Pros & Cons Using Twitter For eLearning: What eLearning professionals should know! 8 pros and 6 cons on How To Use Twitter For eLearning!advantage using twitterpros and cons of trump using twitterbenefits of twitter in educationpros and cons of twitter for businessnegatives of twitterteachers using twitter in the classroomPeople also search for ...

TweetDeck, now owned by Twitter, is a desktop powerhouse that tries to bring the same multi-column, quick filtering functionality to the iPhone. Favored by social media marketing, analyst, and engagement types because of the ability to sort, organize, manage, and push out tons of Twitter material, the approach translates down to the much smaller screen with okay but not great results.
In the last quarter of 2017, Twitter had only 330 million users, much less than Facebook that had 2,07 billion users or Instagram that had approximately 700 million users over that same period. Despite being easy to use and a powerful tool for reaching like-minded people or potential customers for your company's products Twitter is slowly losing the reputation it once had.
Trolls, haters, racists... are on every social network. Gab also have racists. Mastodon blocks nazis and allows you to create your own social network. The best alternatives to social media are web hosting sites, blogs, file uploading and file mirroring websites and link bookmarking websites. They don't store too much personal data and there is no trolls, spammers and haters.
Flickr has had its ups and downs in the last few years, but the photo hosting service is worth considering as a way to edit and share images when you're on the go. With the Flickr app, you can shoot, upload, and geo-tag your photos. It has an easy-to-use interface and acts as a simple tool for moving photos you shoot on your phone to the cloud. Additionally, the Flickr app lets you apply a few filters and a caption, and also lets you share with Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or email. It doesn't have as many editing bells and whistles as some of the other Instagram alternatives, but if you're looking for a simple photo-sharing app that offers basic photo enhancements, this is the app for you.
If you want to make your photos look great, there’s no app that I’d recommend more than Snapseed. Yes, the app has a bunch of vintage filters if you’re into that sort of thing, but there are so many ways you can edit your photos using Snapseed beyond mere filters. Selective Adjustments are a key feature that really separate Snapseed from competitors because it allows you to take complete control of your photos. There are even OS X and Windows versions of the app so you can use it on your preferred platform. Don’t let the $4.99 price tag scare you away because Snapseed for iPhone or iPad is worth every penny.
Before Snapseed there was Camera+. Its photoediting features are a lot better than Instagram’s, and even though it’s not as fully featured as Snapseed, you might like it more because it’s cheaper and bit easier to use. Other than the great filters provided, the best thing about Camera+ is the ability to capture photos by setting the exposure at a different point than the focus (something most camera apps don’t let you do). For only $0.99 Camera+ might be the most cost effective Instagram alternative.
No matter which Twitter alternative you use; you would see the growing influence of Musical.ly on other platforms. Muical.ly allows you to use famous audio cues from the platform to record a video performance. After you record the video, you are given plenty of filters and effects to add upon it. It then gives you an ability to share between the other social media platforms. After you publish your performance, it goes out in the public thread. This might raise an arrow or two for its lousy privacy, but Musical.ly have its privacy policy in place, fortunately. You can quickly change the privacy setting and select who can see your posts.
Available as a mobile app (you can run Android apps on a PC How to Emulate Android and Run Android Apps on Your PC How to Emulate Android and Run Android Apps on Your PC It's actually pretty easy to get Android apps running on your desktop or laptop! Here, we step you through the best methods. Read More ), Amino can be installed on Google Play and the Apple App Store. Its focus is similar to Mastodon: you’re given communities to join based on your interests.
If you think your images are sellable, EyeEm is the app for you. This smart platform allows you to publish your favorite photos, which image buyers, media outlets and big brands can then browse and potentially buy. What makes this image sharing platform different from regular stock sites is that it still has that Insta-community feel, and it’s an equally excellent place to go for inspiration.
With Google’s messaging apps a real mess right now (Hangouts is good but rarely used), and Facebook in charge of Instagram and WhatsApp, the other genuine alternatives are Signal and Telegram. We prefer the former for its stronger encryption, but they both do messages, calls, media, groups, and more. Whichever you pick though, you’ve then got the job of trying to get all your friends to switch too.
Tweetbot by Tapbots is it a beauty. A text review can hardly do this app justice because it is impossible to put into words how beautifully Tweetbot is made. Sure, I can describe how, at your touch, a tweet slides up revealing a navigation bar while simultaneous emitting the perfect sound. I can explain that swiping a tweet to right reveals the conversation and swiping to left displays related tweets. I can tell you about smart gestures, multiple timelines, and customizable navigation. I can even spew out a concrete list of every feature that Tweetbot includes. What I can’t provide you, however, is the experience.
Flickr is another one of the best apps like Instagram. It is a photo and video-hosting program that is acquired by Yahoo in 2005. You can easily upload, edit and share your photos and videos via this platform. It is also available on all commonly used devices such as Android, iOS, Windows, and Linux. What makes Flickr different compared to Instagram is that it focuses on the appreciation of photography. If you are a photo enthusiast, this community is absolutely for you.

Instagram's real appeal is the closed nature of its product—the fact that it's walled off by default, with no open browsing of user photos by just anyone, and before its Android release, built a brand off of being iPhone only, private, and that thing that a select few used to take photos on their phone and then, for fear that no one would see it, pushed it over to Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Flickr, or anywhere else that people actually hang out. Aside from design and marketing, there's little that makes the app special to this writer. (Your view may differ, and if so, that's cool. You should use Instagram!)

We love the clean and simple layout and the back to basics concept. There are no hashtags and it’s not about collecting heart-shaped likes: the focus is purely on sharing beautiful work with people who appreciate photography. The curated collections are a great place to find inspiration for your next shoot, and 500px actively encourage open and honest feedback with the aim of helping users improve their work. These collections are put together by fellow photographers and are broken down into categories such as people and nature, so you can delve into what you love without sifting through the rest.

We Heart It is another popular image sharing platform similar to Imgur, but its content is very feminine, primarily made of inspirational photos and quotes that appeal to young women. Instagrammers who love inspirational content might really love this app not just for the content but for connecting to very positive and inspirational users in the community too.
Thanks to its distributed design and because no person owns it, it’s away from any kind of advertisement and corporate interference. After making an account, you retain the ownership of your personal data. It’s also better than Facebook for people who wish to hide their real identity as it allows pseudonyms. You can use hashtags, mentions, text formatting, etc.
For my money, at least, I'd much rather you focus on solving the other ten zillion things than go up against Slack. You'll have a hard time displacing Slack for us, and I'm confident nearly everyone we work with would say the same. Even if we liked CU's chat, we'd still have Slack open for the other 15 teams I chat with, so we'd end up going right back to it, methinks…
×