Upvote! If ClickUp implements an effective chat function, just like Slack, then I am going to ditch Slack entirely and migrate my team to ClickUp once and for all. Slack is a simple idea (compared to something like Git), but has achieved tremendous success because it fulfills an essential and important need for running any kinds of businesses or organizations. Of course, its sophistication makes it a better tool than alternative solutions like whatsapp. But it is still a pain in the neck to go back and forth between Slack and ClickUp or another management tool. I seriously feel that ClickUp has the potential to compete with Slack. I also feel the philosophy of the ClickUp is compatible with this model of combining communication with project management. You care about UX, and not just what you could make and sell. From a user's perspective, I'd like to have a tool where I could talk to my team members and manage projects/tasks at the same time.

There you have it. Four great—if not better—alternatives to Instagram. I admit, I don't hate the app as much as I implied earlier, but it's difficult to watch great apps and alternatives get swept under the rug simply because of trendiness and flash rather than substance and features. Still, you may not agree with me—perhaps you've used one of these apps and still prefer Instagram, if only to make iOS users angry? Perhaps there's a killer Instagram feature I've overlooked, or a killer alternative worth mentioning? Whatever you think, agree or disagree, share your thoughts in the discussions below.
Twitter has become a cultural icon since being introduced in 2006. Even President Donald Trump of the United States has gained notoriety for his use of Twitter. Users of the platform are able to send "tweets" which can be no longer than 280 characters. This is double the original limit of 140 characters. In some Asian languages, 140 characters remains the standard.

If you're friends with hundreds or thousands of people on Facebook, it understandably might not be worthwhile to put them all in your Gcal. In this case, it might be easiest just to take 20 minutes or so to add your close friends and family member's special days to your calendar. And really, did the annual onslaught of best wishes on Facebook add much to your life in the first place?
There’s no end-to-end encryption on either platform’s private messaging at the moment, and to be fair there isn’t for Twitter or Facebook either (though Facebook is rumored to be looking into it for their Messenger). Both Mastodon and Diaspora are built on the idea that the conversations happening are meant to be public, so the privacy emphasis is on keeping user data in user ownership and out of advertiser’s hands, not keeping conversations out of the public eye.
PicPlz used to be my personal favorite, until pressure from Instagram on Android forced them to shut down. In their place though, a new challenger has risen—one with an old name. Flickr's new Android app brings most—if not all—of the same features that Instagram offers and combines them with Flickr's own photo-centric social network where your photos belong to you and no one else. Flickr's new Android app lets you take photos straight from your camera and apply filters to them if you choose, then share them with friends on Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, or anywhere else you choose.
It's very much like Twitter with a character limit of 500, except there's not *one* website you have to trust, but you can choose the mastodon server ("instance") that you trust and they are linked, so you can follow people from other instances. The instances all have their own rules, so you can pick a place with as few or many rules as you are comfortable with. mrmbl • May 2017 • 12 agrees and 5 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Flickr has strong organization tools for your images, being able to bring together collections into "Albums" rather than having just one feed. Flickr also has a "Groups" section that are open-sourced public albums. This is a nice way to find collections of images of similar topics, themes, gear, or geography, but these "Groups" are too often messy, unfiltered, and unorganized.
If you're looking for a photo editing app that lets you do more than dress up your images, something that really lets you fine-tune them, Snapseed is the ticket. Snapseed is PCMag's Editors' Choice for iPhone camera apps. We love its non-destructive editing capabilities, powerful photo correction, localized adjustments, and variety of image-enhancing effects.
Auf diese Art „twittere” ich nun schon einige Wochen wieder über beide Kanäle. Als heute bei Twitter nach dem Ausfall eine kleine Diskussion begann, ob man nicht mal wieder Identi.ca ausprobieren sollte. Das bekam eine ziemliche Dynamik und ich musste feststellen, dass fast jeder meiner regelmäßigen Twitterkontakte bereits einen Identi.ca-Account hatte – zum Teil schon sehr lange, oft aber auch lange nicht genutzt.
This is one of the oldest Facebook alternatives out there and also one of the most unique in terms of its setup. Rather than being owned by a single company, the open-source Diaspora software can be run by anyone who wants to set up a server. Users can choose which “pod” they want their account information to be stored on and set up an account there. Once their data is on that server, they can interact with any other user on the network, regardless of host location.
You don't get any of this on Mastodon. The flagship instance (which, at the moment, has again closed itself off to new users) is moderated with stricter rules than Twitter, banning users for stuff like Holocaust denial and posting Nazi imagery. If you have friends on another instance, or want to exist a little out of the mainstream, there's a handy finder that can help you locate your new microblogging home. Niches built around Star Trek and anime already exist, so no matter if the main site is still open to new users, you can still exist in the "fediverse."
In 2016 Apple banned gab’s mobile app on its Appstore for promoting explicit adult content. This was followed by Play Store in 2017, which banned the app for violating hate speech guidelines of Google. Google further noted during its ban that the platform failed in demonstrating a minimum required level of moderation and encouraged violence. Despite all this, Gab still shelters people who are easy on hate speech and non-art nudity. That said, you’ll have to search for things that could offend you on Gab dedicatedly, or else, it is chiefly stuffed with pop culture art, memes, and fair discussions on a variety of topics. And even if you find something that’s offensive to you, like a discussion on online anonymity, you can use the scroll button and explore some memes on Trump.
Adobe Photoshop Express used to be among a short list of favorite photo editing apps, but a recent change that got rid of several of its more advanced effects has left some users unhappy. Nevertheless, for basic editing, it's Photoshop "lite," and you can't go wrong with that. The app has more than 20 filters, and a great corrective auto-fix feature for adjusting attributes quickly. Though there is a shooting mode, Adobe Photoshop Express 2.0 is more about touching up and enhancing images after they've been shot rather than adding extra shooting modes the way apps like Hipstamatic and Camera+ do.
In March 2018 Vero jumped from 150,000 users to over 3,000,000 in the wake of Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data breach. The mobile-only platform is well-designed and has some great photo management tools, which may have led to the overall alternative/artistic vibe given off by the current user base. Their privacy policy is not as strong as some others, but they do give users plenty of control and eventually plan to charge a subscription fee in order to avoid advertising, though early adopters will get a free lifetime membership. The mobile-only platform and eventual need to pay for the service may turn some off, but Vero certainly shows some potential.
Minds is a Facebook clone of sorts that is encrypted, open source, and focuses extensively on free speech. Recently, the site rolled out crypto tokens so users can be rewarded for their participation. You’re rewarded with tokens for your participation, and you can exchange tokens to gain more views if you prefer. You can also send tokens to other channels as tips or for subscriptions.  Learn more about how Minds’ tokens work in Heavy’s story here. If tokens aren’t your thing, you can still use Minds solely for its Facebook alternative option.
Everything has its pros and cons and so does Facebook. While Facebook has become a part of our lives and it is loved by millions, it has got its share of criticisms. It has been panned across the globe for its ever changing privacy settings, which gives Facebook total control over the information that we provide on our accounts. If you are in mood for a surprise, just compare the privacy disclaimers of Facebook from its past to present to know the difference. Facebook’s experiments with the News Feed has also not gone down too well with users. The company’s Internet.org initiative has also made sure to irk net neutrality enthusiasts. To sum it up, these are good enough reasons to need Facebook alternatives.
The platform primarily targets the youngsters, the majority of which are between 18-34 years of age. Snapchat features an explore section where users can access viral and premium content on the platform. Snapchat features video status update, which apparently Instagram and Whatsapp copied on their platforms. The videos are limited to 10 seconds which is fairly short, but you can tag more videos to complete the message if you require more time. The videos and photos only stay on the platform for 24 hours, and automatically gets deleted past the time. There is also no way to share someone else’s videos or photos, unlike Twitter which easily allows the option to retweet. Getting a Snapshot and sharing is only the way out.
Periscope is an app available on Android and iOS that lets you livestream videos to social media. The live streaming is not limited to reporters or media but anyone. Basically, anyone can live stream anything through the app and it is integrated with Twitter nicely. Its social features like interactions and the great comments section make it a great live streaming app. The app was recently acquired by Twitter, so you can expect it to grow immensely in the future.

For years, Plurk offered the service that is nearly identical to the ones provided by Twitter, and it increased the number of character you can use in a post to 360 just a few years ago. Nearly 70% of all the traffic on the platform comes from Taiwan, so if you are targeting markets in Western Europe or the United States, Plurk may not be the best social network for you.

If you're looking for a photo editing app that lets you do more than dress up your images, something that really lets you fine-tune them, Snapseed is the ticket. Snapseed is PCMag's Editors' Choice for iPhone camera apps. We love its non-destructive editing capabilities, powerful photo correction, localized adjustments, and variety of image-enhancing effects.

It’s incredibly hard, and involves a good deal of luck, but if something is going to be a real Twitter successor/alternative, it needs to first and foremost find a way to get a critical mass of people using it. That can be a critical mass of a Twitter sub-culture, but it needs to be some group that moves in mass. App.Net get “Tech Twitter” to move, but it failed to get more than that (or to make them actually leave Twitter), but I don’t see that happening with Micro.Blog or Mastodon yet. I don’t know how you do that, but I think that’s how you get the momentum.
In 2016, Facebook introduced Marketplace, a feature allowing users to buy and sell items from people in their communities. As a replacement, consider Nextdoor, an app designed to keep you in the loop about what's happening in your neighborhood. It has a free and for sale section that, like Marketplace, emphasizes local offerings, and feels less sketchy than Craigslist.
Vero is a subscription based social network. It shows no ads and doesn’t collect data. It’s a totally different model to Facebook in the sense that Facebook needs user data in order to make money from them. Vero does collect some usage data which is used to see how often the app is used, but note that this option by default is off. Unlike Facebook where they have everything turned on and you have to go into your settings and turn them off.

Fb…just did that to me ..cut me off after a hacker hacked into my account. They’re asking for photo proof, age and my name..the list of documuments they will accept to send as proof is my ss card ..drivers licenses..things i’m not really sure i want them to see..they tell me to cover up some of the information but my address will still be visible. I even asked if this was FB. No response except they can not go future without proof..
Minds is an open source alternative to Facebook that values freedom of speech above all else. They do not censor post or videos because they disagree with them. Minds has a built in blogging system as well as video uploads. Best of all is Minds ability to use points to buy views for your post, enabling self-advertising on the site! Guest • Mar 2017 • 6 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree

A lot of people who've fled Facebook have made Instagram their new home—and they haven't let the fact that Facebook has owned the service since 2012 stop them. Instagram is best known as place to post photos of meals, sunsets, travel, and pets. Many also post selfies that are so carefully edited that they're unrecognizable. Others post videos or Snapchat-like stories that showcase 24 hours worth of photos and video that disappear at the end of the day. Like Twitter, it's fun to follow celebrities on Instagram—and through their photos see how the other half lives. On Instagram you can post publicly, share Stories with specific friends, or post privately.


Facebook has determined that they control thought, speech, and the right to sell your life to others. A syndicate of overreaching leftists! Opinion is just that. Everyone believes something in their inner most thought processes. The have the courage to share it, only to have the grimy boot of Facebook police squash their beliefs. All after they profit handsomely on your private life! Hate Facebook ,and wish there was a good alternative to what used to be a great social site. It is no longer. It is a thought control monster!
GitHub is a network for programmers, where developers can take help to develop their projects better. It provides tools for your programming needs along with codes you can fork for your own project. You can also choose to not make your code public but that requires a paid subscription. There’s also issue tracking, code reviews and more. If you would like to use something other than GitHub, there are a number of good alternatives.

The aptly named Hipster borrows a lot from Instagram, including the snappy photo shooting and all of the great filters you can apply to your photos. Hipster also allows you to add text captions to your photo "postcards" before sharing them, and then post your photos to Twiter, Facebook, Flickr, or Tumblr for others to see. It's fast, easy to use, and probably the simplest to get started with in the roundup.
Another interesting Instagram alternative is called Twitter. This is an online social networking platform where people can connect with others by making use of short content messages called Tweets. Many celebrities and famous personnel are using this app, where you can easily follow them and learn their stories by following their main account. Aside from that, you can also create your own tweets and share photos with your friends. This platform also offers some of the available filters that you can also find in Instagram. Moreover, Twitter on iPhone has a built-in editor for photos that is an additional super function.
I'm in the same boat. I'm as conservative as they come, but I was alarmed at all the racism and anti-Semitism over there. I started muting users over there (you can't completely block them) but now I'm realizing it may be just too hard. It's a shame since I would like to see a good Twitter alternative emerge in the future. Right now, Twitter is just too ingrained into our culture to be removed quite so easily.
There are also sister “apps” to Steemit that work within the Steem blockchain. These include DTube (a YouTube alternative), DMania (getting paid for memes), DLive (for live streaming) and Zappl (a Twitter alternative.) My very first Zap just read: “This is my very first Zappl and I have absolutely no idea what I’m doing,” and it earned me six cents. You can learn more about these apps by reading the Steemit story here. Steemit also has an active “in person” community, including a Steem Creators Conference that’s coming to Las Vegas in mid-April.
Someone seeking to join a Mastodon or Diaspora instance only needs to set up an account on the instance they want to join, no specialized tech knowledge needed. And both platforms are designed with ease of use in mind, so people joining will likely find the interfaces familiar enough to adopt quickly – the default Mastodon styles are similar to Twitter, for example.

People who enjoy sharing a photo on Twitter from time to time should switch to Instagram because the platform provides much more photo editing features. In addition to amazing photo effects you can use on Instagram, you can post videos, which last up to sixty seconds or Stories that also last less than one minute. The platform's aspect ratio restrictions have been lifted so, you can post square, horizontally and vertically oriented images or videos.
The problem is that Twitter does not preserve your privacy when you Tweet. Firstly, all your connections, who you follow and what you like or retweet is used as a way of profiling you. Secondly, all information about you can be subpoenad very easily. Twister is an alternative that does preserve your privacy and distributes info in a way that isn't centralized for one person/company to give away to others. JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 1 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree

The fragmentation that easily happens in decentralized networks can be a blessing, especially for groups that form around beliefs or identities where it can be hard to meet people safely. For instance, those belonging to marginalized groups, or folks with more fringe or misunderstood interests tend to appreciate the in-group feeling they get from a federated social network.
Unlike Twitter, Tumblr does not really have any hard restrictions on the users, apart from some policies preventing self-harm and suicide. A platform is an excellent place for businesses and advertisers for its visual nature. It supports photos, GIFs, Videos, audios, chats, quotes, links and everything that you can create with them as long as you do not violate its guidelines. Tumblr also provides needful tools to create interactive content that you can use for online promotion of a brand. It also features an integration with Google Analytics to track your posts’ performance.

You see, there are two types of people in this world, those who love Twitter and those who think that Twitter is nothing but a total waste. If you are the second one, then this article is for you. Here, I am going to post a few websites which are considered as the best alternatives of Twitter. So without uttering any more word, here we are discussing those sites.
A truly transnational campaign. Ahead of May elections @EuroAlter will send 5 caravans to 15 countries to meet social movements, NGOs, and citizens initiatives. Another Europe is not something to aspire to. But something that already exists on the ground.https://transeuropacaravans.eu/?fbclid=IwAR1GD7vRt7N5NxrEEww87vgwdO9ugI3waHFo9klWiHb-HNcmiB6nv2P2D9s …
Following local, national, and international news sources is a good place to start of course, but you can also keep an eye on relevant hashtags or create a Twitter list if you want to keep your news gathering separate from your socializing. For a boosted news experience on Twitter, connect your account to TweetDeck, where you’ve got more advanced search and filter tools.

@Zeb: Hi! Please consider putting this back on the roadmap. Our team members don’t want 2 apps going. When you do an universal search, you want it to search both tasks and chats in one platform, not check two. Also, you want to be able to create tasks on the fly while you’re chatting. Sometimes your previous chat message should actually be converted into a task which should be done in a click. There are so many messages that fly between a team that don’t “fit” into a task. Team chats are really essential to us and we would love to move from Flow but it doesn’t make sense logistically to go from one app to two because we want to simplify not complicate the process. Chat and tasks really should be linked.
×