Minds enables growth of connections to occur quickly if you are highly involved on the site and produce good content, when taking into consideration the quantity of users on the site. Boosting of content and profile/channel views can be achieved (via a points system) and not merely bought. Minds also clearly rewards users with points for using the social media site itself, whether in accessing the site each hour or in uploading rich media content such as graphics or videos, unlike Facebook. Guest • Mar 2017 • 3 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Gab has started with a distinctive motive of promoting free speech, and still successfully manages to escape the rightist policies that rule the other social media networks. This is represented by its Pepe frog logo. The CEO of Gab, Andrew Torba aptly describes it as the ‘left-leaning Big social monopoly.’ Being a complete free speech platform has put Gab in a unique position, and also in troubles.
If you remember life online before the days of Friendster, Facebook, and Myspace, this might feel familiar. Everything old is new again, as pre-Mega Social Networks, social groups would gather and collaborate in semi-private spaces that they owned, like chat rooms or forums. Over time many of these social spaces often petered out because people migrated to the bigger networks like Facebook simply because they were free to use and often easier too. Hosting and running a forum, on the other hand, takes both money and time that few people are interested in spending long-term.
With the increasing popularity of digital media, Facebook is also becoming fun home to all social media lovers. There are so many interesting features inside this user friendly and highly interactive platform but cons are also present. At one side, millions of users stay actively connected to Facebook but on the other side, it also faces criticism. The biggest issue is privacy control options on Facebook. Anyone can check your all details while visiting your profile and they can even download your photos without taking any permission from you. Such issues are worth considerable and this is the main reason behind why people are searching for potential Facebook Alternatives. If you are already bored with Facebook App and now want to take a step ahead to more fun then choose any of these Facebook alternatives as discussed below:
MeWe’s Alexa ranking is lower than Steemit’s, coming in at 28,506 globally and 7,300 in the U.S. But it’s definitely growing in interest. David Westreich from MeWe shared some interesting statistics about the site with Heavy. MeWe currently has more than 70,000 groups, and it’s available on iOS, Android, and Desktop in eight languages. MeWe is currently the number 6 trending app in the Google Play Store. Its global appeal is seen in that it ranked number one as the most downloaded app in Saudi Arabia last month.

In March 2018 Vero jumped from 150,000 users to over 3,000,000 in the wake of Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data breach. The mobile-only platform is well-designed and has some great photo management tools, which may have led to the overall alternative/artistic vibe given off by the current user base. Their privacy policy is not as strong as some others, but they do give users plenty of control and eventually plan to charge a subscription fee in order to avoid advertising, though early adopters will get a free lifetime membership. The mobile-only platform and eventual need to pay for the service may turn some off, but Vero certainly shows some potential.

Unlike Twitter, Instagram doesn’t have a word limit on its posts, although the users insist that there is a cap after 2,200 characters, which is relatively long anyway. Instagram allows three types of posts: picture, video, and GIF. It also features hashtags and allows up to 30 hashtags on a single post. There is a Direct Message facility to send texts, photos, videos, GIFs and stickers to anyone on the platform, even Beyonce. Addition to that, it has Stories, which is a status update with photos and videos with 24 hours of life, after which they are automatically deleted.
Instagram's popularity with photographers is incomparable. What is essentially a free portfolio building app disguises itself as a powerful marketing tool to connect with prospective clients, but it suffers at times due to its sheer size and scope. Maybe you're bored of sieving through lame #goals and #inspiration posts, and want to know what mobile friendly alternatives are out there? Well folks, I'm here to tell you.

DeviantArt is the perfect platform for artists, who want to showcase their art galleries to the world. It has a great community of artists you can interact with and along with that you get to see some great art. There are a number of features that aim at making life easier for artists and moreover, it also makes sure the artists get their due credit.
Some Facebook alternatives focus more on local features. Nextdoor is about connecting users with the people in their real-life community – where they live – while Raftr takes the approach of linking people who are interested in the same topics or activities, wherever they are in the world. Boot-sale app Shpock, meanwhile, already arguably does a better job than Facebook’s Marketplace feature at being a more-local eBay.
Friendly for Facebook is one of the newer Facebook apps. It has a pretty decent set of features as well. That includes theming, Facebook Messenger support, the ability to customize your news feed, and more. You can also download videos from Facebook. The News Feed customization allows you to filter out things like keywords. That's a great way to get rid of nonsense you don't want to see. This is definitely among the best third party Facebook apps. The pro version unlocks some of the feature and goes for $1.99.
In the last quarter of 2017, Twitter had only 330 million users, much less than Facebook that had 2,07 billion users or Instagram that had approximately 700 million users over that same period. Despite being easy to use and a powerful tool for reaching like-minded people or potential customers for your company's products Twitter is slowly losing the reputation it once had.
Then there's the killer feature: You can hide sensitive content behind a button before posting, so people don't have to see your long rant, political content, or spoiler for a new episode of a TV show. The system is designed to encourage thoughtful posting—not selfish or gratuitous posts. It's even simple to contribute descriptions of images you're posting for the visually impaired, something Twitter doesn't bother turning on by default.

Gab has a strong commitment to ensuring freedom of expression for it's users. It is continually improving the it's usability and has a growing userbase of individuals. Unlike Twitter you get 300 characters, the ability to downvote posts and no ads. It's like Twitter before Jack become CEO again and started shadowbanning, deverifying and banning certain users for their politics. Guest • Sep 2018 • 2 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
My American cousins would describe this selection to be "out of left-field" and rightly so. Steller is more of a story sharing app, and at it's best combines excellent photography paired with engaging narratives. Stellar's story building tools are template based, simple to use and make your content look slick very quickly. It has a similar feed scroll feel to Instagram, but clicking on a title page lets you delve into an in-depth project rather than just a collection of hashtags and comments.
Monitor what people are saying online about your market, brand, product/service and competitors. Generate leads and increase sales through social media by connecting to people at their point of need. Organically market your product on social media by participating in conversations with your potential customers, existing customers and influential opi… Read more about Beevolve
I don’t expect to move over to either of these as my main social network, but Twitter’s latest waves of jack-assery has kickstarted the conversation again. There are a few problems with these other services, but the main thing is that they just haven’t managed to get enough people to stick around and use them for long. People tend to try them and bounce off them pretty quickly. I know I have bounced off each of them numerous times.
Last year, we launched YouTube Go in India, a brand new app built from the ground up to unlock the power of YouTube for the next generation of users. Since then, we've also launched YouTube Go in 14 additional countries, including Indonesia, Nigeria and Thailand, and we've seen firsthand the impact that bringing more people into the world of video can have.
But what if consumers are ready for a new new thing? What if smaller, higher-quality, more engaged audiences can self-assemble around a brand? What if consumers are yearning for restored trust, a semblance of privacy, and true transparency? A tall order, to be sure. But if you could leverage a trusted brand to fill the bill, is the time right for the emergence of focused branded social networks? I’m pretty sure the answer is yes.
We love the clean and simple layout and the back to basics concept. There are no hashtags and it’s not about collecting heart-shaped likes: the focus is purely on sharing beautiful work with people who appreciate photography. The curated collections are a great place to find inspiration for your next shoot, and 500px actively encourage open and honest feedback with the aim of helping users improve their work. These collections are put together by fellow photographers and are broken down into categories such as people and nature, so you can delve into what you love without sifting through the rest.
Minds looks very similar to Facebook in some ways. Each user has a profile page with a header and a profile photo. You can add stories, images, or status updates just like on Facebook, and users can leave comments, share your posts, or vote them up or down. There’s also a newsfeed, where you can see what other people you’re following have posted. You can also create your own blog or group. However, Minds is different in other ways. As one Minds user, OWNtheNWO, pointed out to me on Minds, “liking” a comment or post doesn’t weigh it in importance like it does on Facebook — they still remain strictly in chronological order. Minds also has a blog system similar to Blogspot, in which you can paywall your content. And you can exchange your Minds tokens on the Etherium blockchain for ETH, and then exchange those into whatever you wish, but the tokens aren’t worth a lot yet.
Instagram, owned by Facebook has grown over the past few years by leaps and bounds. It’s an all round social network, as it lets you upload photos, short videos and even exchange texts with others. The great thing is you can set Instagram to post your updates on your Facebook, Twitter and other profiles as well. Thanks to Instagram’s popularity, there has been a rise in various similar apps, which you can check out.
Although Vero is similar in many respects to competitors such as Facebook and Instagram (profile, structure, timeline, news feed), the platform offers some interesting unique selling points: The messages in the timeline are not pre-filtered by an algorithm, but appear in chronological order. Contacts can also be divided into four categories: 'followers', 'acquaintances', 'friends', and 'close friends'. These groups can then be selected or deselected as the target group when a post is published, so that only the desired audience is informed.
Unlike Twitter, Tumblr does not really have any hard restrictions on the users, apart from some policies preventing self-harm and suicide. A platform is an excellent place for businesses and advertisers for its visual nature. It supports photos, GIFs, Videos, audios, chats, quotes, links and everything that you can create with them as long as you do not violate its guidelines. Tumblr also provides needful tools to create interactive content that you can use for online promotion of a brand. It also features an integration with Google Analytics to track your posts’ performance.
At the end of the last year, the platform has increased the number of characters that can be used in a post, but this move did almost nothing to restore Twitter's former glory. Celebrities getting caught up in Twitter wars, fake accounts and ultra-right-wing supporters have all contributed to the current state of affairs on Twitter. Most people simply decide to use another social network that doesn't have the limitations imposed by a misguided company management and users that lack respect for everyone's right to free speech.
Facebook hasn't been very fun for the last few years. From political fighting to fake news to privacy concerns, many users are logging on less and others are deleting their accounts altogether. For those who primarily use Facebook today but are looking for alternatives, we've put together a list of the best options—from the most popular challengers to a few of the latest upstarts.
Simple for Facebook actually comes in two options, “Simple Free” and “Simple Pro”, both of which are linked down below. The free variant of the app comes with ads, while the paid does not, not to mention that you’re getting a number of additional options in the Pro version which costs $4. There are a number of themes available in this app, while you can also pin pages, groups, and more if you want.
App.Net was, I think, the closest we’ve come to a good Twitter alternative, and it came out back in 2012. It did basically everything Twitter did, but nicer. It had a decent web experience and a great selection of third party apps up and running within weeks of launch. And while it was a paid service (and maybe therefore doomed from the start), tons of people in the tech community went there and were having lively discussions. My App.Net feed was a joy to browse, and most of my Twitter friends were there. Oh yeah, and it was an app platform that let some devs build off their back end in interesting ways.
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