Honestly! I was thinking of leaving Twitter but what’s really the alternative? I get the news faster there than anywhere else; I have been able to pretty much choose the information I get on my timeline ( which is all in one place at the same time if I want to see it); I can block out the deplorables (yeah, I said it!)...so what is a REAL alternative? Although I would leave in a heartbeat because of the continued support of Alex Jones and his ilk...and go to what?

I’m having a similar problem with Facebook. I have an assistant who was supposed to conduct a Facebook campaign for me; she still hasn’t started but in the meantime, she told me she couldn’t conduct the campaign unless I gave her my Facebook log-in info., which to my sorrow I gave to her. Now, I can’t get into my Facebook account. They’ve asked for documents to prove who I am and, like you, I don’t like the invasion of privacy. They have a second level of documents that they will supposedly accept, such as library cards, professional membership cards, and health insurance cards which don’t have the kind of personal information that I am unwilling to share. When I sent them these, they e-mailed me to say I hadn’t sent the kinds of documents they require (untrue) and when I e-mailed them in response, well, they have not responded to me and I am still locked out of my account. BIG BUMMER. I also don’t like the uses that Facebook has allowed, such as influencing elections and recently, allowing the U.S. government to pursue certain types of suspected mis-deeds through Facebook. When/if I can get back in, I am very seriously considering deleting my Facebook account and finding an alternative.

Facebook 2004 Around 2.1 billion active users Personalized advertising Facebook’s constant troubles with data protection and claims to a lack of paid tax have damaged its reputation greatly in recent years. It openly admits to using user information to run targeted advertising campaigns, and it gives users the option to hand their Facebook data on to other third parties in exchange for faster registration on external sites


Instagram is really best known for engaging the "hipster photo" scene, an appropriate term when you consider the irony involved in retro-looking images being produced digitally. Instagram's cheesy, low-grade filter effects, which some shutterflies simply abhor, let anyone with an iPhone or Android phone turn their photos back 40 years. And who could resist that slightly fuzzy 70s haze appeal (answer: anyone with an appreciation for photography as an artform).

It's full of inspiration, it's clean and it's wonderfully simple to use. If you are looking for a unique way of to publish a collection of images and give them an editorial feel very quickly, Steller is the place to be. Steller has also been slow in building an active following, but much like SW/NG, I hope that the developers persist as there is certainly enough room in the market for well thought out image sharing apps like Steller.


All of this stuff was total catnip for me. After all, what Twitter does isn't that impressive. If anything, Twitter's made its elegant platform significantly worse over the last few years, changing the "favorite" icon, introducing a higher character count, pushing obnoxious "suggestions," and messing up the chronological timeline in favor of an algorithmically-generated one. And then there’s the user-hostile API changes that might spell doom for third-party Twitter clients. It's no wonder that even loyal users are fed up.
The app supports 14 different filters, 15 photo borders, and operates a social stream much like Twitter where you can @-reply other users and follow # hashtags to see photos of specific places, topics, or events. You even get the missing-from-Instagram tilt-shift option for your shots, in rectangular, elliptical, circular, and parallel varieties. Finally, you can also edit your photos—crop them, rotate them, edit the contrast or color balance, whatever you choose. It's also available for both Android and IOS, and with the number of features it's packed with, it's surprising it's not more popular than Instagram.
I’ve reviewed VSCO before, and I personally think it’s a great platform. VSCO is about sharing creativity, and it’s not about collecting likes, hearts, or comments. You can favorite and republish photos you like, but the main goal is to share your photos with like-minded creators, and find inspiration in the community.  VSCO is a camera, editor, and platform in one. | VSCO – Free
Although Vero is similar in many respects to competitors such as Facebook and Instagram (profile, structure, timeline, news feed), the platform offers some interesting unique selling points: The messages in the timeline are not pre-filtered by an algorithm, but appear in chronological order. Contacts can also be divided into four categories: 'followers', 'acquaintances', 'friends', and 'close friends'. These groups can then be selected or deselected as the target group when a post is published, so that only the desired audience is informed.
Upvote! If ClickUp implements an effective chat function, just like Slack, then I am going to ditch Slack entirely and migrate my team to ClickUp once and for all. Slack is a simple idea (compared to something like Git), but has achieved tremendous success because it fulfills an essential and important need for running any kinds of businesses or organizations. Of course, its sophistication makes it a better tool than alternative solutions like whatsapp. But it is still a pain in the neck to go back and forth between Slack and ClickUp or another management tool. I seriously feel that ClickUp has the potential to compete with Slack. I also feel the philosophy of the ClickUp is compatible with this model of combining communication with project management. You care about UX, and not just what you could make and sell. From a user's perspective, I'd like to have a tool where I could talk to my team members and manage projects/tasks at the same time.
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