Are you on the hunt for a conservative Facebook alternative? While it may seem like a daunting task, you can rest assured you’re not alone. Whether it’s because of hidden terms and conditions, data protection issues, or platform rules and regulations – the reasons for finding an alternative to Facebook are common and more and more users are looking to avoid the Californian social media giant. The market for similar networks is massive, and there’s a large selection of platforms ready to accept Facebook’s digital refugees. In our guide, we’ve already introduced some of the biggest and most important social media platforms around.
Where you find all your favourite movies and video clips? Probably, on YouTube! Most of the video lovers throughout the world prefer to use YouTube as their favourite video watching and downloading site. The great news is that YouTube has received second largest search engines ranking after Google. However, YouTube is also owned by Google but still it is able to make a stand alone powerful identify among users. It is the premiere place for entertainment, marketing and sharing emotions with compelling stories. Ranging between vlogs to independent films and video clips as well as movies, everything is present on YouTube with high content quality. The only trouble you may find on YouTube videos is the annoying ads that can appear anywhere between videos. But the best solution to get rid of these unwanted ads is to switch to YouTube Red that is premium subscription plan of YouTube.

According to sources at the company, the app currently has around 22 million users (Figures accurate as of April 2017). The platform is growing, collecting big investments and extending its functions and features on a regular basis. Its basic idea is the same as Instagram’s: EyeEm is a platform made for sharing photos. Snapshots and professional images can be uploaded and then shared with the community on EyeEm and other linked networks – with a range of different filters and editing tools to add that extra star quality.
Minds enables growth of connections to occur quickly if you are highly involved on the site and produce good content, when taking into consideration the quantity of users on the site. Boosting of content and profile/channel views can be achieved (via a points system) and not merely bought. Minds also clearly rewards users with points for using the social media site itself, whether in accessing the site each hour or in uploading rich media content such as graphics or videos, unlike Facebook. Guest • Mar 2017 • 3 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Some Facebook alternatives focus more on local features. Nextdoor is about connecting users with the people in their real-life community – where they live – while Raftr takes the approach of linking people who are interested in the same topics or activities, wherever they are in the world. Boot-sale app Shpock, meanwhile, already arguably does a better job than Facebook’s Marketplace feature at being a more-local eBay.
There are over 20 different filters and borders to choose from, and you can opt to geo-tag your photos with the location where they were taken. Hipster also has a social network behind the scenes here too, and even if we don't think it's terribly useful, it's full of gorgeous photos and really intimate views of the lives of the people who use the app. Plus, it's essential for any good Instagram alternative. If you opt to join, or connect with people who are also using the app, you can look at a map of where other users near you are located and sharing their photos. Oh, and yes—this app is available for iOS and Android as well.
Swift for Facebook Lite is among the lightest Android Facebook options. It boasts an install size of 30MB and 20MB of RAM use. The install size isn't that impressive but the RAM use is. It also boasts Facebook and Facebook Messenger features. You can do the basic stuff. That includes uploading photo/video, tagging friends, posting updates, and interacting with posts. It's not going to blow you out of the water. However, it gets you to where you need to go without taking up too many of your phone resources. You can get rid of the ads for a single $0.99 in-app purchase.
Fire up the app, and when you tap to take a picture, you're shunted to your phone's default camera app to take your photo. Snap it, and you're returned to Flickr to edit it. Best of all, Flickr gives you ultimate control over the licensing of your photos. You can make them public or private, license them yourself via Getty, make them remix-friendly via Creative Commons, or keep them locked down, all rights reserved to you. And contrary to previous reports, Flickr is still a buzzing social network with thousands of users and thousands more photos.
Invitations to dinner parties; updates about work; an away day with the college football team: if you’re not using WhatsApp, you run the risk of missing out on important information. With more than a billion worldwide users to date, the app is more popular than almost any other on the market. But this networking comes with its disadvantages too: the main one being that WhatsApp shares user data...

Die besten Alternativen zu Facebook in 2019 findest du bei Alternative-zu.de. Wir haben insgesamt 72 Alternativen zu Facebook gesammelt, welche nach Plattform, Lizenzmodell und Verfügbarkeit gefiltert werden können. Von diesen 72 Alternativen sind 69 zu 100% kostenlos, 0 frei zugänglich und 3 kostenpflichtig. Weiterhin sind von diesen 72 Alternativen 42 noch verfügbar und 30 aktuell offline oder dauerhaft eingestellt. Solltest du weitere Alternativen finden, die nicht mehr verfügbar sind, kannst du uns dies einfach mitteilen und dabei helfen, die Suchergebnisse für alle Besucher zu verbessern. Zusätzlich kannst du uns weitere Alternativen zu Facebook vorschlagen, die wir dann gerne in unserer Datenbank mit aufnehmen.


With this network, you’re able to use your phone as a microphone, and record songs, bits of dialogue, and more. Uploading it to Musical.ly then attracts views, and comments and likes. It’s here where things can get a bit sticky with privacy, however. Would a parent be happy for a child’s performance (potentially wearing an outfit that emulates a star known for their sex appeal) to be publicly available online?
Invitations to dinner parties; updates about work; an away day with the college football team: if you’re not using WhatsApp, you run the risk of missing out on important information. With more than a billion worldwide users to date, the app is more popular than almost any other on the market. But this networking comes with its disadvantages too: the main one being that WhatsApp shares user data...
This is the only app that you have to pay for on our list, but according to the creators you’ll be treated as a priority rather than a product because of this. There’s a 14 day free trial available so you can play around with the features on offer, but if you want to be part of their community it’ll cost you between $47.88 per year for the basic package and $359.88 per year for the business package which provides you with all the tools you need to make your account a professional, client friendly portfolio.
Many might not consider WhatsApp a full-fledged social media platform, but things have changed. Facebook-owned WhatsApp has made its mark in the industry with new features flooding in the App, every other month. It has recently launched video status update with customization options. It has borrowed a feature from Telegram and introduced one way broadcasting on the group chat. WhatsApp also introduced a web client to use the service through a desktop browser, which we found satisfyingly good.
Pickup for the app has been slow, and I'm sure this is disappointing for Polaroid, but I implore them to continue to update the app and promote this alternative take on social media. One obvious improvement would be the ability to upload Apple Live Photos to the service rather than only being able to use the in-app camera, thus limiting what you can upload to the present moment.

Flickr also has a higher grouping called collections where albums can be grouped. I had two projects going in 2012, the Full Moon project and the Equinox/Solstice project. I grouped my monthly full moons into individual albums and for the Equinox/Solstice, spring, summer. fall, and winter had an album. The monthly full moon albums were grouped into the Full Moon collection, and the spring, summer, fall, and winter albums were grouped in the Equinox/Solstice collection.
I found it confusing to use (maybe you need to be more techy?) and was put off by the fact that I needed to log in via Twitter. Perhaps this is just so you can connect with the same people. It’s always worthwhile to look at your options. Mastodon was started by Eugen Rochko, who was fed up with the changes that Twitter was making that closely resembled the Facebook algorithms.
500px is a money making machine and reward certain types of photography. (It’s also full of bots). Flickr was great, but it’s now a dinosaur. Tumblr is owned by Verizon and crippled with bots and porn. EyeEm is great as a platform to sell your images. Unsplash has a tremendous visibility but your work is then available for free even for commercial use. Behance is great to showcase projects, but not really made for sharing single images.
Mastodon is decentralized and open to all kinds of people. It is closer to Twitter than it is to Facebook. It doesn't seem to attract the alt right like other Facebook alternatives do. I love the interface. It is very well structured and even though you join up for only one instance, you can interact with the whole world! Guest • Apr 2018 • 3 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Although Vero is similar in many respects to competitors such as Facebook and Instagram (profile, structure, timeline, news feed), the platform offers some interesting unique selling points: The messages in the timeline are not pre-filtered by an algorithm, but appear in chronological order. Contacts can also be divided into four categories: 'followers', 'acquaintances', 'friends', and 'close friends'. These groups can then be selected or deselected as the target group when a post is published, so that only the desired audience is informed.
Everything has its pros and cons and so does Facebook. While Facebook has become a part of our lives and it is loved by millions, it has got its share of criticisms. It has been panned across the globe for its ever changing privacy settings, which gives Facebook total control over the information that we provide on our accounts. If you are in mood for a surprise, just compare the privacy disclaimers of Facebook from its past to present to know the difference. Facebook’s experiments with the News Feed has also not gone down too well with users. The company’s Internet.org initiative has also made sure to irk net neutrality enthusiasts. To sum it up, these are good enough reasons to need Facebook alternatives.
If you think your images are sellable, EyeEm is the app for you. This smart platform allows you to publish your favorite photos, which image buyers, media outlets and big brands can then browse and potentially buy. What makes this image sharing platform different from regular stock sites is that it still has that Insta-community feel, and it’s an equally excellent place to go for inspiration.

But what if consumers are ready for a new new thing? What if smaller, higher-quality, more engaged audiences can self-assemble around a brand? What if consumers are yearning for restored trust, a semblance of privacy, and true transparency? A tall order, to be sure. But if you could leverage a trusted brand to fill the bill, is the time right for the emergence of focused branded social networks? I’m pretty sure the answer is yes.


Invitations to dinner parties; updates about work; an away day with the college football team: if you’re not using WhatsApp, you run the risk of missing out on important information. With more than a billion worldwide users to date, the app is more popular than almost any other on the market. But this networking comes with its disadvantages too: the main one being that WhatsApp shares user data...
Phoenix is an app that can replace both your Facebook and (Facebook) Messenger applications. This app supports custom layouts and themes, while the same can be said for voice calling as well. Chat heads feature is supported by the application, and the developer has made a custom photo viewer for the application, and the same can be said for a video player as well. This app also offers a familiar design which has been somewhat adapted by the developer, of course, for the better.

Facebook 2004 Around 2.1 billion active users Personalized advertising Facebook’s constant troubles with data protection and claims to a lack of paid tax have damaged its reputation greatly in recent years. It openly admits to using user information to run targeted advertising campaigns, and it gives users the option to hand their Facebook data on to other third parties in exchange for faster registration on external sites


For my money, at least, I'd much rather you focus on solving the other ten zillion things than go up against Slack. You'll have a hard time displacing Slack for us, and I'm confident nearly everyone we work with would say the same. Even if we liked CU's chat, we'd still have Slack open for the other 15 teams I chat with, so we'd end up going right back to it, methinks…
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