While Path isn’t necessarily a true competitor to Instagram, it has many of the same features. You can capture photos in the app, apply filters, export them to other apps, or post them on your stream for friends to view. Most of the privacy concerns surrounding Path have been resolved, and it offers a very intimate approach to sharing. Rather than imploring you to build an army of followers, Path strives to keep things intimate by sharing photos with the people you care about most. The photo-editing features aren’t as good as the other apps mentioned here, but as a social network it is argueably a better experience than Instagram.

Friendly for Facebook is one of the newer Facebook apps. It has a pretty decent set of features as well. That includes theming, Facebook Messenger support, the ability to customize your news feed, and more. You can also download videos from Facebook. The News Feed customization allows you to filter out things like keywords. That's a great way to get rid of nonsense you don't want to see. This is definitely among the best third party Facebook apps. The pro version unlocks some of the feature and goes for $1.99.
If you work in any kind of creative field – illustration, graphic design, film, you-name-it – or just want to hang out and share content in a space designed around tasteful images and art, then you should try out Ello. It wasn’t always like this, with the social network that used to called itself a “Facebook Killer” reeling in its ambitions to something more focused and tenable.
Then there's the killer feature: You can hide sensitive content behind a button before posting, so people don't have to see your long rant, political content, or spoiler for a new episode of a TV show. The system is designed to encourage thoughtful posting—not selfish or gratuitous posts. It's even simple to contribute descriptions of images you're posting for the visually impaired, something Twitter doesn't bother turning on by default.
The biggest problem with Plurk is its lack of growth. The service still lacks some quality of life features and makes it difficult to do things like search and manage multiple conversations. This means that Plurk is widely used by long-time users. Since many of those long-time users are based in Taiwan and Asia, you might feel like a stranger in a strange land.
Coworkers.com - How's Your Work? Get And Give Professional Feedback. Analyze And Improve Your Performance. Show Off Your Expertise. Advance Your Career. Users connect with current and former colleagues for honest and, if desired, anonymous feedback on their professional profile, their overall work performance, and the quality and effectiveness of… Read more about Coworkers.com
 You will be amazed to know that Instagram allows users to upload about thousands of images on its platform within few seconds. It can instantly connect you to many other networking sites too like Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr etc for easy sharing of stories. The best part is that this platform is not just limited to Photo sharing rather it can also be used for sharing eye catching videos but the maximum supported time duration for videos is 15 seconds only. Instagram also allows people to follow others like most of the social media applications. Users can customize their account settings with ease so that privacy of all uploaded photos or videos can be maintained.

“All my work up to November of 2016 had been social media jobs, like promo posts, ads on my Instagram. Then out of nowhere, I get this huge job that had nothing to do with Instagram and I was valued off my work, versus my number [of followers]. And I was like holy crap, it really put into perspective how small of a bubble Instagram actually is.” — Andrew Kearns (490k followers)
Look familiar? We originally published this post shortly after Facebook's acquisition of and the Android launch of Instagram. We were concerned then about the influence Facebook would have on it, and now it's borne fruit in the form of an invasive terms-of-service agreement. The agreement gives Instagram rights to and ownership of your photos to sell and use in ads as they see fit. Sure, you probably don't care if they sell that photo of your coffee foam, but you and your friends may care if they sell photos of your faces or likenesses to a company that uses your shot in their ad material. Unfortunately, at this stage the only way to opt-out is to close your account and move to another service, like some of these great alternatives.
Although Vero is similar in many respects to competitors such as Facebook and Instagram (profile, structure, timeline, news feed), the platform offers some interesting unique selling points: The messages in the timeline are not pre-filtered by an algorithm, but appear in chronological order. Contacts can also be divided into four categories: 'followers', 'acquaintances', 'friends', and 'close friends'. These groups can then be selected or deselected as the target group when a post is published, so that only the desired audience is informed.
If you're friends with hundreds or thousands of people on Facebook, it understandably might not be worthwhile to put them all in your Gcal. In this case, it might be easiest just to take 20 minutes or so to add your close friends and family member's special days to your calendar. And really, did the annual onslaught of best wishes on Facebook add much to your life in the first place?
Twitter that started as the fastest growing microblogging platform almost about a decade ago seems to be dying with its lack of innovation and senseless censorship. Looking at the current stats, Twitter’s active users have been reduced to 330 million worldwide. The platform is struggling to keep its users interested. Over the past few years, it has introduced GIF and Video support, and other exciting features which were too late to introduce to Social Media. Twitter in current form seems to have no life, except for some tweets from Beyonce and Trump. It started from being an ordinary man’s social platform to a network where people sign up to read what their favorite celebrities are tweeting, and it is failing in that too, as all the celebrities are moving to better-structured platforms like Instagram. This has pushed the bluebird away from our lives and left us with no choice but to look for Twitter alternatives.
The beautifully designed Camera+ app gives users more shooting options and better effects than they'll find with the native iOS Camera app. The app's area of expertise is in snapping the best photo possible from the get-go, which it does with the aid of shooting options like the stabilizer, timer, burst mode, and separate exposure and focus points.
Phoenix is an app that can replace both your Facebook and (Facebook) Messenger applications. This app supports custom layouts and themes, while the same can be said for voice calling as well. Chat heads feature is supported by the application, and the developer has made a custom photo viewer for the application, and the same can be said for a video player as well. This app also offers a familiar design which has been somewhat adapted by the developer, of course, for the better.
Socialtext is an enterprise social network solution that aids in team collaboration and knowledge sharing. Your employees can use Socialtext to gather key customer information, share expertise and ideas, and to collaborate on tasks and projects. The enterprise social software integrates with other systems, such as your CRM and ERP, to streamline you… Read more about Socialtext
If Gab doesn’t taste like your cup of coffee with its conservative undertoned discussion on alt-right topics, Mastodon could be your next social networking home. It is an open source Twitter alternative where you have complete control over your news feed and conversations. Since it is an open source platform, it gives you the freedom to set up your own little social media platform based on your set of interests.
You may not realize this, but MySpace still exists and you can still create an account there. In fact, some people’s old MySpace accounts are still there, too. It’s not really clear if anyone’s trying MySpace again after the Facebook issues — they may be gone for good. But it might be worth checking out for nostalgia’s sake at the very least. In June, The Guardian did a story about people who still enjoy using MySpace. However, one dedicated user did say that most profiles on MySpace are abandoned. Meredith Corporation is selling the media brand Time to Salesforce’s founders, Marc and Lynne Benioff. Meredith also owns Viant, which it’s looking into selling. Since Viant owns MySpace, it’s anyone’s guess what will happen to MySpace next.
Everything has its pros and cons and so does Facebook. While Facebook has become a part of our lives and it is loved by millions, it has got its share of criticisms. It has been panned across the globe for its ever changing privacy settings, which gives Facebook total control over the information that we provide on our accounts. If you are in mood for a surprise, just compare the privacy disclaimers of Facebook from its past to present to know the difference. Facebook’s experiments with the News Feed has also not gone down too well with users. The company’s Internet.org initiative has also made sure to irk net neutrality enthusiasts. To sum it up, these are good enough reasons to need Facebook alternatives.
I'll come right out and say it: I'm not a big fan of Instagram. And no, it's not because iOS users have had their underpants in a wad over the Android release, but because for me, it really doesn't live up to the hype. (Their new privacy-invading terms of service makes them pretty unappealing, too). Here's why, and more importantly, here are some just-as-good alternatives for Android users (and some for iOS users too!) who want to take and share photos with or without those filters that make a 5-megapixel cell phone camera look like a 70s Polaroid.
Plurk features a horizontal timeline and it lets you share pictures, videos or URLs for web-based articles. The platform stimulates its users to spend more time engaging with other Plurk members through the concept of Karma, which grants you access to more emoticons. This social network can be accessed from iPhones, Android devices or from PC or Mac computers.

I'm going to end this piece by stating that I love Instagram. It is where all my clients are on a daily basis, I get to engage with new audiences, connect with new creatives, and often scroll till my thumb gets numb. But Instagram is also a victim of it's own success. The bombardment of bots (which will hopefully slow down) that auto-comment, limited search engine, and increase in sponsored posts is spoiling the broth. I've given five alternatives above that each bring something different to the party, and may create new avenues of interest and creative expression to pursue in this digital, mobile age. Please share any of your own alternatives below.

Gab.ai is a platform that is similar to Twitter. You have 300 characters with which to make your point. It has been called the Alt-Right’s social media alternative and although Gab itself doesn’t censor its users, Microsoft has threatened to take them down due to “hate speech.” A lot of folks who got banned, shadowbanned, or censored by Twitter are there.
Tweetbot is different. It’s innovative and refreshing. Tweetbot isn’t an app you use, it’s one you interact with. Everything has an animation, a sound, a beautiful interface. And true to Tapbots’ style, the sounds are subtle and pleasant – enriching the experience. For those who are suckers for design, innovation, and dare I say, personality, Tweetbot will rock your world.
The recent purge and exodus from Facebook was timed quite well, considering Steemit’s recent changes that make it faster for people to join the network. David Jefferys, Business Development Manager for Steemit, said about the timing: “Steemit is open for business and the timing couldn’t be more perfect with the fragmentation and disenfranchisement pervading the major social media networks.” 
At the end of the last year, the platform has increased the number of characters that can be used in a post, but this move did almost nothing to restore Twitter's former glory. Celebrities getting caught up in Twitter wars, fake accounts and ultra-right-wing supporters have all contributed to the current state of affairs on Twitter. Most people simply decide to use another social network that doesn't have the limitations imposed by a misguided company management and users that lack respect for everyone's right to free speech.

Believe it or not, there are plenty of social networks and messaging apps that you can use instead of Facebook. For years these networks and apps have been living in the shadows of the mighty beast that is Facebook. But now is the time to explore a better way of interacting with friends and family without the fear of your data being stolen and stored on huge servers in far flung places.
The platform primarily targets the youngsters, the majority of which are between 18-34 years of age. Snapchat features an explore section where users can access viral and premium content on the platform. Snapchat features video status update, which apparently Instagram and Whatsapp copied on their platforms. The videos are limited to 10 seconds which is fairly short, but you can tag more videos to complete the message if you require more time. The videos and photos only stay on the platform for 24 hours, and automatically gets deleted past the time. There is also no way to share someone else’s videos or photos, unlike Twitter which easily allows the option to retweet. Getting a Snapshot and sharing is only the way out.
More and more people are wanting to leave Facebook, especially after Facebook recently deleted (or “unpublished”) more than 800 pages. On Thursday, Facebook acknowledged that it purged more than 800 Facebook accounts. They said the pages were focused on politically oriented content that violated Facebook’s spam policies. Facebook said in a blog post that it was deleting 559 pages and 251 accounts “that have consistently broken our rules against spam and coordinated inauthentic behavior.” But the problem is that many owners of those pages don’t understand why they were deleted. Some pages focused on police brutality were removed. Other deleted pages, like Anti-Media, were alternative or independent news sources. And some were pages belonging to individuals who reported on the news, like Press for Truth. It’s unclear if any of these pages will be able to get their accounts back, but many account owners have publicly said they’re not sure why they were deleted. Some lost their Twitter accounts nearly simultaneously.
In March 2018 Vero jumped from 150,000 users to over 3,000,000 in the wake of Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data breach. The mobile-only platform is well-designed and has some great photo management tools, which may have led to the overall alternative/artistic vibe given off by the current user base. Their privacy policy is not as strong as some others, but they do give users plenty of control and eventually plan to charge a subscription fee in order to avoid advertising, though early adopters will get a free lifetime membership. The mobile-only platform and eventual need to pay for the service may turn some off, but Vero certainly shows some potential.
No matter which Twitter alternative you use; you would see the growing influence of Musical.ly on other platforms. Muical.ly allows you to use famous audio cues from the platform to record a video performance. After you record the video, you are given plenty of filters and effects to add upon it. It then gives you an ability to share between the other social media platforms. After you publish your performance, it goes out in the public thread. This might raise an arrow or two for its lousy privacy, but Musical.ly have its privacy policy in place, fortunately. You can quickly change the privacy setting and select who can see your posts.
Minds is a good alternative to Twitter because it doesn't have the baggage that comes with Twitter's many moderation issues. Minds has a much better transparant policy in which the things you post are actually visible to other people. Minds is hands down the best one-on-one alternative to Twitter's functions without the amateurish censoring of dissenting opinion. stefandekkers • Mar 2017 • 10 agrees and 2 disagrees Disagree   Agree

Plenty of apps will take your photos, from Apple iCloud to Dropbox to Microsoft OneDrive, but at the moment Google Photos makes most sense for most people—not least because you can store an unlimited number of photos and videos if you let it shrink your pictures down to 16 megapixels and your clips down to 1080p (you can also pay to have everything kept at full resolution).


If you think your images are sellable, EyeEm is the app for you. This smart platform allows you to publish your favorite photos, which image buyers, media outlets and big brands can then browse and potentially buy. What makes this image sharing platform different from regular stock sites is that it still has that Insta-community feel, and it’s an equally excellent place to go for inspiration.

Unfortunately, while I prefer apps like EyeEm (and I'm curious to check out Steller), the real reason that Instagram works for marketing is that it's also used by people who aren't photographers. So while you might be building a decent following on flickr or 500px, it's other photographers, who probably won't be looking to hire you to shoot their campaign/wedding. If on the other hand you're looking to make a name for yourself doing workshops/training for other photographers then maybe they're a perfect place to market yourself.


In 2016, Facebook introduced Marketplace, a feature allowing users to buy and sell items from people in their communities. As a replacement, consider Nextdoor, an app designed to keep you in the loop about what's happening in your neighborhood. It has a free and for sale section that, like Marketplace, emphasizes local offerings, and feels less sketchy than Craigslist.
While deleting Facebook might feel like a step in a more private direction, it's ultimately not going to do much to change the online digital economy that profits by collecting your personal information and selling it to data brokers. Facebook collects arguably the most private information, but plenty of other popular social networking apps like Snapchat and Twitter collect your data too. That's their entire business model: When you're not paying for a product, you are the product. Even your internet-service provider is likely collecting your personal information. In fact, through its expansive ad network, Facebook even collects info from people who aren't even on the platform.
It’s incredibly hard, and involves a good deal of luck, but if something is going to be a real Twitter successor/alternative, it needs to first and foremost find a way to get a critical mass of people using it. That can be a critical mass of a Twitter sub-culture, but it needs to be some group that moves in mass. App.Net get “Tech Twitter” to move, but it failed to get more than that (or to make them actually leave Twitter), but I don’t see that happening with Micro.Blog or Mastodon yet. I don’t know how you do that, but I think that’s how you get the momentum.
PicPlz used to be my personal favorite, until pressure from Instagram on Android forced them to shut down. In their place though, a new challenger has risen—one with an old name. Flickr's new Android app brings most—if not all—of the same features that Instagram offers and combines them with Flickr's own photo-centric social network where your photos belong to you and no one else. Flickr's new Android app lets you take photos straight from your camera and apply filters to them if you choose, then share them with friends on Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, or anywhere else you choose.
Dan Caplen were No.1 and No.2, respectively, for eight weeks in a row. The duopoly continues: Lewis Capaldi’s Someone You Loved and Calvin Harris & Rag’n’Bone Man’s Giant are No.1 and No.2, respectively, in the singles chart for the fifth straight week – the longest such freeze since early 2018 when God’s Plan by Drake and These Days by Rudimental feat. Jess Glynne, Macklemore and Dan Caplen were No.1 and No.2, respectively, for eight weeks in a row. Someone You Loved hit a new high this week, with Capaldi’s song increasing consumption 2.38% week-on-week to 66,725 units – its 12th increase in 13 weeks - surpassing its previous best of 65,216 sales registered three weeks ago. In danger of falling into ACR, after its sales fell two weeks in a row, Giant rallies 5.12% to 55,502 sales. Cumulative consumption of both tracks passed the half million mark in the week, with Someone You Loved ending on 556,623 sales, and Giant on 545,482.
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