Emoticons are one of the main ways to interact with your friends and followers on the platform. The number of emoticons on your profile increases with your involvement, which it calls ‘Karma.’ Plurk also has mainstream features like Direct and group messaging. It is a very indistinguishable platform compared to Twitter but, it’s a happy, colorful place.


The platform Diaspora is a social world online that puts your data back in your own hands, according to its own slogan. Its range of functions is similar to those of Facebook. Users can publish status updates, share posts and images, and comment on other people’s posts. And just like on Facebook, you can control who gets to see your own posts as well. Diaspora uses hashtags to order posts, meaning that you can use these to find like-minded people who share your interests. Linking Diaspora to your Facebook profile is also possible, and the software has its own chat function. Diaspora is also an open source project.

Honestly! I was thinking of leaving Twitter but what’s really the alternative? I get the news faster there than anywhere else; I have been able to pretty much choose the information I get on my timeline ( which is all in one place at the same time if I want to see it); I can block out the deplorables (yeah, I said it!)...so what is a REAL alternative? Although I would leave in a heartbeat because of the continued support of Alex Jones and his ilk...and go to what?
Instagram is really best known for engaging the "hipster photo" scene, an appropriate term when you consider the irony involved in retro-looking images being produced digitally. Instagram's cheesy, low-grade filter effects, which some shutterflies simply abhor, let anyone with an iPhone or Android phone turn their photos back 40 years. And who could resist that slightly fuzzy 70s haze appeal (answer: anyone with an appreciation for photography as an artform).
If you're looking for a photo editing app that lets you do more than dress up your images, something that really lets you fine-tune them, Snapseed is the ticket. Snapseed is PCMag's Editors' Choice for iPhone camera apps. We love its non-destructive editing capabilities, powerful photo correction, localized adjustments, and variety of image-enhancing effects.
I don’t expect to move over to either of these as my main social network, but Twitter’s latest waves of jack-assery has kickstarted the conversation again. There are a few problems with these other services, but the main thing is that they just haven’t managed to get enough people to stick around and use them for long. People tend to try them and bounce off them pretty quickly. I know I have bounced off each of them numerous times.
It brings the best of both Instagram and Facebook together into one beautiful app for sharing everything from photos and videos, to music and books. And if you ever find yourself overwhelmed with too many friends on Path, you can take advantage of the convenient "Inner Circle" feature to bring you back to your connections with those you care about most.

Faster for Facebook Lite is one of the newer Facebook apps. It uses the lighter and less resource intensive Facebook Lite as its template instead of the usual Facebook. The app includes Facebook and Facebook Messenger support, it can view all kinds of content like video and GIFs, and you can change to classic Facebook mode if needed. It's a web wrapper like most Facebook apps. However, the dark mode and all-in-one experience are definitely nice. The premium version goes for $2.99 and that's a perfectly reasonable price for it. It's better than most.
GAB is a NO CENSOR zone by them, but if you want to control your feed you can censor yourself. You can share from GAB your videos or go live anywhere and anytime. There are many groups or start one for yourself. Post premium content and build subscribers if you want. Follow many sites and people and comment or up/down vote content. And you can control your feed. If something shows up that you do not want mark as spam or mute. Works great. Guest • Sep 2018 Disagree   Agree
I'll come right out and say it: I'm not a big fan of Instagram. And no, it's not because iOS users have had their underpants in a wad over the Android release, but because for me, it really doesn't live up to the hype. (Their new privacy-invading terms of service makes them pretty unappealing, too). Here's why, and more importantly, here are some just-as-good alternatives for Android users (and some for iOS users too!) who want to take and share photos with or without those filters that make a 5-megapixel cell phone camera look like a 70s Polaroid.
The Zimbra platform provides a space for open collaboration and messaging, as well as online private social networking and community building among staff and clients. Zimbra Collaboration and Zimbra Community form the core of the Zimbra platform. Both products provide a range of communication and collaboration features including blogs, wikis, calend… Read more about Zimbra
Emoticons are one of the main ways to interact with your friends and followers on the platform. The number of emoticons on your profile increases with your involvement, which it calls ‘Karma.’ Plurk also has mainstream features like Direct and group messaging. It is a very indistinguishable platform compared to Twitter but, it’s a happy, colorful place.
Twitterrific by the Iconfactory was the very first Twitter application for the iPhone, even predating Apple's official App Store. It is full-featured, award-winning client with a beautiful and intuitive UI. Twitterrific supports link shortening and tweet translation in addition to the ability to filter your timeline for specific tweet types and trends. It's clean and elegant and color-codes your timeline so you can see tweets, @mentions, and DMs all in the same stream.
The Nextdoor mobile app for Android and iOS is a great way for people to keep up with the Joneses, the Kardashians, or anyone else in your neighborhood. Whether you want to make friends with your neighbors; are looking to easily sell your stuff; want to hire a babysitter, house sitter, or dog walker; or get informed about yard sales, what you need may be as close as a neighbor a few doors away. Nextdoor has also become a popular place for posts that alert users to nearby criminal activity and for sharing critical info during an earthquake or flood, for example.
Facebook is the most popular social media site on planet Earth. It has over a billion registered users, most of which are active on almost a daily basis. Unfortunately, the official Facebook app is a data using, resource hogging, battery draining catastrophe of an app that a lot of people don’t want. It’s always good to have options so we’re going to take a look at the best Facebook apps for Android. If these aren’t doing it for you, we have a second list of Facebook alternatives here that’s a little bit more in-depth! There are new Facebook apps coming down the pipes as well, but we don’t think they’re quite ready for prime time yet. That includes apps like this one.
Swipe for Facebook is a replacement for both Facebook and (Facebook) Messenger, in case you need both in one. The Chat Heads functionality is still available in this app, in case you’re a fan of that, while PiP video functionality is also included, so that you can watch videos while you’re browsing your Facebook feed. This app allows you to sort your news feed by Most Recent, if you want, while the app is available in a ton of language, similar to Fella for Facebook.
You may not realize this, but MySpace still exists and you can still create an account there. In fact, some people’s old MySpace accounts are still there, too. It’s not really clear if anyone’s trying MySpace again after the Facebook issues — they may be gone for good. But it might be worth checking out for nostalgia’s sake at the very least. In June, The Guardian did a story about people who still enjoy using MySpace. However, one dedicated user did say that most profiles on MySpace are abandoned. Meredith Corporation is selling the media brand Time to Salesforce’s founders, Marc and Lynne Benioff. Meredith also owns Viant, which it’s looking into selling. Since Viant owns MySpace, it’s anyone’s guess what will happen to MySpace next.
Faster for Facebook Lite is one of the newer Facebook apps. It uses the lighter and less resource intensive Facebook Lite as its template instead of the usual Facebook. The app includes Facebook and Facebook Messenger support, it can view all kinds of content like video and GIFs, and you can change to classic Facebook mode if needed. It's a web wrapper like most Facebook apps. However, the dark mode and all-in-one experience are definitely nice. The premium version goes for $2.99 and that's a perfectly reasonable price for it. It's better than most.
Gab has a strong commitment to ensuring freedom of expression for it's users. It is continually improving the it's usability and has a growing userbase of individuals. Unlike Twitter you get 300 characters, the ability to downvote posts and no ads. It's like Twitter before Jack become CEO again and started shadowbanning, deverifying and banning certain users for their politics. Guest • Sep 2018 • 2 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree

What about Ello or Diaspora? I have been getting kicked completely out of Facebook and I have had to delete my app several times. And I know that I have let my friends on Facebook know that I was looking for something outside of Facebook. My Aunt as well as a few others are looking too. But I told them as soon as I find something I would let them know. I don’t think I should be discriminated against for being conservative and this to is happening on Facebook as well.
It’s incredibly hard, and involves a good deal of luck, but if something is going to be a real Twitter successor/alternative, it needs to first and foremost find a way to get a critical mass of people using it. That can be a critical mass of a Twitter sub-culture, but it needs to be some group that moves in mass. App.Net get “Tech Twitter” to move, but it failed to get more than that (or to make them actually leave Twitter), but I don’t see that happening with Micro.Blog or Mastodon yet. I don’t know how you do that, but I think that’s how you get the momentum.
It was launched recently in year 2016 but its interactive features have made it popular enough among youngsters. If you have used Muscial.ly app then Live.ly can appear like a potential competitor to that. It allows users to broadcast memorable moments from their life and people can also watch live streams at any corner of world. When you like some live streams then you can simply send “loves” to the broadcaster and update comments. It also allow users to send gift points to each other and these gift points can be bought be spending real money. You will definitely love the Daily Leaderboard feature of Live.ly that assists in easy channel shorting as per number of total “Loves” received b the broadcaster. Anyone can browse for specific categories of streams to enjoy as per mood. Live.ly also gives opportunity to initiate search for friends by using their contact numbers or usernames.

I know that personally, I’m not too jazzed about the learning curve of some of these new options and prefer the more familiar layouts of Real.Video (Brighteon), MeWe, and Gab. But honestly, people on social media can just be so horrible that Selco Begovic and I started an old-fashioned forum that is a throw-back to the 90s/early 2000s. I like forums because they’re familiar, comfortable, and they draw likeminded people together.
Last year, Mastodon made splashes as an open source Twitter competitor but you can also use it as a Facebook alternative. Apart from all the differences in terms of privacy, character length, what really sets Mastodon apart is the “instance” feature. You can think of the service as a series of connected nodes (instances) and your account belongs to a particular instance.

Before there was Instagram, there was Flickr. And for many of us, this was our first online portal to have ones photography critiqued. Similar to Instagram, Flickr is a photo sharing platform but has more effective search tools, especially online. There are similarities in following and being followed but does not have the same mass audience as Instagram. Most of the feedback, positive or otherwise, will likely come from other photographers rather than prospective clients. That being said, top Flickr talent is seldom ignored, and the platform has launched many a career in the world of fine art and conceptual photography.
It doesn't bother with a social network on the back-end (and honestly, why bother if your friends are all on Twitter or Facebook and you're going to send the photo there anyway) which we can't fault them for. The real focus of Pixlr-O-Matic is the filters, the borders, the tweaks, and all of the changes you can make to your photos. In the end, you get over 2 million different permutations and options to make your photos look just right (or all wrong, depending) before you save the finished product to your camera roll or gallery and then share it with your friends.
The aptly named Hipster borrows a lot from Instagram, including the snappy photo shooting and all of the great filters you can apply to your photos. Hipster also allows you to add text captions to your photo "postcards" before sharing them, and then post your photos to Twiter, Facebook, Flickr, or Tumblr for others to see. It's fast, easy to use, and probably the simplest to get started with in the roundup.
We love the clean and simple layout and the back to basics concept. There are no hashtags and it’s not about collecting heart-shaped likes: the focus is purely on sharing beautiful work with people who appreciate photography. The curated collections are a great place to find inspiration for your next shoot, and 500px actively encourage open and honest feedback with the aim of helping users improve their work. These collections are put together by fellow photographers and are broken down into categories such as people and nature, so you can delve into what you love without sifting through the rest.
I will be 77 years old in a few weeks and the last 5 years I had built a network of friends and family of course, like everyone else, posted family pictures for posterity… anyway, was locked out due to a technicality and was so very lonely after 3 months I started a new account – my frieds were excited to reconnect and I felt like a kid in a candy store. 5 Days later am locked out again and bereft.
Whether or not they have a website or a printed portfolio, a photographer’s social media feed is typically the first place potential clients, collectors and others discover their work. Many photographers are doing more than posting single images. Using the tools available on various platforms, they are curating and sharing sequences of images and video clips, and demonstrating their ability...
Karolis Rimkus began building his successful dropshipping store through influencer marketing: “At first I did a lot of influencer outreach. I would offer micro influencers, people with like 8,000 followers, an item they could make a giveaway with, or just send them a few free items in exchange for mentions. It worked, and I was growing and making sales.”
As another safety net, Edmodo also lets parents join the network. Doing so differentiates it from cyberbullying-ridden apps such as After School 5 Reasons Your Kids Shouldn't Use the After School App 5 Reasons Your Kids Shouldn't Use the After School App Plenty of children use the After School app, but there are some solid reasons why parents should steer their kids clear of it. Read More . By joining, parents can engage in the learning process and coordinate their efforts with teachers and professors.
Now to Minds. Minds doesn’t limit their posts or their speech this unfortunately encourages bots to share, like, and reshare everything to earn “minds coins.” There is a huge vietnamese community on minds and that is not a bad thing, but when vietnamese bots are sharing Nazi propaganda for likes it gets confusing very quickly. Yes that’s right I said Nazi! One of the largest demographics on Minds is the Nazi party. Be prepared to be called the worst things possible and read some of the worst hate speech known to man on even a flower photo. Minds considers this free speech so Nazi propaganda goes right up there with porn, transvestite porn, and a lot of swearing. Not to mention nobody ever comments on anything and if the do it’s like two words “nice pic.” Overall I truly can’t get behind minds it is filled with filth and hate and that is too bad because outside of its buggy confusing interface that requires both the mobile app and the web browser site to access all of the functions I kinda wanted to pull for it.
Minds looks very similar to Facebook in some ways. Each user has a profile page with a header and a profile photo. You can add stories, images, or status updates just like on Facebook, and users can leave comments, share your posts, or vote them up or down. There’s also a newsfeed, where you can see what other people you’re following have posted. You can also create your own blog or group. However, Minds is different in other ways. As one Minds user, OWNtheNWO, pointed out to me on Minds, “liking” a comment or post doesn’t weigh it in importance like it does on Facebook — they still remain strictly in chronological order. Minds also has a blog system similar to Blogspot, in which you can paywall your content. And you can exchange your Minds tokens on the Etherium blockchain for ETH, and then exchange those into whatever you wish, but the tokens aren’t worth a lot yet.
Add Friends – Players can request friends by targeting them in game and confirming the request. The friend display name will always be the name of the character that created the friendship. Characters have a context menu option to refuse friend requests. Players can have up to 50 friends at a time. There is a 30 second delay between sending friend requests.
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