For my money, at least, I'd much rather you focus on solving the other ten zillion things than go up against Slack. You'll have a hard time displacing Slack for us, and I'm confident nearly everyone we work with would say the same. Even if we liked CU's chat, we'd still have Slack open for the other 15 teams I chat with, so we'd end up going right back to it, methinks…
The aptly named Hipster borrows a lot from Instagram, including the snappy photo shooting and all of the great filters you can apply to your photos. Hipster also allows you to add text captions to your photo "postcards" before sharing them, and then post your photos to Twiter, Facebook, Flickr, or Tumblr for others to see. It's fast, easy to use, and probably the simplest to get started with in the roundup.
Realistically, Facebook has the advantage of scale – everyone is on it, and it’s not going to be easy to get enough people to switch over to a new network to make it a viable alternative. Networks that focus on niche communities may have better luck, but for average users, the best option is probably to pick a network that appeals to you, join up, explore, and cross-post with your regular social media. Like it or not, Facebook and Twitter are dominant, and any serious competitor is going to have to integrate with them to at least some degree to make switching a softer move for the users.
Plurk utilizes a horizontal timeline, with messages summarized by single verbs (“feels”, “loves”, etc.). As you would expect, media files can be shared, and Plurks can be liked. Emoticons are an important element of the Plurk user experience, and your selection increases as your karma grows. Karma is based on your activity on the social networking site. Group chat and direct messaging are also featured on Plurk.

If you're looking for a photo editing app that lets you do more than dress up your images, something that really lets you fine-tune them, Snapseed is the ticket. Snapseed is PCMag's Editors' Choice for iPhone camera apps. We love its non-destructive editing capabilities, powerful photo correction, localized adjustments, and variety of image-enhancing effects.

My American cousins would describe this selection to be "out of left-field" and rightly so. Steller is more of a story sharing app, and at it's best combines excellent photography paired with engaging narratives. Stellar's story building tools are template based, simple to use and make your content look slick very quickly. It has a similar feed scroll feel to Instagram, but clicking on a title page lets you delve into an in-depth project rather than just a collection of hashtags and comments.
When someone runs their own instance of Mastodon or Diaspora, it becomes like their own clubhouse, where they can set their own themes for the group and rules. Though most of these spaces are very open for anyone to join, these decentralized social networks often center around a similar identity, interest, or cause specifically to filter their membership to like-minded folks.

There’s no end-to-end encryption on either platform’s private messaging at the moment, and to be fair there isn’t for Twitter or Facebook either (though Facebook is rumored to be looking into it for their Messenger). Both Mastodon and Diaspora are built on the idea that the conversations happening are meant to be public, so the privacy emphasis is on keeping user data in user ownership and out of advertiser’s hands, not keeping conversations out of the public eye.
Snapchat is a brilliant alternative to Instagram. This is a multimedia messaging app for iPhone and Android users. You can share your photos from here easily. In this app, you can set the time of your chat visibility. Aside from that, what separates Snapchat from the rest is that all photos and videos being shared will disappear in a few seconds after being viewed. When it comes to capturing photos, this app has a variety of filters that you can use to make your capturing experience more fun and enjoyable.
BuddyPress can be a Facebook alternative, depending on your needs. It's a Wordpress add-on, which means if you self-host or have hosted for you a Wordpress blog or website, you can add BP to enable you to create a social network of your own. Do it on your server and keep your privacy! JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 4 agrees and 2 disagrees Disagree   Agree

Flickr has had its ups and downs in the last few years, but the photo hosting service is worth considering as a way to edit and share images when you're on the go. With the Flickr app, you can shoot, upload, and geo-tag your photos. It has an easy-to-use interface and acts as a simple tool for moving photos you shoot on your phone to the cloud. Additionally, the Flickr app lets you apply a few filters and a caption, and also lets you share with Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, or email. It doesn't have as many editing bells and whistles as some of the other Instagram alternatives, but if you're looking for a simple photo-sharing app that offers basic photo enhancements, this is the app for you.

At the end of the last year, the platform has increased the number of characters that can be used in a post, but this move did almost nothing to restore Twitter's former glory. Celebrities getting caught up in Twitter wars, fake accounts and ultra-right-wing supporters have all contributed to the current state of affairs on Twitter. Most people simply decide to use another social network that doesn't have the limitations imposed by a misguided company management and users that lack respect for everyone's right to free speech.
Here's the thing—putting aside the fact that some very vocal iOS users are very upset that their precious app has descended to the likes of Android users (let's be clear, some iOS users, not all - most people understand that the device you use, OS you prefer, or browser you surf with is not who you are) and the social commentary the whole depressing fiasco gives us, the truth is that while Instagram has great hype, slick sex appeal, and a bolted-on social aspect, it doesn't do anything that a half-dozen other apps for iOS and Android don't do. In fact, some of those Android apps do it just as well or better.
@Lee Fuhr: Totally agree, For us I say leave this and use a tool built for the job - i.e. slack, I don't wish to have yet one more "chat" app on my phone and other devices, slack does the job well, supports multiple accounts and a bunch of cool stuff including clickup integration - why re-invent a nice round wheel which already comes with neat white walls? :)
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