Phoenix is an app that can replace both your Facebook and (Facebook) Messenger applications. This app supports custom layouts and themes, while the same can be said for voice calling as well. Chat heads feature is supported by the application, and the developer has made a custom photo viewer for the application, and the same can be said for a video player as well. This app also offers a familiar design which has been somewhat adapted by the developer, of course, for the better.

Metal for Facebook and Twitter is one of the up-and-coming Facebook apps. There has been a lot of positive press over the last couple of years. Like most, this is a web-wrapper (the mobile website inside of an app) with some tweaks and additional features included to improve the experience. It boasts an ad-free experience, advanced notifications, a few UI tweaks, and there are even theming options. The developer has had a good track record with updating the app with new Facebook features (along with fingerprint support) and it’s a pleasant overall experience.
Facebook noted on its blog post about the purge: “These networks increasingly use sensational political content – regardless of its political slant – to build an audience and drive traffic to their websites, earning money for every visitor to the site. And like the politically motivated activity we’ve seen, the ‘news’ stories or opinions these accounts and Pages share are often indistinguishable from legitimate political debate. This is why it’s so important we look at these actors’ behavior – such as whether they’re using fake accounts or repeatedly posting spam – rather than their content when deciding which of these accounts, Pages or Groups to remove.” Facebook went on to say that many of the pages used fake accounts to make their posts appear more popular than they were, or were actually ad farms. But some owners of these pages have insisted that they don’t fall under the description that Facebook listed. Sites with conservative, liberal, and Libertarian leanings have been removed.

We Heart It is another popular image sharing platform similar to Imgur, but its content is very feminine, primarily made of inspirational photos and quotes that appeal to young women. Instagrammers who love inspirational content might really love this app not just for the content but for connecting to very positive and inspirational users in the community too.


Diaspora's key advantage is that it's based on open source software that multiple servers can run. It does not put your private information, your likes, your contacts and your photos in the hands of one corporation who then use it to increase their own private profits by selling your privacy. Diaspora is much smaller though. The UI feels more like Google Plus than Facebook. JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 8 agrees and 2 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Faster for Facebook Lite is one of the newer Facebook apps. It uses the lighter and less resource intensive Facebook Lite as its template instead of the usual Facebook. The app includes Facebook and Facebook Messenger support, it can view all kinds of content like video and GIFs, and you can change to classic Facebook mode if needed. It's a web wrapper like most Facebook apps. However, the dark mode and all-in-one experience are definitely nice. The premium version goes for $2.99 and that's a perfectly reasonable price for it. It's better than most.
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There are very successful focused business-oriented social networks. LinkedIn, for example, attracts job seekers, as does Dribbble, which bills itself as the leading destination to find and showcase creative work. Work-focused networks are thriving. Which raises the question, “Would a big media brand or a big lifestyle brand have consumer permission to found and run a tightly focused social network?”
Thanks to its distributed design and because no person owns it, it’s away from any kind of advertisement and corporate interference. After making an account, you retain the ownership of your personal data. It’s also better than Facebook for people who wish to hide their real identity as it allows pseudonyms. You can use hashtags, mentions, text formatting, etc.
Realistically, Facebook has the advantage of scale – everyone is on it, and it’s not going to be easy to get enough people to switch over to a new network to make it a viable alternative. Networks that focus on niche communities may have better luck, but for average users, the best option is probably to pick a network that appeals to you, join up, explore, and cross-post with your regular social media. Like it or not, Facebook and Twitter are dominant, and any serious competitor is going to have to integrate with them to at least some degree to make switching a softer move for the users.

One of Facebook's most useful features isn't the main app itself, but its spinoff app Messenger. But while Messenger makes it easy to chat with Facebook friends, it's also confusing and riddled with unnecessary clutter. If you're looking for a clean and easy-to-use messaging app, try Signal. It's a free, end-to-end encrypted messaging service, approved by security researchers, that sticks to the basics. There are no animated stickers or fancy chat bots, but Signal does an excellent job of keeping you securely connected to your friends and family.
As a Berlin startup, EyeEm has to follow German data protection laws, which are stricter than those in the USA. And the user-friendly presentation of data protection information on the network has also received great praise: Users have access to the full terms and conditions of the data uploaded to the site and how it will/won’t be used, but they also receive a simple, comprehensible summary of this.
I don’t expect to move over to either of these as my main social network, but Twitter’s latest waves of jack-assery has kickstarted the conversation again. There are a few problems with these other services, but the main thing is that they just haven’t managed to get enough people to stick around and use them for long. People tend to try them and bounce off them pretty quickly. I know I have bounced off each of them numerous times.

Minds is a good alternative to Twitter because it doesn't have the baggage that comes with Twitter's many moderation issues. Minds has a much better transparant policy in which the things you post are actually visible to other people. Minds is hands down the best one-on-one alternative to Twitter's functions without the amateurish censoring of dissenting opinion. stefandekkers • Mar 2017 • 10 agrees and 2 disagrees Disagree   Agree

A truly transnational campaign. Ahead of May elections @EuroAlter will send 5 caravans to 15 countries to meet social movements, NGOs, and citizens initiatives. Another Europe is not something to aspire to. But something that already exists on the ground.https://transeuropacaravans.eu/?fbclid=IwAR1GD7vRt7N5NxrEEww87vgwdO9ugI3waHFo9klWiHb-HNcmiB6nv2P2D9s …


With the increasing popularity of digital media, Facebook is also becoming fun home to all social media lovers. There are so many interesting features inside this user friendly and highly interactive platform but cons are also present. At one side, millions of users stay actively connected to Facebook but on the other side, it also faces criticism. The biggest issue is privacy control options on Facebook. Anyone can check your all details while visiting your profile and they can even download your photos without taking any permission from you. Such issues are worth considerable and this is the main reason behind why people are searching for potential Facebook Alternatives. If you are already bored with Facebook App and now want to take a step ahead to more fun then choose any of these Facebook alternatives as discussed below:

Polaroid's resurrection continued in 2016 with the release of their social multimedia platform SW/NG, and I'd put it down as one of the most under-rated social mobile platforms around. Forget Instagram Boomerangs, SW/NG brings pictures to life much in the same way Live Photos does on iPhone. Using the app feels similar to Instagram with the continued scroll of your feed, but pictures move as you scroll. The app feels cleaner than Instagram, and encourages users to think differently when composing an image given that a moving subject or background is more compelling.
If you think your images are sellable, EyeEm is the app for you. This smart platform allows you to publish your favorite photos, which image buyers, media outlets and big brands can then browse and potentially buy. What makes this image sharing platform different from regular stock sites is that it still has that Insta-community feel, and it’s an equally excellent place to go for inspiration.
Swift for Facebook Lite is among the lightest Android Facebook options. It boasts an install size of 30MB and 20MB of RAM use. The install size isn't that impressive but the RAM use is. It also boasts Facebook and Facebook Messenger features. You can do the basic stuff. That includes uploading photo/video, tagging friends, posting updates, and interacting with posts. It's not going to blow you out of the water. However, it gets you to where you need to go without taking up too many of your phone resources. You can get rid of the ads for a single $0.99 in-app purchase.
If you remember life online before the days of Friendster, Facebook, and Myspace, this might feel familiar. Everything old is new again, as pre-Mega Social Networks, social groups would gather and collaborate in semi-private spaces that they owned, like chat rooms or forums. Over time many of these social spaces often petered out because people migrated to the bigger networks like Facebook simply because they were free to use and often easier too. Hosting and running a forum, on the other hand, takes both money and time that few people are interested in spending long-term.
I don’t expect to move over to either of these as my main social network, but Twitter’s latest waves of jack-assery has kickstarted the conversation again. There are a few problems with these other services, but the main thing is that they just haven’t managed to get enough people to stick around and use them for long. People tend to try them and bounce off them pretty quickly. I know I have bounced off each of them numerous times.

As a Berlin startup, EyeEm has to follow German data protection laws, which are stricter than those in the USA. And the user-friendly presentation of data protection information on the network has also received great praise: Users have access to the full terms and conditions of the data uploaded to the site and how it will/won’t be used, but they also receive a simple, comprehensible summary of this.
If you work in any kind of creative field – illustration, graphic design, film, you-name-it – or just want to hang out and share content in a space designed around tasteful images and art, then you should try out Ello. It wasn’t always like this, with the social network that used to called itself a “Facebook Killer” reeling in its ambitions to something more focused and tenable.
Flickr is another one of the best apps like Instagram. It is a photo and video-hosting program that is acquired by Yahoo in 2005. You can easily upload, edit and share your photos and videos via this platform. It is also available on all commonly used devices such as Android, iOS, Windows, and Linux. What makes Flickr different compared to Instagram is that it focuses on the appreciation of photography. If you are a photo enthusiast, this community is absolutely for you.
EyeEm lets users snap new photos directly, or import images from the Camera Roll. There’s a feature in EyeEm, Picked by EyeEm Selects, that scans your images and picks out photos with the highest aesthetic score, according to their algorithm. It’s safe and completely private, since the scanning is just done on your mobile device, not on their servers.

Flickr has had its ups and downs in the last few years, but the photo hosting service is worth considering as a way to edit and share images when you're on the go. With the Flickr app, you can shoot, upload, and geo-tag your photos. It has an easy-to-use interface and acts as a simple tool for moving photos you shoot on your phone to the cloud. Additionally, the Flickr app lets you apply a few filters and a caption, and also lets you share with Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or email. It doesn't have as many editing bells and whistles as some of the other Instagram alternatives, but if you're looking for a simple photo-sharing app that offers basic photo enhancements, this is the app for you.
We would much rather prefer to use specialized tools (Google Hangouts Chat, Microsoft Teams, Slack, Atlassian Stride) that focus on being a communication hub and integrate with all the other software we use like erp, crm etc. So a focus on integrating existing tools would be very much preferred. And if you really would like to built a chat platform like e.g. Asana with the chance of being subpar, then please make it optional with the possibility to toggle it off.
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