signal can import your contacts, so it's easy to start a thread with anyone you already have saved in your phone. Signal also has several additional security features that might come in handy if you're aiming to avoid surveillance, like the ability to set messages to delete after a certain amount of time. You can also use Signal to make voice and video calls, just like on Messenger. There are absolutely no advertisements, and the app does not collect your personal information.
From the planning side, collecting peoples' contact info can be a pain, sure. But that's a one-time bother. From there, use Paperless Post for beautiful and functional email invites and RSVP tracking. And for more rote calendar-coordination, use Doodle to find the best day for a dinner or meeting that works for everyone. The site lets each guest respond with a time that works for them, so you can easily figure out how best to accommodate everyone's schedule.

While deleting Facebook might feel like a step in a more private direction, it's ultimately not going to do much to change the online digital economy that profits by collecting your personal information and selling it to data brokers. Facebook collects arguably the most private information, but plenty of other popular social networking apps like Snapchat and Twitter collect your data too. That's their entire business model: When you're not paying for a product, you are the product. Even your internet-service provider is likely collecting your personal information. In fact, through its expansive ad network, Facebook even collects info from people who aren't even on the platform.
Records, and earned 82,000 equivalent album units in the week ending March 28, according to Nielsen Music. Of that sum, 24,000 were in album sales. Bad Habits is the second full-length studio album for the 29-year-old NAV. The Toronto-born rapper, who signed to fellow Toronto native The Weeknd’s XO imprint in 2017, earlier logged three entries on the Billboard 200 chart. NAV (real name: Navraj Singh Goraya) previously visited the top 10 with his debut studio set, Reckless, which debuted and peaked at No. 8 on the June 2, 2018-dated chart. He also logged entries with the collaborative mixtape Perfect Timing with Metro Boomin (No. 13 on Aug. 12, 2017) and his self-titled mixtape (No. 24 on March 18, 2017). Bad Habits was powered by streaming activity, as it collected 57,000 SEA units in its opening frame. That sum equates to 79.08 million on-demand audio streams for the album’s songs in its first week, making the set the most-streamed album
If you're looking for a photo editing app that lets you do more than dress up your images, something that really lets you fine-tune them, Snapseed is the ticket. Snapseed is PCMag's Editors' Choice for iPhone camera apps. We love its non-destructive editing capabilities, powerful photo correction, localized adjustments, and variety of image-enhancing effects.
There are very successful focused business-oriented social networks. LinkedIn, for example, attracts job seekers, as does Dribbble, which bills itself as the leading destination to find and showcase creative work. Work-focused networks are thriving. Which raises the question, “Would a big media brand or a big lifestyle brand have consumer permission to found and run a tightly focused social network?”
Snapchat will be hoping to pick up some Facebook refuseniks in the coming weeks, especially since a recent (controversial) redesign of its app to make it less confusing for new users. Last year saw plenty of speculation that Snapchat was losing customers to Instagram in particular, although for the moment there is no sense yet that the flow is reversing following the Cambridge Analytica revelations.
Das Programm ist in den Bundesländern Baden-Württemberg, Brandenburg, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Saarland und Thüringen aktiv. Die Durchführung der CHAT der WELTEN-Projekte wird durch die jeweiligen Partner in den Bundesländern vorgenommen. Die durchführenden Organisationen sind in Baden-Württemberg das Entwicklungspädagogische Informationszentrum (EPiZ) in Reutlingen, in Brandenburg die Regionalen Arbeitsstellen für Bildung, Integration und Demokratie (RAA), im Saarland das Netzwerk Entwicklungspolitik im Saarland e.V. (NES) und in Thüringen das Eine Welt Netzwerk Thüringen e.V. (EWNT).
The terms and conditions are not worth the pixels or electrons that make up that agreement. Each and every agreement in the world contains the phrase "The provider of the service reserves the right to change the terms of this agreement at any time without prior notification". If the owner of the site where you store your images decides to block your access to those images or to the site, what are you going to do?
Diaspora's key advantage is that it's based on open source software that multiple servers can run. It does not put your private information, your likes, your contacts and your photos in the hands of one corporation who then use it to increase their own private profits by selling your privacy. Diaspora is much smaller though. The UI feels more like Google Plus than Facebook. JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 8 agrees and 2 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Here's the thing—putting aside the fact that some very vocal iOS users are very upset that their precious app has descended to the likes of Android users (let's be clear, some iOS users, not all - most people understand that the device you use, OS you prefer, or browser you surf with is not who you are) and the social commentary the whole depressing fiasco gives us, the truth is that while Instagram has great hype, slick sex appeal, and a bolted-on social aspect, it doesn't do anything that a half-dozen other apps for iOS and Android don't do. In fact, some of those Android apps do it just as well or better.

[AGENDA] Apply to the School for Transnational Activism and participate in a series of 3 workshops in Warsaw, Rijeka and Palermo #migrantsrights #citizenship #feminism #gender #climatejustice #data and #digitalrights https://www.citizensforeurope.eu/agenda/call-for-applications-school-of-transnational-activism … via @EuroAlter Deadline 22 April!pic.twitter.com/MSnUOILZzo


It's very much like Twitter with a character limit of 500, except there's not *one* website you have to trust, but you can choose the mastodon server ("instance") that you trust and they are linked, so you can follow people from other instances. The instances all have their own rules, so you can pick a place with as few or many rules as you are comfortable with. mrmbl • May 2017 • 12 agrees and 5 disagrees Disagree   Agree

Plurk features a horizontal timeline and it lets you share pictures, videos or URLs for web-based articles. The platform stimulates its users to spend more time engaging with other Plurk members through the concept of Karma, which grants you access to more emoticons. This social network can be accessed from iPhones, Android devices or from PC or Mac computers.

Mit dem Einsatz digitaler Medien überwindet es geografische Distanzen zwischen Menschen und bietet die Möglichkeit zu authentischen Begegnungen. Schulklassen in Deutschland bekommen die Chance, sich in einem Computer-Chat mit Schulklassen oder Einzelpersonen im Globalen Süden auszutauschen. Ebenso haben Schulklassen aus dem Globalen Süden die Möglichkeit, mit Schulklassen und Einzelpersonen in Deutschland in Kontakt zu kommen.

×