While deleting Facebook might feel like a step in a more private direction, it's ultimately not going to do much to change the online digital economy that profits by collecting your personal information and selling it to data brokers. Facebook collects arguably the most private information, but plenty of other popular social networking apps like Snapchat and Twitter collect your data too. That's their entire business model: When you're not paying for a product, you are the product. Even your internet-service provider is likely collecting your personal information. In fact, through its expansive ad network, Facebook even collects info from people who aren't even on the platform.
One of Facebook's most useful features isn't the main app itself, but its spinoff app Messenger. But while Messenger makes it easy to chat with Facebook friends, it's also confusing and riddled with unnecessary clutter. If you're looking for a clean and easy-to-use messaging app, try Signal. It's a free, end-to-end encrypted messaging service, approved by security researchers, that sticks to the basics. There are no animated stickers or fancy chat bots, but Signal does an excellent job of keeping you securely connected to your friends and family.
Diaspora's key advantage is that it's based on open source software that multiple servers can run. It does not put your private information, your likes, your contacts and your photos in the hands of one corporation who then use it to increase their own private profits by selling your privacy. Diaspora is much smaller though. The UI feels more like Google Plus than Facebook. JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 8 agrees and 2 disagrees Disagree   Agree

The annual fee, however, is intended to help out the developing company, Vero Labs, by being its main source of income. The idea is for the platform to remain free of advertising in the long run and not to share any user information to make a profit. In addition, the company wants to generate revenue through transaction fees that merchants have to pay when selling products through Vero and implementing the 'buy now' button.
Swipe for Facebook is one of the more powerful Facebook apps. It has a laundry list of features, including an ad blocker, Facebook Messenger support, themes, chat heads, Material Design, and support for over 30 languages. It's less resource intensive than the stock Facebook app. However, it is a little larger than something like SlimSocial. The app even includes multiple layouts that mock the stock Facebook app, Google+, and other setups. The free version has most of the basic features. A single $2.99 in-app purchase gets you the complete experience.
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Then there's the killer feature: You can hide sensitive content behind a button before posting, so people don't have to see your long rant, political content, or spoiler for a new episode of a TV show. The system is designed to encourage thoughtful posting—not selfish or gratuitous posts. It's even simple to contribute descriptions of images you're posting for the visually impaired, something Twitter doesn't bother turning on by default.

While there isn't a true Facebook alternative out there, you're not really looking for that anyway. You're ready for something different—a social network platform where everybody knows your name and you won't get trolled for posting. The following social media apps promise features such as less ad targeting, less fake news, and more security, so users can share updates, read the headlines, and communicate with more confidence in their security and privacy.
Although Vero is similar in many respects to competitors such as Facebook and Instagram (profile, structure, timeline, news feed), the platform offers some interesting unique selling points: The messages in the timeline are not pre-filtered by an algorithm, but appear in chronological order. Contacts can also be divided into four categories: 'followers', 'acquaintances', 'friends', and 'close friends'. These groups can then be selected or deselected as the target group when a post is published, so that only the desired audience is informed.
For my money, at least, I'd much rather you focus on solving the other ten zillion things than go up against Slack. You'll have a hard time displacing Slack for us, and I'm confident nearly everyone we work with would say the same. Even if we liked CU's chat, we'd still have Slack open for the other 15 teams I chat with, so we'd end up going right back to it, methinks…
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