Mini for Facebook is yet another solid option, it allows you to theme to your preference, while a pitch black theme for OLED displays is also available in settings. There are over 40 added features compared to the official Facebook application, and real-time push notifications are enabled in this application. If you want to download videos from Facebook, that’s not a problem either, as this app allows it. Mini for Facebook is free, but it comes with ads.
Vero is a subscription based social network. It shows no ads and doesn’t collect data. It’s a totally different model to Facebook in the sense that Facebook needs user data in order to make money from them. Vero does collect some usage data which is used to see how often the app is used, but note that this option by default is off. Unlike Facebook where they have everything turned on and you have to go into your settings and turn them off.
Path is an app-based platform that doesn’t work with desktop browsers, so if you’re looking for something that works with both, then this won’t be right for you. This app is designed for working with smaller, more interpersonal groups rather than hundreds and hundreds of friends. Users share updates, photos, media they’re using, books, movies, and shopping purchases.
Mini for Facebook is yet another solid option, it allows you to theme to your preference, while a pitch black theme for OLED displays is also available in settings. There are over 40 added features compared to the official Facebook application, and real-time push notifications are enabled in this application. If you want to download videos from Facebook, that’s not a problem either, as this app allows it. Mini for Facebook is free, but it comes with ads.

More and more people are wanting to leave Facebook, especially after Facebook recently deleted (or “unpublished”) more than 800 pages. On Thursday, Facebook acknowledged that it purged more than 800 Facebook accounts. They said the pages were focused on politically oriented content that violated Facebook’s spam policies. Facebook said in a blog post that it was deleting 559 pages and 251 accounts “that have consistently broken our rules against spam and coordinated inauthentic behavior.” But the problem is that many owners of those pages don’t understand why they were deleted. Some pages focused on police brutality were removed. Other deleted pages, like Anti-Media, were alternative or independent news sources. And some were pages belonging to individuals who reported on the news, like Press for Truth. It’s unclear if any of these pages will be able to get their accounts back, but many account owners have publicly said they’re not sure why they were deleted. Some lost their Twitter accounts nearly simultaneously.


All of this stuff was total catnip for me. After all, what Twitter does isn't that impressive. If anything, Twitter's made its elegant platform significantly worse over the last few years, changing the "favorite" icon, introducing a higher character count, pushing obnoxious "suggestions," and messing up the chronological timeline in favor of an algorithmically-generated one. And then there’s the user-hostile API changes that might spell doom for third-party Twitter clients. It's no wonder that even loyal users are fed up.
Fire up the app, and when you tap to take a picture, you're shunted to your phone's default camera app to take your photo. Snap it, and you're returned to Flickr to edit it. Best of all, Flickr gives you ultimate control over the licensing of your photos. You can make them public or private, license them yourself via Getty, make them remix-friendly via Creative Commons, or keep them locked down, all rights reserved to you. And contrary to previous reports, Flickr is still a buzzing social network with thousands of users and thousands more photos.

Fb…just did that to me ..cut me off after a hacker hacked into my account. They’re asking for photo proof, age and my name..the list of documuments they will accept to send as proof is my ss card ..drivers licenses..things i’m not really sure i want them to see..they tell me to cover up some of the information but my address will still be visible. I even asked if this was FB. No response except they can not go future without proof..
Twitter that started as the fastest growing microblogging platform almost about a decade ago seems to be dying with its lack of innovation and senseless censorship. Looking at the current stats, Twitter’s active users have been reduced to 330 million worldwide. The platform is struggling to keep its users interested. Over the past few years, it has introduced GIF and Video support, and other exciting features which were too late to introduce to Social Media. Twitter in current form seems to have no life, except for some tweets from Beyonce and Trump. It started from being an ordinary man’s social platform to a network where people sign up to read what their favorite celebrities are tweeting, and it is failing in that too, as all the celebrities are moving to better-structured platforms like Instagram. This has pushed the bluebird away from our lives and left us with no choice but to look for Twitter alternatives.
More and more people are wanting to leave Facebook, especially after Facebook recently deleted (or “unpublished”) more than 800 pages. On Thursday, Facebook acknowledged that it purged more than 800 Facebook accounts. They said the pages were focused on politically oriented content that violated Facebook’s spam policies. Facebook said in a blog post that it was deleting 559 pages and 251 accounts “that have consistently broken our rules against spam and coordinated inauthentic behavior.” But the problem is that many owners of those pages don’t understand why they were deleted. Some pages focused on police brutality were removed. Other deleted pages, like Anti-Media, were alternative or independent news sources. And some were pages belonging to individuals who reported on the news, like Press for Truth. It’s unclear if any of these pages will be able to get their accounts back, but many account owners have publicly said they’re not sure why they were deleted. Some lost their Twitter accounts nearly simultaneously.
If you're looking for a photo editing app that lets you do more than dress up your images, something that really lets you fine-tune them, Snapseed is the ticket. Snapseed is PCMag's Editors' Choice for iPhone camera apps. We love its non-destructive editing capabilities, powerful photo correction, localized adjustments, and variety of image-enhancing effects.
Last year, after Twitter began moving away from a purely chronological feed, Rochko began building the back end for what would become Mastodon. Instead of building a unified service, Rochko envisioned something more like email, or RSS: a distributed system that lets you send public messages to anyone who follows you on the service. Anyone can create a server and host their own instance of Mastodon, and Mastodon works in the background to connect them. (source)
In the last quarter of 2017, Twitter had only 330 million users, much less than Facebook that had 2,07 billion users or Instagram that had approximately 700 million users over that same period. Despite being easy to use and a powerful tool for reaching like-minded people or potential customers for your company's products Twitter is slowly losing the reputation it once had.
Of course, there are so many great things about Twitter. The problem is, those great things are available elsewhere. If you’re looking for positive conversation and exploration of ideas, niche, geeky interests, or a means to share music, video, or photos, the following Twitter alternatives are worth your time. Like Twitter, they all offer mobile apps, so you can stay connected 24/7.
The fragmentation that easily happens in decentralized networks can be a blessing, especially for groups that form around beliefs or identities where it can be hard to meet people safely. For instance, those belonging to marginalized groups, or folks with more fringe or misunderstood interests tend to appreciate the in-group feeling they get from a federated social network.
Flickr has had its ups and downs in the last few years, but the photo hosting service is worth considering as a way to edit and share images when you're on the go. With the Flickr app, you can shoot, upload, and geo-tag your photos. It has an easy-to-use interface and acts as a simple tool for moving photos you shoot on your phone to the cloud. Additionally, the Flickr app lets you apply a few filters and a caption, and also lets you share with Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or email. It doesn't have as many editing bells and whistles as some of the other Instagram alternatives, but if you're looking for a simple photo-sharing app that offers basic photo enhancements, this is the app for you.

Piksel people create and manage OTT video monetization solutions for some of the world’s leading media brands: AT&T U-verse, BSkyB, Celcom, Channel 4, Mediaset, Sky Deutschland, Sky Italia, Televisa Mexico, Vodafone and more. Headquartered in New York City, Piksel offices can be found throughout Europe and the Americas, serving more than 1600 cli… Read more about Piksel


I don’t expect to move over to either of these as my main social network, but Twitter’s latest waves of jack-assery has kickstarted the conversation again. There are a few problems with these other services, but the main thing is that they just haven’t managed to get enough people to stick around and use them for long. People tend to try them and bounce off them pretty quickly. I know I have bounced off each of them numerous times.
@Zeb: Hi! Please consider putting this back on the roadmap. Our team members don’t want 2 apps going. When you do an universal search, you want it to search both tasks and chats in one platform, not check two. Also, you want to be able to create tasks on the fly while you’re chatting. Sometimes your previous chat message should actually be converted into a task which should be done in a click. There are so many messages that fly between a team that don’t “fit” into a task. Team chats are really essential to us and we would love to move from Flow but it doesn’t make sense logistically to go from one app to two because we want to simplify not complicate the process. Chat and tasks really should be linked.
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