This is the only app that you have to pay for on our list, but according to the creators you’ll be treated as a priority rather than a product because of this. There’s a 14 day free trial available so you can play around with the features on offer, but if you want to be part of their community it’ll cost you between $47.88 per year for the basic package and $359.88 per year for the business package which provides you with all the tools you need to make your account a professional, client friendly portfolio.
PicPlz used to be my personal favorite, until pressure from Instagram on Android forced them to shut down. In their place though, a new challenger has risen—one with an old name. Flickr's new Android app brings most—if not all—of the same features that Instagram offers and combines them with Flickr's own photo-centric social network where your photos belong to you and no one else. Flickr's new Android app lets you take photos straight from your camera and apply filters to them if you choose, then share them with friends on Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, or anywhere else you choose.
Facebook noted on its blog post about the purge: “These networks increasingly use sensational political content – regardless of its political slant – to build an audience and drive traffic to their websites, earning money for every visitor to the site. And like the politically motivated activity we’ve seen, the ‘news’ stories or opinions these accounts and Pages share are often indistinguishable from legitimate political debate. This is why it’s so important we look at these actors’ behavior – such as whether they’re using fake accounts or repeatedly posting spam – rather than their content when deciding which of these accounts, Pages or Groups to remove.” Facebook went on to say that many of the pages used fake accounts to make their posts appear more popular than they were, or were actually ad farms. But some owners of these pages have insisted that they don’t fall under the description that Facebook listed. Sites with conservative, liberal, and Libertarian leanings have been removed.
I just reported something really scary and vile on FB. They had their “experts” tell me it’s well within their community guidelines. It was publicly calling white extremists to prepare for a “race war.” Facebook is fine with that. I’m OUT. I need to do it gradually, so I can take some of my network with be – but this, on top of selling my information, on top of helping Russia elect Trump…Screw this platform. What works for you guys?
From the planning side, collecting peoples' contact info can be a pain, sure. But that's a one-time bother. From there, use Paperless Post for beautiful and functional email invites and RSVP tracking. And for more rote calendar-coordination, use Doodle to find the best day for a dinner or meeting that works for everyone. The site lets each guest respond with a time that works for them, so you can easily figure out how best to accommodate everyone's schedule.
When someone runs their own instance of Mastodon or Diaspora, it becomes like their own clubhouse, where they can set their own themes for the group and rules. Though most of these spaces are very open for anyone to join, these decentralized social networks often center around a similar identity, interest, or cause specifically to filter their membership to like-minded folks.
The two main ones I see are Micro.blog and Mastodon. Micro.blog is the more popular one right now, it seems, but Mastodon has its fair share of loyal fans. I personally have accounts with both other services, but I don’t really use them reliably. Mastodon because I can’t find anyone on there, and Micro.blog because I don’t like any of the iOS apps available for it.
StatusNet funktioniert für den Anwender wie Twitter – oft funktionieren sogar die gleichen Clients mit Twitter und StatusNet. Administratoren können sich aber selbst einen Server einrichten und sind damit nicht direkt abhängig vom Funktionieren einer zentralen Infrastruktur. Wer will, kann sogar einen Twitter‐​ähnlichen Dienst nur für den internen Gebrauch zum Beispiel in einer Firma einrichten.
I'm going to end this piece by stating that I love Instagram. It is where all my clients are on a daily basis, I get to engage with new audiences, connect with new creatives, and often scroll till my thumb gets numb. But Instagram is also a victim of it's own success. The bombardment of bots (which will hopefully slow down) that auto-comment, limited search engine, and increase in sponsored posts is spoiling the broth. I've given five alternatives above that each bring something different to the party, and may create new avenues of interest and creative expression to pursue in this digital, mobile age. Please share any of your own alternatives below.
The problem is that Twitter does not preserve your privacy when you Tweet. Firstly, all your connections, who you follow and what you like or retweet is used as a way of profiling you. Secondly, all information about you can be subpoenad very easily. Twister is an alternative that does preserve your privacy and distributes info in a way that isn't centralized for one person/company to give away to others. JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 1 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree

There’s no end-to-end encryption on either platform’s private messaging at the moment, and to be fair there isn’t for Twitter or Facebook either (though Facebook is rumored to be looking into it for their Messenger). Both Mastodon and Diaspora are built on the idea that the conversations happening are meant to be public, so the privacy emphasis is on keeping user data in user ownership and out of advertiser’s hands, not keeping conversations out of the public eye.
Upvote! If ClickUp implements an effective chat function, just like Slack, then I am going to ditch Slack entirely and migrate my team to ClickUp once and for all. Slack is a simple idea (compared to something like Git), but has achieved tremendous success because it fulfills an essential and important need for running any kinds of businesses or organizations. Of course, its sophistication makes it a better tool than alternative solutions like whatsapp. But it is still a pain in the neck to go back and forth between Slack and ClickUp or another management tool. I seriously feel that ClickUp has the potential to compete with Slack. I also feel the philosophy of the ClickUp is compatible with this model of combining communication with project management. You care about UX, and not just what you could make and sell. From a user's perspective, I'd like to have a tool where I could talk to my team members and manage projects/tasks at the same time.
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