It brings the best of both Instagram and Facebook together into one beautiful app for sharing everything from photos and videos, to music and books. And if you ever find yourself overwhelmed with too many friends on Path, you can take advantage of the convenient "Inner Circle" feature to bring you back to your connections with those you care about most.
In the last quarter of 2017, Twitter had only 330 million users, much less than Facebook that had 2,07 billion users or Instagram that had approximately 700 million users over that same period. Despite being easy to use and a powerful tool for reaching like-minded people or potential customers for your company's products Twitter is slowly losing the reputation it once had.
Gab is free of ads. Gives people chance to earn money by offering premium content. Does not track your every move in app. Does not censor you unnecessarily. Gives you option to mute user who try to troll you. Gab offers pro subscription which self-sustains the platform without any need of advertisers dictating the direction of development of site. Guest • Sep 2018 • 1 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree

While deleting Facebook might feel like a step in a more private direction, it's ultimately not going to do much to change the online digital economy that profits by collecting your personal information and selling it to data brokers. Facebook collects arguably the most private information, but plenty of other popular social networking apps like Snapchat and Twitter collect your data too. That's their entire business model: When you're not paying for a product, you are the product. Even your internet-service provider is likely collecting your personal information. In fact, through its expansive ad network, Facebook even collects info from people who aren't even on the platform.

Flickr has had its ups and downs in the last few years, but the photo hosting service is worth considering as a way to edit and share images when you're on the go. With the Flickr app, you can shoot, upload, and geo-tag your photos. It has an easy-to-use interface and acts as a simple tool for moving photos you shoot on your phone to the cloud. Additionally, the Flickr app lets you apply a few filters and a caption, and also lets you share with Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or email. It doesn't have as many editing bells and whistles as some of the other Instagram alternatives, but if you're looking for a simple photo-sharing app that offers basic photo enhancements, this is the app for you.
My American cousins would describe this selection to be "out of left-field" and rightly so. Steller is more of a story sharing app, and at it's best combines excellent photography paired with engaging narratives. Stellar's story building tools are template based, simple to use and make your content look slick very quickly. It has a similar feed scroll feel to Instagram, but clicking on a title page lets you delve into an in-depth project rather than just a collection of hashtags and comments.
Why not have a standalone chat feature that integrates well with slack? Not sure how do-able that would be but it would be cool if you could send slack messages right from the Clickup chat session and vise versa -- sort of have them synconized. That way non-slack users still have built in chat and slack users can continue to use slack but the relevant message stream would be viewable from within the clickup chat feature. Not sure if it's possible ... maybe I'm dreaming ...
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