Here’s what Mastodon is: an open-source, community-run microblogging website. It lets you post “toots,” and you can “boost” other users’ posts. It’s mostly like Twitter, but instead of living in one place, the social network lives in different chunks, called “instances,” each with its own rules and administrators. That’s what makes up a “federation,” and it protects the integrity of the service—there is no single, central server. So, if one instance stops paying for their internet or forgets to re-up their URL, the rest are unharmed in their semi-permeable silos.
PicPlz used to be my personal favorite, until pressure from Instagram on Android forced them to shut down. In their place though, a new challenger has risen—one with an old name. Flickr's new Android app brings most—if not all—of the same features that Instagram offers and combines them with Flickr's own photo-centric social network where your photos belong to you and no one else. Flickr's new Android app lets you take photos straight from your camera and apply filters to them if you choose, then share them with friends on Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, or anywhere else you choose.
It was launched recently in year 2016 but its interactive features have made it popular enough among youngsters. If you have used Muscial.ly app then Live.ly can appear like a potential competitor to that. It allows users to broadcast memorable moments from their life and people can also watch live streams at any corner of world. When you like some live streams then you can simply send “loves” to the broadcaster and update comments. It also allow users to send gift points to each other and these gift points can be bought be spending real money. You will definitely love the Daily Leaderboard feature of Live.ly that assists in easy channel shorting as per number of total “Loves” received b the broadcaster. Anyone can browse for specific categories of streams to enjoy as per mood. Live.ly also gives opportunity to initiate search for friends by using their contact numbers or usernames.
Twitter’s key advantage for me is that it just feels like the place everyone is talking. Basically everyone you want to hear from, whether they be celebrities, athletes, politicians, actors, writers, or regular old people, they’re almost certainly on Twitter. Not only are they there, but they’re active and use it as a one-stop-shop for talking about everything they’re doing. If you’re not on Twitter, you’re cutting out a main place things are announced and talked about.
Each person also has a profile page, similar to Facebook’s, where you can add a cover photo, a profile photo, and status updates. You can also add fun little anecdotes on a sidebar, including what you’re eating, drinking, reading, watching, or quoting. In that sense, it’s a little reminiscent of the features some people enjoyed on MySpace. In the other sidebar, you can share bio details like your job, college, interests, and relationship status.
Secondly, there are regular competitions or "Missions" with specific briefs. Prizes come in various forms such as being published in an exhibition, having your work used in commercial campaigns, or cold hard cash. This is a great way for marketing teams of commercial brands or exhibition curators to hunt for new, enthusiastic talent. This gives any aspiring photographer the feeling that the playing field has been leveled, and if the quality is there, then you wont be ignored.
Recent scandals with Facebook’s data protection policies have left many users feeling betrayed by the social networking giant, which has been facing accusations of failing to protect personal information from third-party use. Deleting your Facebook account is the best and most permanent way to protect your data from prying eyes. So how exactly is it done? This guide walks you through the steps to...
It's full of inspiration, it's clean and it's wonderfully simple to use. If you are looking for a unique way of to publish a collection of images and give them an editorial feel very quickly, Steller is the place to be. Steller has also been slow in building an active following, but much like SW/NG, I hope that the developers persist as there is certainly enough room in the market for well thought out image sharing apps like Steller.
You can capture and edit images in the app, and there are plenty of filters on offer, but the main aim is to share your content. Followers can favorite your images and can also republish them, but there are no options for comments and there is less of a focus on winning ‘likes’. In fact, the amount of followers that every user has is hidden, so it’s a completely level playing field for novices and professionals alike. The ‘discover’ section of the app makes it easy to find and follow photographers, making it a great place to gather inspiration and broaden your photography skills. 

“All my work up to November of 2016 had been social media jobs, like promo posts, ads on my Instagram. Then out of nowhere, I get this huge job that had nothing to do with Instagram and I was valued off my work, versus my number [of followers]. And I was like holy crap, it really put into perspective how small of a bubble Instagram actually is.” — Andrew Kearns (490k followers)
Before there was Instagram, there was Flickr. And for many of us, this was our first online portal to have ones photography critiqued. Similar to Instagram, Flickr is a photo sharing platform but has more effective search tools, especially online. There are similarities in following and being followed but does not have the same mass audience as Instagram. Most of the feedback, positive or otherwise, will likely come from other photographers rather than prospective clients. That being said, top Flickr talent is seldom ignored, and the platform has launched many a career in the world of fine art and conceptual photography.

Thanks to its distributed design and because no person owns it, it’s away from any kind of advertisement and corporate interference. After making an account, you retain the ownership of your personal data. It’s also better than Facebook for people who wish to hide their real identity as it allows pseudonyms. You can use hashtags, mentions, text formatting, etc.
Facebook 2004 Around 2.1 billion active users Personalized advertising Facebook’s constant troubles with data protection and claims to a lack of paid tax have damaged its reputation greatly in recent years. It openly admits to using user information to run targeted advertising campaigns, and it gives users the option to hand their Facebook data on to other third parties in exchange for faster registration on external sites

It may be that ditching Facebook is not the answer, but rather restricting how your data is used and shared by the company. Facebook has just made its built-in privacy and data settings easier to use, redesigning its mobile app’s settings menu. “Instead of having settings spread across nearly 20 different screens, they’re now accessible from a single place,” it explained in a blog post announcing the change.
In 2016 Apple banned gab’s mobile app on its Appstore for promoting explicit adult content. This was followed by Play Store in 2017, which banned the app for violating hate speech guidelines of Google. Google further noted during its ban that the platform failed in demonstrating a minimum required level of moderation and encouraged violence. Despite all this, Gab still shelters people who are easy on hate speech and non-art nudity. That said, you’ll have to search for things that could offend you on Gab dedicatedly, or else, it is chiefly stuffed with pop culture art, memes, and fair discussions on a variety of topics. And even if you find something that’s offensive to you, like a discussion on online anonymity, you can use the scroll button and explore some memes on Trump.
Many might not consider WhatsApp a full-fledged social media platform, but things have changed. Facebook-owned WhatsApp has made its mark in the industry with new features flooding in the App, every other month. It has recently launched video status update with customization options. It has borrowed a feature from Telegram and introduced one way broadcasting on the group chat. WhatsApp also introduced a web client to use the service through a desktop browser, which we found satisfyingly good.
The official Twitter 4.0 for iPhone has a radically overhauled user interface which, while it might potentially make tweeting more discoverable and approachable to new, mainstream users, could also annoy and alienate long time, power users. Luckily, if you're one of he annoyed, the alienated, there are a variety of alternative Twitter apps in the App Store for you to choose from. These are some of our favorites, the ones we consider the very best, most must-have third party Twitter clients for iPhone and iPad.

SteamZoo has long been touted as a great—if not better-alternative to Instagram, partially because of the way it turns editing and sharing your photos into more of a social game that's addictive to play. You can earn badges—much like FourSquare—for sharing photos, adding effects and borders, or even for taking pictures of specific subjects, like your dog or your dinner. Whether you encourage the behavior or not, StreamZoo is a pretty addictive app to use.


@Corvin Adkins: I completely agree. My team and I use Podio and the internal chat is useful for general communication. And even though it integrates with Slack, I don't want my team to have to switch between apps to chat. It would be counter productive. We would love to migrate to Clickup but wouldn't be able to until it had the current features that our team is using on Podio at minimum.
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