I found it confusing to use (maybe you need to be more techy?) and was put off by the fact that I needed to log in via Twitter. Perhaps this is just so you can connect with the same people. It’s always worthwhile to look at your options. Mastodon was started by Eugen Rochko, who was fed up with the changes that Twitter was making that closely resembled the Facebook algorithms.
Twitter is the one app and website on this list that not only duplicates many of Instagrams photo-filtering capabilities, but also has a huge social network behind it. The people on Instagram are, after all, an enormous part of its appeal. Since late 2012, Twitter's iPhone app has a photo editing feature that mimicks Instagram's core photo-editing capabilities. Twitter is one of the best alternatives to Instagram, with its enormous and active community.
I found it confusing to use (maybe you need to be more techy?) and was put off by the fact that I needed to log in via Twitter. Perhaps this is just so you can connect with the same people. It’s always worthwhile to look at your options. Mastodon was started by Eugen Rochko, who was fed up with the changes that Twitter was making that closely resembled the Facebook algorithms.
TweetDeck, now owned by Twitter, is a desktop powerhouse that tries to bring the same multi-column, quick filtering functionality to the iPhone. Favored by social media marketing, analyst, and engagement types because of the ability to sort, organize, manage, and push out tons of Twitter material, the approach translates down to the much smaller screen with okay but not great results.

Instagram, owned by Facebook has grown over the past few years by leaps and bounds. It’s an all round social network, as it lets you upload photos, short videos and even exchange texts with others. The great thing is you can set Instagram to post your updates on your Facebook, Twitter and other profiles as well. Thanks to Instagram’s popularity, there has been a rise in various similar apps, which you can check out.

500px is a money making machine and reward certain types of photography. (It’s also full of bots). Flickr was great, but it’s now a dinosaur. Tumblr is owned by Verizon and crippled with bots and porn. EyeEm is great as a platform to sell your images. Unsplash has a tremendous visibility but your work is then available for free even for commercial use. Behance is great to showcase projects, but not really made for sharing single images.
It also has a desktop version, allowing you to sync messages between your computer and phone, just like on Messenger. Signal can import your contacts, so it's easy to start a thread with anyone you already have saved in your phone. Signal also has several additional security features that might come in handy if you're aiming to avoid surveillance, like the ability to set messages to delete after a certain amount of time. You can also use Signal to make voice and video calls, just like on Messenger. There are absolutely no advertisements, and the app does not collect your personal information.
The world’s most popular online chatting app has also introduced services for businesses to automate their accounts on WhatsApp to interact one-on-one with their customers. The one privacy issue with WhatsApp is its method to sign up which involves the phone number and its default setting to make the phone number public is a bit of a concern too. There is also a limitation of having just one account per mobile number which might be an issue with businesses which would like a unified experience on the App. But apart from this, the platform is well-optimized for direct messaging and group chatting.

Simple for Facebook actually comes in two options, “Simple Free” and “Simple Pro”, both of which are linked down below. The free variant of the app comes with ads, while the paid does not, not to mention that you’re getting a number of additional options in the Pro version which costs $4. There are a number of themes available in this app, while you can also pin pages, groups, and more if you want.
Traditional e-mail is still a big part of online communication for private and for business use, with many users typically opting for Outlook as their e-mail client. For PC users, Microsoft is practically an essential, but many private users and small businesses often look for alternatives. Luckily, there is a great number of free e-mail programs available for anyone put off by Outlook’s licensing...

Some who saw 2017’s mini Twitter exodus happening dismissed it as a passing fad, while others dissed Mastodon as a dead-end social network doomed to extinction just like its eponymous megafauna. But the thing is, as long as administrators are paying to maintain their instances, Mastodon can expand or contract naturally without threatening the entire network. Because it's open-source, you could even start your own if you were so inclined. There's a main instance—mastodon.social, that seems to be the default for newbs like myself, so my new handle is @bnys@mastodon.social.
If Gab doesn’t taste like your cup of coffee with its conservative undertoned discussion on alt-right topics, Mastodon could be your next social networking home. It is an open source Twitter alternative where you have complete control over your news feed and conversations. Since it is an open source platform, it gives you the freedom to set up your own little social media platform based on your set of interests.
Ello launched back in 2014 with quite a stir in the US as it was about the time when Facebook changed its policy on names of its members, where they had to use their proper legal name. Its popularity grew as Ello presented itself to the world as a “Facebook killer social network” which doesn’t push ads down its users’ throats and doesn’t sell peoples’ information and data to 3rd parties.
Osfoora is a lot like the official Twitter for iPhone app was before the recent changes in version 4.0. That is to say, anyone who liked the original Tweetie will be immediately familiar with most of Osfoora. But Osfoora doesn't just stick to conventions, it jams a lot more features in as well. There's everything from a "home screen" with big icons for major functions to unread badges on the major sections.

Musical.ly isn’t for adults, at least that’s what the main media would tell you. The platform targets 13-18 years old, although there has been a consistent debate if an app like Musical.ly is appropriate for that age group or not. However, Musical.ly, despite its target age group, provides a very functional social media platform. It has its own powerful artistic expression, which is both unique and sticky viral in nature.

Unlike Twitter, Instagram doesn’t have a word limit on its posts, although the users insist that there is a cap after 2,200 characters, which is relatively long anyway. Instagram allows three types of posts: picture, video, and GIF. It also features hashtags and allows up to 30 hashtags on a single post. There is a Direct Message facility to send texts, photos, videos, GIFs and stickers to anyone on the platform, even Beyonce. Addition to that, it has Stories, which is a status update with photos and videos with 24 hours of life, after which they are automatically deleted.
In the last quarter of 2017, Twitter had only 330 million users, much less than Facebook that had 2,07 billion users or Instagram that had approximately 700 million users over that same period. Despite being easy to use and a powerful tool for reaching like-minded people or potential customers for your company's products Twitter is slowly losing the reputation it once had.
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Minds enables growth of connections to occur quickly if you are highly involved on the site and produce good content, when taking into consideration the quantity of users on the site. Boosting of content and profile/channel views can be achieved (via a points system) and not merely bought. Minds also clearly rewards users with points for using the social media site itself, whether in accessing the site each hour or in uploading rich media content such as graphics or videos, unlike Facebook. Guest • Mar 2017 • 3 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
All of this stuff was total catnip for me. After all, what Twitter does isn't that impressive. If anything, Twitter's made its elegant platform significantly worse over the last few years, changing the "favorite" icon, introducing a higher character count, pushing obnoxious "suggestions," and messing up the chronological timeline in favor of an algorithmically-generated one. And then there’s the user-hostile API changes that might spell doom for third-party Twitter clients. It's no wonder that even loyal users are fed up.
@Lee Fuhr: Totally agree, For us I say leave this and use a tool built for the job - i.e. slack, I don't wish to have yet one more "chat" app on my phone and other devices, slack does the job well, supports multiple accounts and a bunch of cool stuff including clickup integration - why re-invent a nice round wheel which already comes with neat white walls? :)
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