Ello first gained popularity in the US about 3 years ago when it posed itself as a Facebook killer social network. This happened due to Facebook’s policy of forcing the members to use their legal name. Since then, it had made headlines on different occasions due to different reasons. Now that Zuckerberg’s service is facing flak, Ello is again gaining some traction. Primarily focused on artists and creative people, Ello is also ad-free. It also refrains itself from selling the information about the users to third parties. By being a niche website, Ello continues to attract users and establishing as a creators network.
Facebook has been and remains the undisputed king of the social network market. Granted, in some regions of the world, like Russia or China for example, there is a more level playing field with the success of popular alternatives to Facebook who take an equal market share. But for the most part, Facebook is the worldwide leader when it comes to social interaction online. If you’re using the platform, you’ve got no choice but to accept the network’s settings on privacy and data protection and live with them. If you don’t want to do this, then you’ll have to find a good and conservative alternative to Facebook – and either convince all of your friends, family, colleagues, and acquaintances to join you, or be prepared for the fact that your online friendship circle will be significantly reduced (to begin with at least).
Instagram, owned by Facebook has grown over the past few years by leaps and bounds. It’s an all round social network, as it lets you upload photos, short videos and even exchange texts with others. The great thing is you can set Instagram to post your updates on your Facebook, Twitter and other profiles as well. Thanks to Instagram’s popularity, there has been a rise in various similar apps, which you can check out.
This sudden purge has caused many users to be concerned that they too could be deleted without warning, and has caused businesses to pause and reconsider pushing their advertising and marketing efforts through Facebook. As a result, a number of people are considering alternative Facebook sources. (You can see a list of sites that Facebook purged on Heavy’s story here.) 
Instagram may be the alpha and omega of photographic social networks, but it’s not without its discontents. “I have an inherent distrust of Facebook,” says photographer Greg Williams. “I don’t feel like any of it is serving the user, we’re serving them and they’re selling us out to advertisers.” It’s a sentiment echoed by photographers like Erin Marie Miller and...

@Lee Fuhr: Totally agree, For us I say leave this and use a tool built for the job - i.e. slack, I don't wish to have yet one more "chat" app on my phone and other devices, slack does the job well, supports multiple accounts and a bunch of cool stuff including clickup integration - why re-invent a nice round wheel which already comes with neat white walls? :)

Diaspora is a nonprofit social networking platform similar to Instagram that you can share your status, images, and see other people’s comment on the material. This tool also ensures the users that it will not sell its member’s information to advertisers. However, unlike the other social networking programs above, it has few users. This program is not widely known in many countries.


But what if consumers are ready for a new new thing? What if smaller, higher-quality, more engaged audiences can self-assemble around a brand? What if consumers are yearning for restored trust, a semblance of privacy, and true transparency? A tall order, to be sure. But if you could leverage a trusted brand to fill the bill, is the time right for the emergence of focused branded social networks? I’m pretty sure the answer is yes.
Everything from photos and messages to mobile phone numbers of everyone in your phone. They also have all your text messages you’ve made on your cell phone! It’s crazy how much they have. And with the recent Facebookl CA scandal, people are now looking for alternatives to Facebook where privacy is respected and private information is never shared or sold to other companies or organisations.

But what if consumers are ready for a new new thing? What if smaller, higher-quality, more engaged audiences can self-assemble around a brand? What if consumers are yearning for restored trust, a semblance of privacy, and true transparency? A tall order, to be sure. But if you could leverage a trusted brand to fill the bill, is the time right for the emergence of focused branded social networks? I’m pretty sure the answer is yes.
Simple for Facebook keeps true to its namesake. It's a simple web-wrapper for the Facebook mobile site. It includes all of the basic features. That includes interacting with posts, uploading photo and video, and all of that. It also boasts support for Facebook Messenger. About the only other noteworthy thing about the app is the small selection of themes. Like we said, this one is really simple. The free version has ads. You can purchase the full version for $1.49 to get rid of them.
Here’s what Mastodon is: an open-source, community-run microblogging website. It lets you post “toots,” and you can “boost” other users’ posts. It’s mostly like Twitter, but instead of living in one place, the social network lives in different chunks, called “instances,” each with its own rules and administrators. That’s what makes up a “federation,” and it protects the integrity of the service—there is no single, central server. So, if one instance stops paying for their internet or forgets to re-up their URL, the rest are unharmed in their semi-permeable silos.

Feature for feature, Hubzilla is the best decentralized, open source competitor to Facebook. Compatibility with the Diaspora, OStatus (includes Mastodon), & ActivityPub (includes NextCloud) protocols allows it to communicate with nearly every other existing. I am happy that after he created Friendica, Mike Macgirvin & friends have continued to push forward by creating and developing Hubzilla. themagician • Mar 2018 • 1 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
[AGENDA] Apply to the School for Transnational Activism and participate in a series of 3 workshops in Warsaw, Rijeka and Palermo #migrantsrights #citizenship #feminism #gender #climatejustice #data and #digitalrights https://www.citizensforeurope.eu/agenda/call-for-applications-school-of-transnational-activism … via @EuroAlter Deadline 22 April!pic.twitter.com/MSnUOILZzo
GLOBAL NO.1 - 30 YEARS AGO... Madonna is known for her blatant style- and taboo breaks. With the release of the lead single 'Like A Prayer' for the album of the same name, she came with really heavy guns: a 180 ° image turn-around from the blonde beast to a meekly brunette ... her music changed into an exalted, hymn-like and danceable sound with religious-controversial and provocative texts. But the big bone of contention was the music video, directed by Mary Lambert. It portrays Madonna as a witness to the murder of a girl by white supremacists. While a black man is arrested for the murder, Madonna hides in a church for safety seeking strength to go forth as a witness. The clip depicts a church and Catholic symbols such as stigmata. It also features a Ku Klux Klan-style cross burning, and a dream about kissing a black saint. The Vatican condemned the video, while family and religious groups protested against its broadcast. They boycotted products by soft drink manufacturer Pepsi, who had used the song in their commercial. The company canceled their sponsorship contract with Madonna, but allowed her to retain the fee. 'Like A Prayer' became, not least because of this rather unintentionally publicity through the condemnation of parent associations and church representatives, the world's biggest hit in 1989.
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