Mini for Facebook is yet another solid option, it allows you to theme to your preference, while a pitch black theme for OLED displays is also available in settings. There are over 40 added features compared to the official Facebook application, and real-time push notifications are enabled in this application. If you want to download videos from Facebook, that’s not a problem either, as this app allows it. Mini for Facebook is free, but it comes with ads.
Since its founding in 2012, the operators of Ello have taken on a challenging task: they want to establish Ello as the leading, ad-free alternative to Facebook and other social platforms. This means that they’ll avoid personalized advertising at all costs. With Ello, there’s absolutely no forwarding of user data for advertising purposes and that isn’t likely to change. The platform is financed by a freemium model that involves the exchange of individual functions for small payments. There’s no official data about the number of users currently on the Ello network, but various sources range from 1.5 million to 4 million registered users, although the number of active users is assumed to be relatively low.
Tinfoil is a little bit older, but many people still swear by it. Tinfoil’s claim to fame is being a Facebook app that doesn’t ask for any of your permissions, hence the name. It’s a web-wrapper like many of these. Thus, most of its features are similar to the web version. The update schedule is a tad unpredictable. It's completely free with no ads and no in-app purchases. That makes it hard to complain too much.
Kristijan has been writing for Android Headlines since 2014 and is an editor for the site. He has worked as a writer for several outlets before joining Android Headlines, and has a background in writing about Android and technology in general. He is a smartphone enthusiast that specializes in Android applications, and that platform in general. Contact him at Kristijan. [email protected]
This idea is antithetical to current consumer marketing ethos, which strives to reach targeted audiences at scale. If you want targeting at scale, you go to Facebook or Google. Either can give you practically everyone in America who fits your target. To be fair, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest can all serve up pretty big targeted audiences.
These decentralized networks run on open-source software, which means anyone can contribute to the software to make it better, or download the code and modify it for their own instance. The software being open source doesn’t guarantee that the code itself is any more or less secure than the proprietary software that runs private social networks, but one of the main benefits of an open source platform is that anyone who has the technical knowledge can look “under the hood” and see exactly how Mastodon or Diaspora works.

You don't get any of this on Mastodon. The flagship instance (which, at the moment, has again closed itself off to new users) is moderated with stricter rules than Twitter, banning users for stuff like Holocaust denial and posting Nazi imagery. If you have friends on another instance, or want to exist a little out of the mainstream, there's a handy finder that can help you locate your new microblogging home. Niches built around Star Trek and anime already exist, so no matter if the main site is still open to new users, you can still exist in the "fediverse."
Following local, national, and international news sources is a good place to start of course, but you can also keep an eye on relevant hashtags or create a Twitter list if you want to keep your news gathering separate from your socializing. For a boosted news experience on Twitter, connect your account to TweetDeck, where you’ve got more advanced search and filter tools.

Edmodo is focused on the education sector. Social media connections between students and teachers How Facebook Plans to Disrupt Education How Facebook Plans to Disrupt Education Facebook recently made a deal with Summit Public Schools, and the implications of this partnership might change everything we know about public education. Read More are playing an increasingly important role in the classroom, but the more public and open platform of services like Facebook tempers their suitability. This has left educators looking around for Facebook alternatives.
Twitter took Facebook's most fundamental feature—the status update—and spun it off into its own app. It's since become a platform for celebrities and politicians to post their every thought, photo, and video. Many of these become news stories in and of themselves. Speaking of news, Twitter has become an excellent news feed as most media organizations post breaking news stories there. Just make sure you're following publications you trust and avoid the comments and replies in most cases. On Twitter, you can also broadcast your 280-character thoughts publicly or make your account private so only the followers you accept can see your activity.
Reddit may be trying to become more of a Facebook alternative. A newer version of Reddit includes profile pages, one-to-one chat features, follow functionality, and more. Some people love this, and others think it’s a little too close to Facebook for their comfort. It should be noted that some people are leaving Reddit due to concerns about censorship, as the QAnon subreddit and related subreddits were recently banned. However, Reddit has said these sites were banned due to harassing someone on Twitter, and has also stood firm about not banning The_Donald subreddit, despite many Reddit users calling for just that.
Vero lets you share photos and video just like Instagram, plus it lets you talk about music, movies or books you like or hate. Though Vero has been around since 2015, its popularity surged in recent days, thanks in part to sudden, word-of-mouth interest from the cosplay community — comic book fans who like to dress up as characters. That interest then spread to other online groups.
Friendly for Facebook is one of the newer Facebook apps. It has a pretty decent set of features as well. That includes theming, Facebook Messenger support, the ability to customize your news feed, and more. You can also download videos from Facebook. The News Feed customization allows you to filter out things like keywords. That's a great way to get rid of nonsense you don't want to see. This is definitely among the best third party Facebook apps. The pro version unlocks some of the feature and goes for $1.99.
Fb…just did that to me ..cut me off after a hacker hacked into my account. They’re asking for photo proof, age and my name..the list of documuments they will accept to send as proof is my ss card ..drivers licenses..things i’m not really sure i want them to see..they tell me to cover up some of the information but my address will still be visible. I even asked if this was FB. No response except they can not go future without proof..
For years, Plurk offered the service that is nearly identical to the ones provided by Twitter, and it increased the number of character you can use in a post to 360 just a few years ago. Nearly 70% of all the traffic on the platform comes from Taiwan, so if you are targeting markets in Western Europe or the United States, Plurk may not be the best social network for you.
In March 2018 Vero jumped from 150,000 users to over 3,000,000 in the wake of Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data breach. The mobile-only platform is well-designed and has some great photo management tools, which may have led to the overall alternative/artistic vibe given off by the current user base. Their privacy policy is not as strong as some others, but they do give users plenty of control and eventually plan to charge a subscription fee in order to avoid advertising, though early adopters will get a free lifetime membership. The mobile-only platform and eventual need to pay for the service may turn some off, but Vero certainly shows some potential.
It was launched recently in year 2016 but its interactive features have made it popular enough among youngsters. If you have used Muscial.ly app then Live.ly can appear like a potential competitor to that. It allows users to broadcast memorable moments from their life and people can also watch live streams at any corner of world. When you like some live streams then you can simply send “loves” to the broadcaster and update comments. It also allow users to send gift points to each other and these gift points can be bought be spending real money. You will definitely love the Daily Leaderboard feature of Live.ly that assists in easy channel shorting as per number of total “Loves” received b the broadcaster. Anyone can browse for specific categories of streams to enjoy as per mood. Live.ly also gives opportunity to initiate search for friends by using their contact numbers or usernames.
I’d be remiss to not mention Slack or Discord here as well. Those services are good, but they are too insular to be a real threat to Twitter. You have to know someone on the inside to get in yourself, and there are so many versions/channels/servers for you to join it’s hard to keep them all straight. They can be good for you and a couple dozen (hundred) of friends to stay in touch, but it’s not great for a Twitter-style experience.
Instagram has nothing on Pixlr-o-matic when it comes to the number of effects, overlays, filters, and frames the app has to offer. Snap a photo within the app or choose from one already in your gallery. Pixlr-o-matic has more than two million possible outcomes, when you do permutations for all the filters, lighting effects, and borders options. And of course, you can share your photos to other sites and services, such as Facebook, imm.io, Dropbox, and Flickr.
Osfoora is a lot like the official Twitter for iPhone app was before the recent changes in version 4.0. That is to say, anyone who liked the original Tweetie will be immediately familiar with most of Osfoora. But Osfoora doesn't just stick to conventions, it jams a lot more features in as well. There's everything from a "home screen" with big icons for major functions to unread badges on the major sections.
You see, there are two types of people in this world, those who love Twitter and those who think that Twitter is nothing but a total waste. If you are the second one, then this article is for you. Here, I am going to post a few websites which are considered as the best alternatives of Twitter. So without uttering any more word, here we are discussing those sites.
You don't get any of this on Mastodon. The flagship instance (which, at the moment, has again closed itself off to new users) is moderated with stricter rules than Twitter, banning users for stuff like Holocaust denial and posting Nazi imagery. If you have friends on another instance, or want to exist a little out of the mainstream, there's a handy finder that can help you locate your new microblogging home. Niches built around Star Trek and anime already exist, so no matter if the main site is still open to new users, you can still exist in the "fediverse."

I don’t expect to move over to either of these as my main social network, but Twitter’s latest waves of jack-assery has kickstarted the conversation again. There are a few problems with these other services, but the main thing is that they just haven’t managed to get enough people to stick around and use them for long. People tend to try them and bounce off them pretty quickly. I know I have bounced off each of them numerous times.

500px has long been popular with the photography community with it's clean approach to photo sharing. No hashtags muddle this pond, 500px is all about sharing great work. Curated collections are excellent and regularly updated, whilst the Exif data upload is a nice touch to delve into the technical workings in-camera (Flickr also has this function). There are plenty of similarities with Flickr in terms of it being a platform angled towards promotion of the best creative work rather than popular accounts and sponsored posts.

Instagram's popularity with photographers is incomparable. What is essentially a free portfolio building app disguises itself as a powerful marketing tool to connect with prospective clients, but it suffers at times due to its sheer size and scope. Maybe you're bored of sieving through lame #goals and #inspiration posts, and want to know what mobile friendly alternatives are out there? Well folks, I'm here to tell you.

I know that personally, I’m not too jazzed about the learning curve of some of these new options and prefer the more familiar layouts of Real.Video (Brighteon), MeWe, and Gab. But honestly, people on social media can just be so horrible that Selco Begovic and I started an old-fashioned forum that is a throw-back to the 90s/early 2000s. I like forums because they’re familiar, comfortable, and they draw likeminded people together.
Users can upload images and videos and use them to tell a story using various layout templates. If you want to tell a story with a series of images, you can then add new videos or images before sharing them. These images can then be seen in the ‘storyline’ feed along with any other stories that a particular user follows. Other users can like and comment on posts in the exact same way as on Instagram, and can also share them to other social media platforms: as can you.
We realize you’re likely on this list to get away from this app. However, sometimes it's unavoidable. Whenever Facebook rolls out a new feature, the official app will have it long before the third party Facebook apps. Facebook’s official suite of apps include Facebook Messenger, Facebook Groups, Facebook at Work, and Facebook Mentions (if you’re famous). They aren’t great for battery life, but they’ll always get the new features first. Facebook Messenger is also notoriously hard to use outside of the official app. Consequently, Facebook also makes Facebook Lite. It's a super light, simple, and surprisingly good alternative to its larger, battery swilling sibling.
Instagram was launched back in 2010 to accommodate the photo sharing maniacs on the internet. It has set the trend to share beautiful personal and professional photos on the internet and build a following around it. What launched as a simple application to attach relatively low-resolution images has today become the platform of choice for capitalizing, branding and advertising by optimizing photo posts.
A lot of people who've fled Facebook have made Instagram their new home—and they haven't let the fact that Facebook has owned the service since 2012 stop them. Instagram is best known as place to post photos of meals, sunsets, travel, and pets. Many also post selfies that are so carefully edited that they're unrecognizable. Others post videos or Snapchat-like stories that showcase 24 hours worth of photos and video that disappear at the end of the day. Like Twitter, it's fun to follow celebrities on Instagram—and through their photos see how the other half lives. On Instagram you can post publicly, share Stories with specific friends, or post privately.
Pros & Cons The Pros and Cons of using Twitter for your Online Marketing. Twitter is a social networking microblogging service that allows registered  pros and cons of twitter for businessnegatives of twittertwitter 280 characters pros and conspros and cons instagrampros and cons of twitter advertisingpros and cons of snapchatPeople also search for ...
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