Metal for Facebook and Twitter is one of the up-and-coming Facebook apps. There has been a lot of positive press over the last couple of years. Like most, this is a web-wrapper (the mobile website inside of an app) with some tweaks and additional features included to improve the experience. It boasts an ad-free experience, advanced notifications, a few UI tweaks, and there are even theming options. The developer has had a good track record with updating the app with new Facebook features (along with fingerprint support) and it’s a pleasant overall experience.
I switched to facebook because it was much more simple than myspace and didn't have all the crap myspace does. But facebook is making the same mistake myspace did by adding applications that can post and even have full control over your account. Also it seems facebook is filling up with a bunch of little kids now, which is making me lose intrest in even using the site anymore.

Friendster (a portmanteau of “friend” and Napster) launched in March 2002. It was the most popular social network until April 2004, when MySpace (which premiered January 2004) surpassed it. In July 2005, Newscorp purchased MySpace for $580 million, and by 2006, MySpace not only was the most popular social network in the US, it was the most visited website in the US. Interestingly, Twitter launched in 2006 and tripled in size by 2007 (the year of the first “retweet” and the first #hashtag).


The subscriber usage data is the bread and butter of social networks like Facebook. Vero is an option in this case as it’s based on the subscription model; so, it doesn’t show ads and collect data for the same. This fast-growing social media alternative is only app-based. They do collect your usage stats but make it available to you only to monitor how often you use the service. However, this option is turned off by default.


For those determined to exit the Facebook ecosystem, the best approach is more likely to be a patchwork of sites and apps that mirror individual features. Messaging is the easiest: apps such as Telegram and Signal offer messaging and group chats, as well as voice calls, with encryption to keep your communications private. Telegram even has a thriving collection of chatbots, similar to Facebook Messenger.
App.Net was, I think, the closest we’ve come to a good Twitter alternative, and it came out back in 2012. It did basically everything Twitter did, but nicer. It had a decent web experience and a great selection of third party apps up and running within weeks of launch. And while it was a paid service (and maybe therefore doomed from the start), tons of people in the tech community went there and were having lively discussions. My App.Net feed was a joy to browse, and most of my Twitter friends were there. Oh yeah, and it was an app platform that let some devs build off their back end in interesting ways.
Vero is a subscription based social network. It shows no ads and doesn’t collect data. It’s a totally different model to Facebook in the sense that Facebook needs user data in order to make money from them. Vero does collect some usage data which is used to see how often the app is used, but note that this option by default is off. Unlike Facebook where they have everything turned on and you have to go into your settings and turn them off.
Each person also has a profile page, similar to Facebook’s, where you can add a cover photo, a profile photo, and status updates. You can also add fun little anecdotes on a sidebar, including what you’re eating, drinking, reading, watching, or quoting. In that sense, it’s a little reminiscent of the features some people enjoyed on MySpace. In the other sidebar, you can share bio details like your job, college, interests, and relationship status.
Minds does a little bit of everything, and its open-source, privacy-oriented, community-owned platform has actually attracted quite a few users. It has most of the standard Facebook features – profiles, timelines, media sharing, messaging, etc. But it also has hints of Reddit and Medium.com, with its content curation features and emphasis on original blogging content (which can be monetized using the site’s cryptocurrency tools).
Last year, Mastodon made splashes as an open source Twitter competitor but you can also use it as a Facebook alternative. Apart from all the differences in terms of privacy, character length, what really sets Mastodon apart is the “instance” feature. You can think of the service as a series of connected nodes (instances) and your account belongs to a particular instance.

Twitter, the platform I once loved, has turned into a terrible place. It's become a way to pervert the political discourse, to enable trolls, and to fuel the spread of conspiracy theories. And that's just lately. Seeing people I generally like and agree with subtweeting and attacking others—on top of the world's perpetually bleak news—has begun to gnaw away at my mental health and spiritual wellbeing. It simply isn't what I signed up for.
It’s incredibly hard, and involves a good deal of luck, but if something is going to be a real Twitter successor/alternative, it needs to first and foremost find a way to get a critical mass of people using it. That can be a critical mass of a Twitter sub-culture, but it needs to be some group that moves in mass. App.Net get “Tech Twitter” to move, but it failed to get more than that (or to make them actually leave Twitter), but I don’t see that happening with Micro.Blog or Mastodon yet. I don’t know how you do that, but I think that’s how you get the momentum.
It is good to read these comments. I am also looking for somewhere else to go. I do not like what fb is doing either. I have been reading some on these othe websites and as for me, i think i will try Mastodon. I like the things i have read about it. Good luck to everyone that is deciding to go somewhere else. Because it isn’t right that fb is trying to control everybody.
First let’s talk about Vero. Anyone that is leaving FB due to privacy concerns and data management concerns would be foolish to trust Vero. Ayman Hariri the founder of Vero is the son of a currupt politician from the Islamic country of Jordan, Ayman himself is personally is a currupt billionaire businessman with serious humanitarian concerns in his recent history, just check on the abandonment of his foreign workers in his former construction company. Not exactly people I would trust with my personal information, but do with it as you will.
The fragmentation that easily happens in decentralized networks can be a blessing, especially for groups that form around beliefs or identities where it can be hard to meet people safely. For instance, those belonging to marginalized groups, or folks with more fringe or misunderstood interests tend to appreciate the in-group feeling they get from a federated social network.

Many might not consider WhatsApp a full-fledged social media platform, but things have changed. Facebook-owned WhatsApp has made its mark in the industry with new features flooding in the App, every other month. It has recently launched video status update with customization options. It has borrowed a feature from Telegram and introduced one way broadcasting on the group chat. WhatsApp also introduced a web client to use the service through a desktop browser, which we found satisfyingly good.


As a Berlin startup, EyeEm has to follow German data protection laws, which are stricter than those in the USA. And the user-friendly presentation of data protection information on the network has also received great praise: Users have access to the full terms and conditions of the data uploaded to the site and how it will/won’t be used, but they also receive a simple, comprehensible summary of this.


On Minds, you can subscribe to people whose posts you want to see. I’m on there as StephDwilson. If you try it out, give me a follow. You can register for Minds through my affiliate link if you want, which is here or go without an affiliate link here. Once you sign up, you can create your own affiliate link for referrals. It’s an interesting concept.
Records, and earned 82,000 equivalent album units in the week ending March 28, according to Nielsen Music. Of that sum, 24,000 were in album sales. Bad Habits is the second full-length studio album for the 29-year-old NAV. The Toronto-born rapper, who signed to fellow Toronto native The Weeknd’s XO imprint in 2017, earlier logged three entries on the Billboard 200 chart. NAV (real name: Navraj Singh Goraya) previously visited the top 10 with his debut studio set, Reckless, which debuted and peaked at No. 8 on the June 2, 2018-dated chart. He also logged entries with the collaborative mixtape Perfect Timing with Metro Boomin (No. 13 on Aug. 12, 2017) and his self-titled mixtape (No. 24 on March 18, 2017). Bad Habits was powered by streaming activity, as it collected 57,000 SEA units in its opening frame. That sum equates to 79.08 million on-demand audio streams for the album’s songs in its first week, making the set the most-streamed album
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