Tweetbot by Tapbots is it a beauty. A text review can hardly do this app justice because it is impossible to put into words how beautifully Tweetbot is made. Sure, I can describe how, at your touch, a tweet slides up revealing a navigation bar while simultaneous emitting the perfect sound. I can explain that swiping a tweet to right reveals the conversation and swiping to left displays related tweets. I can tell you about smart gestures, multiple timelines, and customizable navigation. I can even spew out a concrete list of every feature that Tweetbot includes. What I can’t provide you, however, is the experience.
Swift for Facebook Lite is among the lightest Android Facebook options. It boasts an install size of 30MB and 20MB of RAM use. The install size isn't that impressive but the RAM use is. It also boasts Facebook and Facebook Messenger features. You can do the basic stuff. That includes uploading photo/video, tagging friends, posting updates, and interacting with posts. It's not going to blow you out of the water. However, it gets you to where you need to go without taking up too many of your phone resources. You can get rid of the ads for a single $0.99 in-app purchase.
Twitter profiles can be customized with photos and headers. Users are also able to follow other Twitter users. Many famous people use the platform to communicate with the masses. Twitter has also become a source for news. During the 2016 United States election, more than 40 million tweets were sent about election results. One of the reasons Twitter is so popular in this regard is that breaking news can be conveyed immediately. It can often be tweeted faster than it can be reported by major news outlets.

There are very successful focused business-oriented social networks. LinkedIn, for example, attracts job seekers, as does Dribbble, which bills itself as the leading destination to find and showcase creative work. Work-focused networks are thriving. Which raises the question, “Would a big media brand or a big lifestyle brand have consumer permission to found and run a tightly focused social network?”
Each person also has a profile page, similar to Facebook’s, where you can add a cover photo, a profile photo, and status updates. You can also add fun little anecdotes on a sidebar, including what you’re eating, drinking, reading, watching, or quoting. In that sense, it’s a little reminiscent of the features some people enjoyed on MySpace. In the other sidebar, you can share bio details like your job, college, interests, and relationship status.
The recent purge and exodus from Facebook was timed quite well, considering Steemit’s recent changes that make it faster for people to join the network. David Jefferys, Business Development Manager for Steemit, said about the timing: “Steemit is open for business and the timing couldn’t be more perfect with the fragmentation and disenfranchisement pervading the major social media networks.” 
Polaroid's resurrection continued in 2016 with the release of their social multimedia platform SW/NG, and I'd put it down as one of the most under-rated social mobile platforms around. Forget Instagram Boomerangs, SW/NG brings pictures to life much in the same way Live Photos does on iPhone. Using the app feels similar to Instagram with the continued scroll of your feed, but pictures move as you scroll. The app feels cleaner than Instagram, and encourages users to think differently when composing an image given that a moving subject or background is more compelling.
MeWe hasn’t gotten quite the coverage it deserves, especially given that Tim Berners-Lee, one of the primary architects of the World Wide Web, sits on its board of advisors. Its interface is simple and intuitive, it covers all the Facebook basics, and it is dedicated to maintaining user privacy. It has advertising, but it is not targeted. They compensate for lower ad revenue by selling add-on services, like voice messaging and message encryption. It’s quite user-friendly, and you may be able to connect your Facebook and Twitter to it, though if this feature currently exists, it’s somewhat well-hidden.
This idea is antithetical to current consumer marketing ethos, which strives to reach targeted audiences at scale. If you want targeting at scale, you go to Facebook or Google. Either can give you practically everyone in America who fits your target. To be fair, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest can all serve up pretty big targeted audiences.
Pickup for the app has been slow, and I'm sure this is disappointing for Polaroid, but I implore them to continue to update the app and promote this alternative take on social media. One obvious improvement would be the ability to upload Apple Live Photos to the service rather than only being able to use the in-app camera, thus limiting what you can upload to the present moment.
Upvote! If ClickUp implements an effective chat function, just like Slack, then I am going to ditch Slack entirely and migrate my team to ClickUp once and for all. Slack is a simple idea (compared to something like Git), but has achieved tremendous success because it fulfills an essential and important need for running any kinds of businesses or organizations. Of course, its sophistication makes it a better tool than alternative solutions like whatsapp. But it is still a pain in the neck to go back and forth between Slack and ClickUp or another management tool. I seriously feel that ClickUp has the potential to compete with Slack. I also feel the philosophy of the ClickUp is compatible with this model of combining communication with project management. You care about UX, and not just what you could make and sell. From a user's perspective, I'd like to have a tool where I could talk to my team members and manage projects/tasks at the same time.
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