Before there was Instagram, there was Flickr. And for many of us, this was our first online portal to have ones photography critiqued. Similar to Instagram, Flickr is a photo sharing platform but has more effective search tools, especially online. There are similarities in following and being followed but does not have the same mass audience as Instagram. Most of the feedback, positive or otherwise, will likely come from other photographers rather than prospective clients. That being said, top Flickr talent is seldom ignored, and the platform has launched many a career in the world of fine art and conceptual photography.
i have asked for instructions on how to get this to them..i have no idea how to send …no response …they say i have pertented to be someone else on this account. I have since the beginning of fb…i have had hackers before get in ..on this same acct. Never was ask to prove who i am…i am doing some serious thought of deleting my fb..they have locked me out…they are not talking to me…very controlling company they have become..personally i believe its poitical.. which ..if any of these social media are best for me to jump to.?

Why not have a standalone chat feature that integrates well with slack? Not sure how do-able that would be but it would be cool if you could send slack messages right from the Clickup chat session and vise versa -- sort of have them synconized. That way non-slack users still have built in chat and slack users can continue to use slack but the relevant message stream would be viewable from within the clickup chat feature. Not sure if it's possible ... maybe I'm dreaming ...
If you are a professional photographer or even a budding one, 500px is the place you should visit more often instead of Facebook. 500 px is a very strong photography community and along with interaction with other photographers, you will get to see some amazing pictures. The website also brings various tools and features for photographers. you can also check out other alternatives if you have some disliking to 500px.
If Gab doesn’t taste like your cup of coffee with its conservative undertoned discussion on alt-right topics, Mastodon could be your next social networking home. It is an open source Twitter alternative where you have complete control over your news feed and conversations. Since it is an open source platform, it gives you the freedom to set up your own little social media platform based on your set of interests.
A lot of people who've fled Facebook have made Instagram their new home—and they haven't let the fact that Facebook has owned the service since 2012 stop them. Instagram is best known as place to post photos of meals, sunsets, travel, and pets. Many also post selfies that are so carefully edited that they're unrecognizable. Others post videos or Snapchat-like stories that showcase 24 hours worth of photos and video that disappear at the end of the day. Like Twitter, it's fun to follow celebrities on Instagram—and through their photos see how the other half lives. On Instagram you can post publicly, share Stories with specific friends, or post privately.
Twitter has become a cultural icon since being introduced in 2006. Even President Donald Trump of the United States has gained notoriety for his use of Twitter. Users of the platform are able to send "tweets" which can be no longer than 280 characters. This is double the original limit of 140 characters. In some Asian languages, 140 characters remains the standard.

Here's what I think you'll find: Mastodon users are nice people. The wider federated network has posts in English, Japanese, Spanish, and from techy open source enthusiasts. It's way more queer and trans-friendly. Neurodivergent users are out and proud. Furries are all about it. I'm seeing more and more amazing artists posting their work. Sex workers exiled from other social media have even made their home on a Mastodon instance.


Tweetlist offers an excellent way to view lists and quickly switch between them. The Tweetlists tab is quick to access and you simply swipe left and right to view different lists. This client is very snappy and has excellent Voice Over accessibility support. Tweetlists also offers support for Twitlonger, Instapaper, and Read it Later. Another fantastic feature of Tweetlist is that conversations open automatically - if a tweet is part of a conversation, the entire conversation will be displayed upon tapping on the tweet.
These decentralized networks run on open-source software, which means anyone can contribute to the software to make it better, or download the code and modify it for their own instance. The software being open source doesn’t guarantee that the code itself is any more or less secure than the proprietary software that runs private social networks, but one of the main benefits of an open source platform is that anyone who has the technical knowledge can look “under the hood” and see exactly how Mastodon or Diaspora works.

500px is a money making machine and reward certain types of photography. (It’s also full of bots). Flickr was great, but it’s now a dinosaur. Tumblr is owned by Verizon and crippled with bots and porn. EyeEm is great as a platform to sell your images. Unsplash has a tremendous visibility but your work is then available for free even for commercial use. Behance is great to showcase projects, but not really made for sharing single images.
Flickr is another one of the best apps like Instagram. It is a photo and video-hosting program that is acquired by Yahoo in 2005. You can easily upload, edit and share your photos and videos via this platform. It is also available on all commonly used devices such as Android, iOS, Windows, and Linux. What makes Flickr different compared to Instagram is that it focuses on the appreciation of photography. If you are a photo enthusiast, this community is absolutely for you.
Join Robert Holden on a 4-Day retreat with Alternatives in the beautiful Montserrat Monastery in Catalonia Spain - Spiritual Growth and the Enneagram - last few places left - 11th-14th April https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/spiritual-growth-the-enneagram-with-robert-holden-retreat-in-montserrat-monastery-2019-registration-54112401650 …pic.twitter.com/gjZHeV7puk
There’s no end-to-end encryption on either platform’s private messaging at the moment, and to be fair there isn’t for Twitter or Facebook either (though Facebook is rumored to be looking into it for their Messenger). Both Mastodon and Diaspora are built on the idea that the conversations happening are meant to be public, so the privacy emphasis is on keeping user data in user ownership and out of advertiser’s hands, not keeping conversations out of the public eye.
The platform Diaspora is a social world online that puts your data back in your own hands, according to its own slogan. Its range of functions is similar to those of Facebook. Users can publish status updates, share posts and images, and comment on other people’s posts. And just like on Facebook, you can control who gets to see your own posts as well. Diaspora uses hashtags to order posts, meaning that you can use these to find like-minded people who share your interests. Linking Diaspora to your Facebook profile is also possible, and the software has its own chat function. Diaspora is also an open source project.
This idea is antithetical to current consumer marketing ethos, which strives to reach targeted audiences at scale. If you want targeting at scale, you go to Facebook or Google. Either can give you practically everyone in America who fits your target. To be fair, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest can all serve up pretty big targeted audiences.
One word of warning: Many dating apps require Facebook integration to work, meaning you won't be able to use them if you delete your account. You can still create a Tinder account without Facebook, but you will loose all your current matches and conversations. Hinge and Bumble require you to have a Facebook account to sign up, though the latter company says it's working on dropping that requirement.
Big Tech companies like Facebook and Twitter have taken advantage of our desire to do this. They “hooked” people then they manipulated what the users would see with algorithms. They collected every word you ever typed on social media and made assessments about you so they could sell that information to advertisers. They made a fortune off of every person who ever used their services, and deep down in the fine print, people gave them permission to do so.

Instagram's real appeal is the closed nature of its product—the fact that it's walled off by default, with no open browsing of user photos by just anyone, and before its Android release, built a brand off of being iPhone only, private, and that thing that a select few used to take photos on their phone and then, for fear that no one would see it, pushed it over to Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Flickr, or anywhere else that people actually hang out. Aside from design and marketing, there's little that makes the app special to this writer. (Your view may differ, and if so, that's cool. You should use Instagram!)
GitHub is a network for programmers, where developers can take help to develop their projects better. It provides tools for your programming needs along with codes you can fork for your own project. You can also choose to not make your code public but that requires a paid subscription. There’s also issue tracking, code reviews and more. If you would like to use something other than GitHub, there are a number of good alternatives.
At the end of the last year, the platform has increased the number of characters that can be used in a post, but this move did almost nothing to restore Twitter's former glory. Celebrities getting caught up in Twitter wars, fake accounts and ultra-right-wing supporters have all contributed to the current state of affairs on Twitter. Most people simply decide to use another social network that doesn't have the limitations imposed by a misguided company management and users that lack respect for everyone's right to free speech.
Minds enables growth of connections to occur quickly if you are highly involved on the site and produce good content, when taking into consideration the quantity of users on the site. Boosting of content and profile/channel views can be achieved (via a points system) and not merely bought. Minds also clearly rewards users with points for using the social media site itself, whether in accessing the site each hour or in uploading rich media content such as graphics or videos, unlike Facebook. Guest • Mar 2017 • 3 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree

It may be that ditching Facebook is not the answer, but rather restricting how your data is used and shared by the company. Facebook has just made its built-in privacy and data settings easier to use, redesigning its mobile app’s settings menu. “Instead of having settings spread across nearly 20 different screens, they’re now accessible from a single place,” it explained in a blog post announcing the change.


The official Twitter 4.0 for iPhone has a radically overhauled user interface which, while it might potentially make tweeting more discoverable and approachable to new, mainstream users, could also annoy and alienate long time, power users. Luckily, if you're one of he annoyed, the alienated, there are a variety of alternative Twitter apps in the App Store for you to choose from. These are some of our favorites, the ones we consider the very best, most must-have third party Twitter clients for iPhone and iPad.
Fella for Facebook is one of the most customizable replacements for the official Facebook application. You can choose between a number of colorful themes in this application, though this is a paid app, it’s currently on sale for $1, but it usually costs about $1.50. This app uses way less data than the regular Facebook app, which applies for pretty much all apps here, while you can also download videos from Facebook using this app, not to mention that it is available in over 35 languages.
Mini for Facebook is yet another solid option, it allows you to theme to your preference, while a pitch black theme for OLED displays is also available in settings. There are over 40 added features compared to the official Facebook application, and real-time push notifications are enabled in this application. If you want to download videos from Facebook, that’s not a problem either, as this app allows it. Mini for Facebook is free, but it comes with ads.
The terms and conditions are not worth the pixels or electrons that make up that agreement. Each and every agreement in the world contains the phrase "The provider of the service reserves the right to change the terms of this agreement at any time without prior notification". If the owner of the site where you store your images decides to block your access to those images or to the site, what are you going to do?
The best replacement is a password manager, which can store your credentials for every site you use in one place. It can also generate a new, secure password every time you sign up for a new website or service. Here's an in-depth guide to choosing the best password manager for you and why you should be using one. Our two favorite picks are 1Password and LastPass.

For those determined to exit the Facebook ecosystem, the best approach is more likely to be a patchwork of sites and apps that mirror individual features. Messaging is the easiest: apps such as Telegram and Signal offer messaging and group chats, as well as voice calls, with encryption to keep your communications private. Telegram even has a thriving collection of chatbots, similar to Facebook Messenger.

Lots of services can feed you the latest news. Facebook, though, displays the specific stories your friends and family are talking about. If you value that feature, Nuzzel is a great choice. You can sync the app to other social networks you might use, like Twitter and LinkedIn, and it will feed you the articles your friends, as well as friends of friends, are talking about. The app also has a "Best of Nuzzel" feature where you can see the stories being widely discussed across the whole platform.
Arguably, this has been a long time coming. A multitude of changes that regular users saw no need for, confusing direction and changes at the top (founder Jack Dorsey left, then returned) have left Twitter’s raison d’etre somewhat confused. Is Twitter really for social networking, or is it for microblogging? Or, as the results of a 2016 survey show, is it best used for contacting customer services departments of major manufacturers and retailers?
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