IMDB is the go-to website for movie lovers and deservedly so. It’s a great website where you can read reviews of a movie from various users and rate movies you’ve just watched. Along with that, you can also discuss various movies on the “Message Board” with the very cool community. There’s also IMDBPro, if you want to get in touch with an actor or artist.
For years, Plurk offered the service that is nearly identical to the ones provided by Twitter, and it increased the number of character you can use in a post to 360 just a few years ago. Nearly 70% of all the traffic on the platform comes from Taiwan, so if you are targeting markets in Western Europe or the United States, Plurk may not be the best social network for you.
It brings the best of both Instagram and Facebook together into one beautiful app for sharing everything from photos and videos, to music and books. And if you ever find yourself overwhelmed with too many friends on Path, you can take advantage of the convenient "Inner Circle" feature to bring you back to your connections with those you care about most.
The aptly named Hipster borrows a lot from Instagram, including the snappy photo shooting and all of the great filters you can apply to your photos. Hipster also allows you to add text captions to your photo "postcards" before sharing them, and then post your photos to Twiter, Facebook, Flickr, or Tumblr for others to see. It's fast, easy to use, and probably the simplest to get started with in the roundup.

Here's what I think you'll find: Mastodon users are nice people. The wider federated network has posts in English, Japanese, Spanish, and from techy open source enthusiasts. It's way more queer and trans-friendly. Neurodivergent users are out and proud. Furries are all about it. I'm seeing more and more amazing artists posting their work. Sex workers exiled from other social media have even made their home on a Mastodon instance.


When it comes to searching for additional sources of income to finance the project, Ello’s creators are rather creative: they have plans to begin generating revenue through user transactions carried out on their network – so by taking a commission on CD sales, for example. One of Ello’s principles is that its users aren’t obliged to use their real names, which had previously been the case at Facebook and caused outrage. When it first started out, Ello was a closed network, only accessible through an invitation to join from a registered user. This has since been relaxed, and today Ello is available for all interested parties. Critics of the site claim that Ello can’t really be considered a true Facebook alternative because it’s lacking many of the basic functions required to compete. For example, private communication between users via a chat box function is currently not possible. Ello’s focus instead is on high-quality content for all to see, making it an excellent environment for artists and photographers. Users from creative backgrounds are often attracted by Ello’s simple, minimalistic design, leaving lots of space for user posts to shine.
Minds is a Facebook clone of sorts that is encrypted, open source, and focuses extensively on free speech. Recently, the site rolled out crypto tokens so users can be rewarded for their participation. You’re rewarded with tokens for your participation, and you can exchange tokens to gain more views if you prefer. You can also send tokens to other channels as tips or for subscriptions.  Learn more about how Minds’ tokens work in Heavy’s story here. If tokens aren’t your thing, you can still use Minds solely for its Facebook alternative option.
Now to Steemit. They claim to prevent spammers from posting excessively they limit your posts. Want to upload and share some photos or maybe use the connected DTube ,YouTube alternative, to upload a video go right ahead. You will quickly be silenced and forbidden from posting any further unless you are willing to pay. If you become popular this will go away some due to the fact that you will get more people liking your content and it will give you more “steem power” so much like high school if you are popular you can share your opinion, but if you are not be prepared to pay if you want to comment on that post. This along with the fact that 80-90% of the content is about crypto currency and people talking about Whales while telling minnows to shut up and a two week wait to even set up your account bored me very quickly. It is a horrible platform for anyone other then those who want to eat, think, dream, and talk about crypto 24/7 and who are willing to wait ages to be popular enough to talk about it freely.

Periscope is an app available on Android and iOS that lets you livestream videos to social media. The live streaming is not limited to reporters or media but anyone. Basically, anyone can live stream anything through the app and it is integrated with Twitter nicely. Its social features like interactions and the great comments section make it a great live streaming app. The app was recently acquired by Twitter, so you can expect it to grow immensely in the future.
Plenty of apps will take your photos, from Apple iCloud to Dropbox to Microsoft OneDrive, but at the moment Google Photos makes most sense for most people—not least because you can store an unlimited number of photos and videos if you let it shrink your pictures down to 16 megapixels and your clips down to 1080p (you can also pay to have everything kept at full resolution).
LinkedIn has been a popular platform for professionals and it continues to remain so. LinkedIn gives you the ability to interact with other professionals, recruit employees and find jobs. It’s also great if you want to be up to date on the latest business and industry news. There’s also LinkedIn Pulse if you want to share new ideas with other big names of the industry.
@Zach Snader I actually somewhat disagree with @Lee Fuhr. I think this would be a great feature. I like Slack, but at the same time I don't. I like it because i know how to use it, but when dealing with teams and clients (especially), some people may not understand how to use Slack. I've seen it many times with people in my circles. For example courses and memberships held within Slack. Navigating the interface was too difficult for some people and they didn't know how to reply and keep a conversation in one thread. And many people complained about it. The idea isn't to compete with Slack, but to innovate and create something that caters to those who aren't necessarily Slack's ideal users.
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