Plenty of apps will take your photos, from Apple iCloud to Dropbox to Microsoft OneDrive, but at the moment Google Photos makes most sense for most people—not least because you can store an unlimited number of photos and videos if you let it shrink your pictures down to 16 megapixels and your clips down to 1080p (you can also pay to have everything kept at full resolution).


But what if consumers are ready for a new new thing? What if smaller, higher-quality, more engaged audiences can self-assemble around a brand? What if consumers are yearning for restored trust, a semblance of privacy, and true transparency? A tall order, to be sure. But if you could leverage a trusted brand to fill the bill, is the time right for the emergence of focused branded social networks? I’m pretty sure the answer is yes.
Minds does a little bit of everything, and its open-source, privacy-oriented, community-owned platform has actually attracted quite a few users. It has most of the standard Facebook features – profiles, timelines, media sharing, messaging, etc. But it also has hints of Reddit and Medium.com, with its content curation features and emphasis on original blogging content (which can be monetized using the site’s cryptocurrency tools).
Give plates a try , Plates allows you to create “Plates” and then share photos and videos with your friends, family, and the world. Users can allow others to be collaborators in their plates which allows them to add content in the Plates, as well. These plates allow for a unique experience when multiple collaborators come together. Create plates for your trips, ideas, projects or anything that floats your boat…. add some collaborators, and watch as your plate grows with unique content from all your publishers. There are 2 types of plates Public and Private .
Karolis Rimkus began building his successful dropshipping store through influencer marketing: “At first I did a lot of influencer outreach. I would offer micro influencers, people with like 8,000 followers, an item they could make a giveaway with, or just send them a few free items in exchange for mentions. It worked, and I was growing and making sales.”
No corporate censorship. As Big Tech®™? censors and deplatforms more users for the tiniest of infractions, Gab will grow. It has its issues (UI needs improvement, needs a “media” tab like Twitter has). I’ve had my account for two years. Not a single lockout, suspension, or forced deletion of my posts. I’m done with Twitter. Guest • Aug 2018 • 12 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Everything has its pros and cons and so does Facebook. While Facebook has become a part of our lives and it is loved by millions, it has got its share of criticisms. It has been panned across the globe for its ever changing privacy settings, which gives Facebook total control over the information that we provide on our accounts. If you are in mood for a surprise, just compare the privacy disclaimers of Facebook from its past to present to know the difference. Facebook’s experiments with the News Feed has also not gone down too well with users. The company’s Internet.org initiative has also made sure to irk net neutrality enthusiasts. To sum it up, these are good enough reasons to need Facebook alternatives.
Some argue that the only reason Twitter is holding onto 330 million users is because the 45th POTUS uses the platform. But Donald Trump isn’t the worst person on the social network. Trolls, extremists of all political and religious persuasions, terrorists, criminals, mob rule and partisanship… and then there’s virtue signaling celebrities, splitting their audience with a typical lack of self-awareness.

Believe it or not, there are plenty of social networks and messaging apps that you can use instead of Facebook. For years these networks and apps have been living in the shadows of the mighty beast that is Facebook. But now is the time to explore a better way of interacting with friends and family without the fear of your data being stolen and stored on huge servers in far flung places.

You can capture and edit images in the app, and there are plenty of filters on offer, but the main aim is to share your content. Followers can favorite your images and can also republish them, but there are no options for comments and there is less of a focus on winning ‘likes’. In fact, the amount of followers that every user has is hidden, so it’s a completely level playing field for novices and professionals alike. The ‘discover’ section of the app makes it easy to find and follow photographers, making it a great place to gather inspiration and broaden your photography skills.
If all that has you thinking about deleting Facebook entirely, you're far from alone. (Quitting the social network is also somewhat of a first-world privilege, since for many people Facebook functions as the entire internet itself.) But going cold turkey can be hard; Facebook actually provides useful services sometimes, and there's no one-for-one replacement.
You’ll need a server for this, as per our guide to creating your own Mastodon instance Your Own Social Network: How to Set Up a Mastodon Instance on Linux Your Own Social Network: How to Set Up a Mastodon Instance on Linux Twitter's echo chamber is stifling discussion. If you want to get people talking, you can create your own social network with Mastodon. All you need is a web domain and server to get started... Read More .
These decentralized networks run on open-source software, which means anyone can contribute to the software to make it better, or download the code and modify it for their own instance. The software being open source doesn’t guarantee that the code itself is any more or less secure than the proprietary software that runs private social networks, but one of the main benefits of an open source platform is that anyone who has the technical knowledge can look “under the hood” and see exactly how Mastodon or Diaspora works.
Another worry with deleting Facebook is that without it, you won't be able to remember anyone's birthday. Luckily, there's a way to export your friends' birthdays directly from Facebook before you delete your account. First, log into the social network, then click Events on the left-hand side. Toward the bottom, there's an option to add events to your calendar of choice, like Microsoft Outlook, Google Calendar, or Apple Calendar. There, tap "Learn More." You'll be led to a full set of instructions for how to export all your friends' birthdays.

@Corvin Adkins: I completely agree. My team and I use Podio and the internal chat is useful for general communication. And even though it integrates with Slack, I don't want my team to have to switch between apps to chat. It would be counter productive. We would love to migrate to Clickup but wouldn't be able to until it had the current features that our team is using on Podio at minimum.
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