TweetDeck, now owned by Twitter, is a desktop powerhouse that tries to bring the same multi-column, quick filtering functionality to the iPhone. Favored by social media marketing, analyst, and engagement types because of the ability to sort, organize, manage, and push out tons of Twitter material, the approach translates down to the much smaller screen with okay but not great results.

Instagram has nothing on Pixlr-o-matic when it comes to the number of effects, overlays, filters, and frames the app has to offer. Snap a photo within the app or choose from one already in your gallery. Pixlr-o-matic has more than two million possible outcomes, when you do permutations for all the filters, lighting effects, and borders options. And of course, you can share your photos to other sites and services, such as Facebook, imm.io, Dropbox, and Flickr.
Flickr also has a higher grouping called collections where albums can be grouped. I had two projects going in 2012, the Full Moon project and the Equinox/Solstice project. I grouped my monthly full moons into individual albums and for the Equinox/Solstice, spring, summer. fall, and winter had an album. The monthly full moon albums were grouped into the Full Moon collection, and the spring, summer, fall, and winter albums were grouped in the Equinox/Solstice collection.

Facebook hasn't been very fun for the last few years. From political fighting to fake news to privacy concerns, many users are logging on less and others are deleting their accounts altogether. For those who primarily use Facebook today but are looking for alternatives, we've put together a list of the best options—from the most popular challengers to a few of the latest upstarts.
Puffin for Facebook is by the same developers that made Puffin Browser. This is a browser app specifically made for Facebook. It features data compression that allows you to surf Facebook while using less data and also includes a tweaked UI for more enjoyable browsing. It works better on lower-end devices on slower network connections. Those with faster connections and newer phones may have a better experience with a different app. It's completely free with no in-app purchases.
According to sources at the company, the app currently has around 22 million users (Figures accurate as of April 2017). The platform is growing, collecting big investments and extending its functions and features on a regular basis. Its basic idea is the same as Instagram’s: EyeEm is a platform made for sharing photos. Snapshots and professional images can be uploaded and then shared with the community on EyeEm and other linked networks – with a range of different filters and editing tools to add that extra star quality.
Minds looks very similar to Facebook in some ways. Each user has a profile page with a header and a profile photo. You can add stories, images, or status updates just like on Facebook, and users can leave comments, share your posts, or vote them up or down. There’s also a newsfeed, where you can see what other people you’re following have posted. You can also create your own blog or group. However, Minds is different in other ways. As one Minds user, OWNtheNWO, pointed out to me on Minds, “liking” a comment or post doesn’t weigh it in importance like it does on Facebook — they still remain strictly in chronological order. Minds also has a blog system similar to Blogspot, in which you can paywall your content. And you can exchange your Minds tokens on the Etherium blockchain for ETH, and then exchange those into whatever you wish, but the tokens aren’t worth a lot yet.
Friendly for Facebook is quite a popular third-party Facebook app that has been around for a while. This app can replace both Facebook and Messenger, while it supports themes. The app supports both password and fingerprint scanning security options, while it allows you to download both images and videos. This app even comes with a keyword filtering feature, just in case you’re tired of seeing specific posts pop up on your feed.
From the planning side, collecting peoples' contact info can be a pain, sure. But that's a one-time bother. From there, use Paperless Post for beautiful and functional email invites and RSVP tracking. And for more rote calendar-coordination, use Doodle to find the best day for a dinner or meeting that works for everyone. The site lets each guest respond with a time that works for them, so you can easily figure out how best to accommodate everyone's schedule.
If you are a professional photographer or even a budding one, 500px is the place you should visit more often instead of Facebook. 500 px is a very strong photography community and along with interaction with other photographers, you will get to see some amazing pictures. The website also brings various tools and features for photographers. you can also check out other alternatives if you have some disliking to 500px.
If you’re not interested in manually editing your images, you can quickly improve your shots with the preset filters designed specifically for portraits, landscapes, nightlife, food and sunsets. You can also mix and match to get a custom-made look for your photographs. As well as being able to share to all the usual social media platforms, you can also link back to Instagram.
Twitter’s key advantage for me is that it just feels like the place everyone is talking. Basically everyone you want to hear from, whether they be celebrities, athletes, politicians, actors, writers, or regular old people, they’re almost certainly on Twitter. Not only are they there, but they’re active and use it as a one-stop-shop for talking about everything they’re doing. If you’re not on Twitter, you’re cutting out a main place things are announced and talked about.
These decentralized networks run on open-source software, which means anyone can contribute to the software to make it better, or download the code and modify it for their own instance. The software being open source doesn’t guarantee that the code itself is any more or less secure than the proprietary software that runs private social networks, but one of the main benefits of an open source platform is that anyone who has the technical knowledge can look “under the hood” and see exactly how Mastodon or Diaspora works.

GAB is a NO CENSOR zone by them, but if you want to control your feed you can censor yourself. You can share from GAB your videos or go live anywhere and anytime. There are many groups or start one for yourself. Post premium content and build subscribers if you want. Follow many sites and people and comment or up/down vote content. And you can control your feed. If something shows up that you do not want mark as spam or mute. Works great. Guest • Sep 2018 Disagree   Agree


I found it confusing to use (maybe you need to be more techy?) and was put off by the fact that I needed to log in via Twitter. Perhaps this is just so you can connect with the same people. It’s always worthwhile to look at your options. Mastodon was started by Eugen Rochko, who was fed up with the changes that Twitter was making that closely resembled the Facebook algorithms.

Minds is a good alternative to Twitter because it doesn't have the baggage that comes with Twitter's many moderation issues. Minds has a much better transparant policy in which the things you post are actually visible to other people. Minds is hands down the best one-on-one alternative to Twitter's functions without the amateurish censoring of dissenting opinion. stefandekkers • Mar 2017 • 10 agrees and 2 disagrees Disagree   Agree


If you are a professional photographer or even a budding one, 500px is the place you should visit more often instead of Facebook. 500 px is a very strong photography community and along with interaction with other photographers, you will get to see some amazing pictures. The website also brings various tools and features for photographers. you can also check out other alternatives if you have some disliking to 500px.
Twitter that started as the fastest growing microblogging platform almost about a decade ago seems to be dying with its lack of innovation and senseless censorship. Looking at the current stats, Twitter’s active users have been reduced to 330 million worldwide. The platform is struggling to keep its users interested. Over the past few years, it has introduced GIF and Video support, and other exciting features which were too late to introduce to Social Media. Twitter in current form seems to have no life, except for some tweets from Beyonce and Trump. It started from being an ordinary man’s social platform to a network where people sign up to read what their favorite celebrities are tweeting, and it is failing in that too, as all the celebrities are moving to better-structured platforms like Instagram. This has pushed the bluebird away from our lives and left us with no choice but to look for Twitter alternatives.
SteamZoo has long been touted as a great—if not better-alternative to Instagram, partially because of the way it turns editing and sharing your photos into more of a social game that's addictive to play. You can earn badges—much like FourSquare—for sharing photos, adding effects and borders, or even for taking pictures of specific subjects, like your dog or your dinner. Whether you encourage the behavior or not, StreamZoo is a pretty addictive app to use.
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Before Snapseed there was Camera+. Its photoediting features are a lot better than Instagram’s, and even though it’s not as fully featured as Snapseed, you might like it more because it’s cheaper and bit easier to use. Other than the great filters provided, the best thing about Camera+ is the ability to capture photos by setting the exposure at a different point than the focus (something most camera apps don’t let you do). For only $0.99 Camera+ might be the most cost effective Instagram alternative.
SlimSocial for Facebook is one of the lightest Facebook alternative apps, it weighs less than 400KB, and it’s free to use. This app does not come with ads, at least not its own, you will see Facebook’s feed ads, though. The design is quite simple, reminiscent of the mobile Facebook app, and the app works really well, even though the developer notes that the app is in development, and that some features may not work as intended. This is a final version of the app despite what the developer's note says, so feel free to try it out.
Free speech supporters are going to love using Gab.ai, a social network that has had their mobile app banned from both Google Play and the App Store, for failing to comply with their policies on adult content. Be it as it may, Gab.ai still offers shelter to people who think that hate speech or non-art related public nudity is somehow okay in the public domain. However, you really have to look for unsavory content, and most of the posts on the platform are dedicated to memes, pop culture or art.

Ello first gained popularity in the US about 3 years ago when it posed itself as a Facebook killer social network. This happened due to Facebook’s policy of forcing the members to use their legal name. Since then, it had made headlines on different occasions due to different reasons. Now that Zuckerberg’s service is facing flak, Ello is again gaining some traction. Primarily focused on artists and creative people, Ello is also ad-free. It also refrains itself from selling the information about the users to third parties. By being a niche website, Ello continues to attract users and establishing as a creators network.


Plurk utilizes a horizontal timeline, with messages summarized by single verbs (“feels”, “loves”, etc.). As you would expect, media files can be shared, and Plurks can be liked. Emoticons are an important element of the Plurk user experience, and your selection increases as your karma grows. Karma is based on your activity on the social networking site. Group chat and direct messaging are also featured on Plurk.
We Heart It is another popular image sharing platform similar to Imgur, but its content is very feminine, primarily made of inspirational photos and quotes that appeal to young women. Instagrammers who love inspirational content might really love this app not just for the content but for connecting to very positive and inspirational users in the community too.
No matter which Twitter alternative you use; you would see the growing influence of Musical.ly on other platforms. Muical.ly allows you to use famous audio cues from the platform to record a video performance. After you record the video, you are given plenty of filters and effects to add upon it. It then gives you an ability to share between the other social media platforms. After you publish your performance, it goes out in the public thread. This might raise an arrow or two for its lousy privacy, but Musical.ly have its privacy policy in place, fortunately. You can quickly change the privacy setting and select who can see your posts.

Since its founding in 2012, the operators of Ello have taken on a challenging task: they want to establish Ello as the leading, ad-free alternative to Facebook and other social platforms. This means that they’ll avoid personalized advertising at all costs. With Ello, there’s absolutely no forwarding of user data for advertising purposes and that isn’t likely to change. The platform is financed by a freemium model that involves the exchange of individual functions for small payments. There’s no official data about the number of users currently on the Ello network, but various sources range from 1.5 million to 4 million registered users, although the number of active users is assumed to be relatively low.
I'll come right out and say it: I'm not a big fan of Instagram. And no, it's not because iOS users have had their underpants in a wad over the Android release, but because for me, it really doesn't live up to the hype. (Their new privacy-invading terms of service makes them pretty unappealing, too). Here's why, and more importantly, here are some just-as-good alternatives for Android users (and some for iOS users too!) who want to take and share photos with or without those filters that make a 5-megapixel cell phone camera look like a 70s Polaroid.
There are over 20 different filters and borders to choose from, and you can opt to geo-tag your photos with the location where they were taken. Hipster also has a social network behind the scenes here too, and even if we don't think it's terribly useful, it's full of gorgeous photos and really intimate views of the lives of the people who use the app. Plus, it's essential for any good Instagram alternative. If you opt to join, or connect with people who are also using the app, you can look at a map of where other users near you are located and sharing their photos. Oh, and yes—this app is available for iOS and Android as well.
I’d be remiss to not mention Slack or Discord here as well. Those services are good, but they are too insular to be a real threat to Twitter. You have to know someone on the inside to get in yourself, and there are so many versions/channels/servers for you to join it’s hard to keep them all straight. They can be good for you and a couple dozen (hundred) of friends to stay in touch, but it’s not great for a Twitter-style experience.
Everything has its pros and cons and so does Facebook. While Facebook has become a part of our lives and it is loved by millions, it has got its share of criticisms. It has been panned across the globe for its ever changing privacy settings, which gives Facebook total control over the information that we provide on our accounts. If you are in mood for a surprise, just compare the privacy disclaimers of Facebook from its past to present to know the difference. Facebook’s experiments with the News Feed has also not gone down too well with users. The company’s Internet.org initiative has also made sure to irk net neutrality enthusiasts. To sum it up, these are good enough reasons to need Facebook alternatives.

It’s incredibly hard, and involves a good deal of luck, but if something is going to be a real Twitter successor/alternative, it needs to first and foremost find a way to get a critical mass of people using it. That can be a critical mass of a Twitter sub-culture, but it needs to be some group that moves in mass. App.Net get “Tech Twitter” to move, but it failed to get more than that (or to make them actually leave Twitter), but I don’t see that happening with Micro.Blog or Mastodon yet. I don’t know how you do that, but I think that’s how you get the momentum.

I will be 77 years old in a few weeks and the last 5 years I had built a network of friends and family of course, like everyone else, posted family pictures for posterity… anyway, was locked out due to a technicality and was so very lonely after 3 months I started a new account – my frieds were excited to reconnect and I felt like a kid in a candy store. 5 Days later am locked out again and bereft.
You may not realize this, but MySpace still exists and you can still create an account there. In fact, some people’s old MySpace accounts are still there, too. It’s not really clear if anyone’s trying MySpace again after the Facebook issues — they may be gone for good. But it might be worth checking out for nostalgia’s sake at the very least. In June, The Guardian did a story about people who still enjoy using MySpace. However, one dedicated user did say that most profiles on MySpace are abandoned. Meredith Corporation is selling the media brand Time to Salesforce’s founders, Marc and Lynne Benioff. Meredith also owns Viant, which it’s looking into selling. Since Viant owns MySpace, it’s anyone’s guess what will happen to MySpace next.
Ein paar Dinge sind in den letzten Tagen zusammengekommen, über die man sich bei Twitter ärgern kann: Zunächst hat Twitter angekündigt, die eigene CI gegen freie Entwickler durchzusetzen. Und dann bricht der Dienst nach der Einführung eines neuen Sicherheits‐​Features zusammen. Zeit sich einmal wieder an die freie Alternative zu erinnern: Das auch unter dem Namen „Identi.ca” bekannte StatusNet.
Lately, I’ve written a lot about the alternative media purge and how Big Tech social media platforms are attempting to control the narrative, the elections, and public perception through censorship and financial blacklisting. Lots of people are ready to leave websites like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube for less-censored pastures. But what are the social media alternatives that are currently available?
Realistically, Facebook has the advantage of scale – everyone is on it, and it’s not going to be easy to get enough people to switch over to a new network to make it a viable alternative. Networks that focus on niche communities may have better luck, but for average users, the best option is probably to pick a network that appeals to you, join up, explore, and cross-post with your regular social media. Like it or not, Facebook and Twitter are dominant, and any serious competitor is going to have to integrate with them to at least some degree to make switching a softer move for the users.
While a free speech focused service might not seem unreasonable, it hasn’t worked out well for Gab so far. Its mobile app was banned in 2016 from the Apple App Store due to adult content. In 2017, meanwhile, Google removed the app from the Play Store for violating its hate speech policy, noting that Gab failed to “demonstrate a sufficient level of moderation, including for content that encourages violence and advocates hate against groups of people.”
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