App.Net was, I think, the closest we’ve come to a good Twitter alternative, and it came out back in 2012. It did basically everything Twitter did, but nicer. It had a decent web experience and a great selection of third party apps up and running within weeks of launch. And while it was a paid service (and maybe therefore doomed from the start), tons of people in the tech community went there and were having lively discussions. My App.Net feed was a joy to browse, and most of my Twitter friends were there. Oh yeah, and it was an app platform that let some devs build off their back end in interesting ways.
500px is a money making machine and reward certain types of photography. (It’s also full of bots). Flickr was great, but it’s now a dinosaur. Tumblr is owned by Verizon and crippled with bots and porn. EyeEm is great as a platform to sell your images. Unsplash has a tremendous visibility but your work is then available for free even for commercial use. Behance is great to showcase projects, but not really made for sharing single images.
More and more people are wanting to leave Facebook, especially after Facebook recently deleted (or “unpublished”) more than 800 pages. On Thursday, Facebook acknowledged that it purged more than 800 Facebook accounts. They said the pages were focused on politically oriented content that violated Facebook’s spam policies. Facebook said in a blog post that it was deleting 559 pages and 251 accounts “that have consistently broken our rules against spam and coordinated inauthentic behavior.” But the problem is that many owners of those pages don’t understand why they were deleted. Some pages focused on police brutality were removed. Other deleted pages, like Anti-Media, were alternative or independent news sources. And some were pages belonging to individuals who reported on the news, like Press for Truth. It’s unclear if any of these pages will be able to get their accounts back, but many account owners have publicly said they’re not sure why they were deleted. Some lost their Twitter accounts nearly simultaneously.
Sprout Social is a social media management tool created to help businesses find new customers & grow their social media presence. Small businesses can manage their entire social media presence from a single, intuitive platform. Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Foursquare and more are managed via powerful tools to you listen, engage and grow their audien… Read more about Sprout Social

This idea is antithetical to current consumer marketing ethos, which strives to reach targeted audiences at scale. If you want targeting at scale, you go to Facebook or Google. Either can give you practically everyone in America who fits your target. To be fair, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest can all serve up pretty big targeted audiences.
For more general news that can delight and surprise, try Digg, an aggregation site that prioritizes deeply reported features on a range of topics as well as lots of fun and quirky news stories. And of course, iPhone and iPad owners can always just fire up Apple News if they don't want to bother setting up a whole new system. None of those fit the bill? Here's a deeper look at Facebook News Feed alternatives.
Sprout Social is a social media management tool created to help businesses find new customers & grow their social media presence. Small businesses can manage their entire social media presence from a single, intuitive platform. Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Foursquare and more are managed via powerful tools to you listen, engage and grow their audien… Read more about Sprout Social
It used to be Instagram’s biggest rival but many feel that Hipstamatic lost the war. That doesn’t mean you can’t get better images from Hipstamatic than Instagram though. The beauty of Hipstamatic is that you can completely customize your camera to take unique pictures. With Hipstamatic you can change your virtual lens, film, or flash to find your own unique take on photography. Share your photos with other friends right in the app, or export them to your preferred social network.
You don't get any of this on Mastodon. The flagship instance (which, at the moment, has again closed itself off to new users) is moderated with stricter rules than Twitter, banning users for stuff like Holocaust denial and posting Nazi imagery. If you have friends on another instance, or want to exist a little out of the mainstream, there's a handy finder that can help you locate your new microblogging home. Niches built around Star Trek and anime already exist, so no matter if the main site is still open to new users, you can still exist in the "fediverse."
This is one of the oldest Facebook alternatives out there and also one of the most unique in terms of its setup. Rather than being owned by a single company, the open-source Diaspora software can be run by anyone who wants to set up a server. Users can choose which “pod” they want their account information to be stored on and set up an account there. Once their data is on that server, they can interact with any other user on the network, regardless of host location.

Instagram was launched back in 2010 to accommodate the photo sharing maniacs on the internet. It has set the trend to share beautiful personal and professional photos on the internet and build a following around it. What launched as a simple application to attach relatively low-resolution images has today become the platform of choice for capitalizing, branding and advertising by optimizing photo posts.
And if all else fails, there is always the option to revisit old social haunts. Myspace still exists, albeit as a mish-mash of pop-culture news and dormant profiles of friends who have not logged in since its relaunch in 2012. However, the fact that the opportunity to mine user data for advertisers was one of the reasons cited by media giant Time Inc when it bought Myspace in 2016, perhaps it is best not to rush to revive your Top Friends list just yet.
If you ever share photos on Twitter, then you probably should be on Instagram. Sure, it might be owned by Facebook, and mobile-only, but with hashtag support and the ability to follow some of the biggest names in the world of entertainment The 10 Most Followed People on Instagram: Should You Follow Them Too? The 10 Most Followed People on Instagram: Should You Follow Them Too? This is not our top 10 of Instagram. It's actually the top 10 accounts based entirely on the number of followers each one of them has. Do they merit the hype? Should you follow them... Read More  to some of the best comic book artists 10 Comic Book Artists to Follow on Instagram 10 Comic Book Artists to Follow on Instagram Many comic book artists find Instagram's clean layout and ease of use is conducive to their craft. Here's a brief selection of comic artists you need to follow. Read More , it makes sense.
A simple chat (slack style) it's enough. Just having the possibility to send messages either single user or team (#channel). But please don't forgive to give an useful appeal to mobile app (worst error of competitors is, have a good app but totally no mobile friendly!) i would expect to have a similar whatsapp or slack app for messaging within the slack mobile app!
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