This is one of the oldest Facebook alternatives out there and also one of the most unique in terms of its setup. Rather than being owned by a single company, the open-source Diaspora software can be run by anyone who wants to set up a server. Users can choose which “pod” they want their account information to be stored on and set up an account there. Once their data is on that server, they can interact with any other user on the network, regardless of host location.

Buffer is actually one of the most popular apps from this list. This is basically a social media management application, as it allows you to schedule posts and track the performance of your content on various social media channels, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and Google+. This app offers a simple design, and it’s a great solution if you need to schedule posts on any of the aforementioned social media channels, Facebook included, but it can also serve you as an app to check your Facebook feed, of course.


There are no ads, and the service promises "no data mining. Ever." That means it won't try to sell you stuff based on your interests and habits, as revealed through your posts. Of course, Facebook started out without ads and "data mining," and it's now one of the top internet advertising companies. Facebook bought Instagram in 2012 and started showing ads there the following year.
“All my work up to November of 2016 had been social media jobs, like promo posts, ads on my Instagram. Then out of nowhere, I get this huge job that had nothing to do with Instagram and I was valued off my work, versus my number [of followers]. And I was like holy crap, it really put into perspective how small of a bubble Instagram actually is.” — Andrew Kearns (490k followers)

Unlike Twitter, Instagram doesn’t have a word limit on its posts, although the users insist that there is a cap after 2,200 characters, which is relatively long anyway. Instagram allows three types of posts: picture, video, and GIF. It also features hashtags and allows up to 30 hashtags on a single post. There is a Direct Message facility to send texts, photos, videos, GIFs and stickers to anyone on the platform, even Beyonce. Addition to that, it has Stories, which is a status update with photos and videos with 24 hours of life, after which they are automatically deleted.
Mini for Facebook is yet another solid option, it allows you to theme to your preference, while a pitch black theme for OLED displays is also available in settings. There are over 40 added features compared to the official Facebook application, and real-time push notifications are enabled in this application. If you want to download videos from Facebook, that’s not a problem either, as this app allows it. Mini for Facebook is free, but it comes with ads.
Tweetlist offers an excellent way to view lists and quickly switch between them. The Tweetlists tab is quick to access and you simply swipe left and right to view different lists. This client is very snappy and has excellent Voice Over accessibility support. Tweetlists also offers support for Twitlonger, Instapaper, and Read it Later. Another fantastic feature of Tweetlist is that conversations open automatically - if a tweet is part of a conversation, the entire conversation will be displayed upon tapping on the tweet.
LinkedIn has been a popular platform for professionals and it continues to remain so. LinkedIn gives you the ability to interact with other professionals, recruit employees and find jobs. It’s also great if you want to be up to date on the latest business and industry news. There’s also LinkedIn Pulse if you want to share new ideas with other big names of the industry.
Available as a mobile app (you can run Android apps on a PC How to Emulate Android and Run Android Apps on Your PC How to Emulate Android and Run Android Apps on Your PC It's actually pretty easy to get Android apps running on your desktop or laptop! Here, we step you through the best methods. Read More ), Amino can be installed on Google Play and the Apple App Store. Its focus is similar to Mastodon: you’re given communities to join based on your interests.

I'm in the same boat. I'm as conservative as they come, but I was alarmed at all the racism and anti-Semitism over there. I started muting users over there (you can't completely block them) but now I'm realizing it may be just too hard. It's a shame since I would like to see a good Twitter alternative emerge in the future. Right now, Twitter is just too ingrained into our culture to be removed quite so easily.
For my money, at least, I'd much rather you focus on solving the other ten zillion things than go up against Slack. You'll have a hard time displacing Slack for us, and I'm confident nearly everyone we work with would say the same. Even if we liked CU's chat, we'd still have Slack open for the other 15 teams I chat with, so we'd end up going right back to it, methinks…
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