Traditional e-mail is still a big part of online communication for private and for business use, with many users typically opting for Outlook as their e-mail client. For PC users, Microsoft is practically an essential, but many private users and small businesses often look for alternatives. Luckily, there is a great number of free e-mail programs available for anyone put off by Outlook’s licensing...
Some Facebook alternatives focus more on local features. Nextdoor is about connecting users with the people in their real-life community – where they live – while Raftr takes the approach of linking people who are interested in the same topics or activities, wherever they are in the world. Boot-sale app Shpock, meanwhile, already arguably does a better job than Facebook’s Marketplace feature at being a more-local eBay.
All social networks are a cancer on the body of the Internet. They may be convenient, they may provide some desired services but they also provide as many undesired problems (if not more). If they are controlled or moderated, then everybody is only allowed to say the same things and have the same opinion. If they are open then they become platforms for abuse, cyberbullying, ostracism, etc. If social networks disappeared overnight, the Internet would become a much more civilized space.
Plurk features a horizontal timeline and it lets you share pictures, videos or URLs for web-based articles. The platform stimulates its users to spend more time engaging with other Plurk members through the concept of Karma, which grants you access to more emoticons. This social network can be accessed from iPhones, Android devices or from PC or Mac computers.
Lately, I’ve written a lot about the alternative media purge and how Big Tech social media platforms are attempting to control the narrative, the elections, and public perception through censorship and financial blacklisting. Lots of people are ready to leave websites like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube for less-censored pastures. But what are the social media alternatives that are currently available?
For my money, at least, I'd much rather you focus on solving the other ten zillion things than go up against Slack. You'll have a hard time displacing Slack for us, and I'm confident nearly everyone we work with would say the same. Even if we liked CU's chat, we'd still have Slack open for the other 15 teams I chat with, so we'd end up going right back to it, methinks…

We love the clean and simple layout and the back to basics concept. There are no hashtags and it’s not about collecting heart-shaped likes: the focus is purely on sharing beautiful work with people who appreciate photography. The curated collections are a great place to find inspiration for your next shoot, and 500px actively encourage open and honest feedback with the aim of helping users improve their work. These collections are put together by fellow photographers and are broken down into categories such as people and nature, so you can delve into what you love without sifting through the rest.
MeWe hasn’t gotten quite the coverage it deserves, especially given that Tim Berners-Lee, one of the primary architects of the World Wide Web, sits on its board of advisors. Its interface is simple and intuitive, it covers all the Facebook basics, and it is dedicated to maintaining user privacy. It has advertising, but it is not targeted. They compensate for lower ad revenue by selling add-on services, like voice messaging and message encryption. It’s quite user-friendly, and you may be able to connect your Facebook and Twitter to it, though if this feature currently exists, it’s somewhat well-hidden.
Offiria is a an enterprise social network built to improve communication and collaboration among team members. Key features of the open source software include file management and sharing, task tracking and work milestone management. Maxamize productivity by providing a social space for your team to collaborate and share ideas, information and k… Read more about Offiria

But regardless of whether you’re using Twitter, Instagram, or Google+: Awareness and consideration about privacy and data protection are also important factors in choosing to use any of the other social media giants. One common complaint targeted specifically at Facebook is that that Facebook Newsfeed algorithms decide exactly what you do and don’t see. Another problem is personalized advertising, which is of course only possible through accessing and interpreting personal user data. As you can see: the list of criticisms for the social network market leader is long. So it’s good news that there are a few other alternatives to Facebook on the market. Some of these Facebook alternatives are more conservative, offer less advertising, others offer improved data protection, and some even offer extended functions and features that aren’t currently available for Facebook customers.


Why not have a standalone chat feature that integrates well with slack? Not sure how do-able that would be but it would be cool if you could send slack messages right from the Clickup chat session and vise versa -- sort of have them synconized. That way non-slack users still have built in chat and slack users can continue to use slack but the relevant message stream would be viewable from within the clickup chat feature. Not sure if it's possible ... maybe I'm dreaming ...
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