Look familiar? We originally published this post shortly after Facebook's acquisition of and the Android launch of Instagram. We were concerned then about the influence Facebook would have on it, and now it's borne fruit in the form of an invasive terms-of-service agreement. The agreement gives Instagram rights to and ownership of your photos to sell and use in ads as they see fit. Sure, you probably don't care if they sell that photo of your coffee foam, but you and your friends may care if they sell photos of your faces or likenesses to a company that uses your shot in their ad material. Unfortunately, at this stage the only way to opt-out is to close your account and move to another service, like some of these great alternatives.
The Nextdoor mobile app for Android and iOS is a great way for people to keep up with the Joneses, the Kardashians, or anyone else in your neighborhood. Whether you want to make friends with your neighbors; are looking to easily sell your stuff; want to hire a babysitter, house sitter, or dog walker; or get informed about yard sales, what you need may be as close as a neighbor a few doors away. Nextdoor has also become a popular place for posts that alert users to nearby criminal activity and for sharing critical info during an earthquake or flood, for example.
Facebook has been and remains the undisputed king of the social network market. Granted, in some regions of the world, like Russia or China for example, there is a more level playing field with the success of popular alternatives to Facebook who take an equal market share. But for the most part, Facebook is the worldwide leader when it comes to social interaction online. If you’re using the platform, you’ve got no choice but to accept the network’s settings on privacy and data protection and live with them. If you don’t want to do this, then you’ll have to find a good and conservative alternative to Facebook – and either convince all of your friends, family, colleagues, and acquaintances to join you, or be prepared for the fact that your online friendship circle will be significantly reduced (to begin with at least).
Secondly, there are regular competitions or "Missions" with specific briefs. Prizes come in various forms such as being published in an exhibition, having your work used in commercial campaigns, or cold hard cash. This is a great way for marketing teams of commercial brands or exhibition curators to hunt for new, enthusiastic talent. This gives any aspiring photographer the feeling that the playing field has been leveled, and if the quality is there, then you wont be ignored.
One feature that’s specific to the business model for EyeEm is that users can offer their own photos voluntarily on the startup’s marketplace. EyeEm sells these images with stock licenses to Getty Images and other purchasers. Users then receive a share of the revenue generated. This means that EyeEm isn’t just a platform for displaying images – you can make money from them too. And it’s not just an incentive for the user to post as high-quality photographic content as possible: the social network itself requires this in order to finance its business through advertising.
Here’s what Mastodon is: an open-source, community-run microblogging website. It lets you post “toots,” and you can “boost” other users’ posts. It’s mostly like Twitter, but instead of living in one place, the social network lives in different chunks, called “instances,” each with its own rules and administrators. That’s what makes up a “federation,” and it protects the integrity of the service—there is no single, central server. So, if one instance stops paying for their internet or forgets to re-up their URL, the rest are unharmed in their semi-permeable silos.

Vero is a subscription based social network. It shows no ads and doesn’t collect data. It’s a totally different model to Facebook in the sense that Facebook needs user data in order to make money from them. Vero does collect some usage data which is used to see how often the app is used, but note that this option by default is off. Unlike Facebook where they have everything turned on and you have to go into your settings and turn them off.


Another worry with deleting Facebook is that without it, you won't be able to remember anyone's birthday. Luckily, there's a way to export your friends' birthdays directly from Facebook before you delete your account. First, log into the social network, then click Events on the left-hand side. Toward the bottom, there's an option to add events to your calendar of choice, like Microsoft Outlook, Google Calendar, or Apple Calendar. There, tap "Learn More." You'll be led to a full set of instructions for how to export all your friends' birthdays.
Pros & Cons Using Twitter For eLearning: What eLearning professionals should know! 8 pros and 6 cons on How To Use Twitter For eLearning!advantage using twitterpros and cons of trump using twitterbenefits of twitter in educationpros and cons of twitter for businessnegatives of twitterteachers using twitter in the classroomPeople also search for ...
There are also sister “apps” to Steemit that work within the Steem blockchain. These include DTube (a YouTube alternative), DMania (getting paid for memes), DLive (for live streaming) and Zappl (a Twitter alternative.) My very first Zap just read: “This is my very first Zappl and I have absolutely no idea what I’m doing,” and it earned me six cents. You can learn more about these apps by reading the Steemit story here. Steemit also has an active “in person” community, including a Steem Creators Conference that’s coming to Las Vegas in mid-April.
This sudden purge has caused many users to be concerned that they too could be deleted without warning, and has caused businesses to pause and reconsider pushing their advertising and marketing efforts through Facebook. As a result, a number of people are considering alternative Facebook sources. (You can see a list of sites that Facebook purged on Heavy’s story here.) 
My American cousins would describe this selection to be "out of left-field" and rightly so. Steller is more of a story sharing app, and at it's best combines excellent photography paired with engaging narratives. Stellar's story building tools are template based, simple to use and make your content look slick very quickly. It has a similar feed scroll feel to Instagram, but clicking on a title page lets you delve into an in-depth project rather than just a collection of hashtags and comments.

This is one of the oldest Facebook alternatives out there and also one of the most unique in terms of its setup. Rather than being owned by a single company, the open-source Diaspora software can be run by anyone who wants to set up a server. Users can choose which “pod” they want their account information to be stored on and set up an account there. Once their data is on that server, they can interact with any other user on the network, regardless of host location.


It’s not exactly a secret that the official Facebook app is not battery friendly, and luckily for all of us, there are some alternatives out there. Of course, Facebook’s other official app, Facebook Lite, comes to mind, and is a good alternative, but if you’re not a fan of Facebook Lite either, and are looking for a third-party alternative, we’re here to help. In the list provided down below, you will be able to find 10 applications which can replace Facebook and Facebook Lite applications. Now, it is worth noting that all of these apps are more or less mobile site wrappers, but they’re all skinned in one way or the other, altered by the developer, so that they feel completely different. These apps have evolved quite a bit in the last couple of years, so if you’re interested in testing them out, check out the list down below, but before you do, please do not that these apps are not listed in a specific order.
While a free speech focused service might not seem unreasonable, it hasn’t worked out well for Gab so far. Its mobile app was banned in 2016 from the Apple App Store due to adult content. In 2017, meanwhile, Google removed the app from the Play Store for violating its hate speech policy, noting that Gab failed to “demonstrate a sufficient level of moderation, including for content that encourages violence and advocates hate against groups of people.”
Twitter, the platform I once loved, has turned into a terrible place. It's become a way to pervert the political discourse, to enable trolls, and to fuel the spread of conspiracy theories. And that's just lately. Seeing people I generally like and agree with subtweeting and attacking others—on top of the world's perpetually bleak news—has begun to gnaw away at my mental health and spiritual wellbeing. It simply isn't what I signed up for.

Last year, Mastodon made splashes as an open source Twitter competitor but you can also use it as a Facebook alternative. Apart from all the differences in terms of privacy, character length, what really sets Mastodon apart is the “instance” feature. You can think of the service as a series of connected nodes (instances) and your account belongs to a particular instance.

An exciting Facebook alternative that was released in 2015, but has only recently seen a huge influx of new users, is the social network, Vero. At the beginning of March 2018, for example, CEO Ayman Harari, worth billions of euros, announced an increase of more than three million users, after Vero had previously been a relatively niche app with around 200,000 active members. Not only effective influencer campaigns played an important role, but also the current offer of free lifetime membership won users over. The app, which is available for iOS, and Android, might only be available with a paid annual subscription in the future. However, the offer has been initially extended until further notice.


I don’t expect to move over to either of these as my main social network, but Twitter’s latest waves of jack-assery has kickstarted the conversation again. There are a few problems with these other services, but the main thing is that they just haven’t managed to get enough people to stick around and use them for long. People tend to try them and bounce off them pretty quickly. I know I have bounced off each of them numerous times.
LinkedIn has been a popular platform for professionals and it continues to remain so. LinkedIn gives you the ability to interact with other professionals, recruit employees and find jobs. It’s also great if you want to be up to date on the latest business and industry news. There’s also LinkedIn Pulse if you want to share new ideas with other big names of the industry.
Everything from photos and messages to mobile phone numbers of everyone in your phone. They also have all your text messages you’ve made on your cell phone! It’s crazy how much they have. And with the recent Facebookl CA scandal, people are now looking for alternatives to Facebook where privacy is respected and private information is never shared or sold to other companies or organisations.
StatusNet funktioniert für den Anwender wie Twitter – oft funktionieren sogar die gleichen Clients mit Twitter und StatusNet. Administratoren können sich aber selbst einen Server einrichten und sind damit nicht direkt abhängig vom Funktionieren einer zentralen Infrastruktur. Wer will, kann sogar einen Twitter‐​ähnlichen Dienst nur für den internen Gebrauch zum Beispiel in einer Firma einrichten.
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If all that has you thinking about deleting Facebook entirely, you're far from alone. (Quitting the social network is also somewhat of a first-world privilege, since for many people Facebook functions as the entire internet itself.) But going cold turkey can be hard; Facebook actually provides useful services sometimes, and there's no one-for-one replacement.
For more general news that can delight and surprise, try Digg, an aggregation site that prioritizes deeply reported features on a range of topics as well as lots of fun and quirky news stories. And of course, iPhone and iPad owners can always just fire up Apple News if they don't want to bother setting up a whole new system. None of those fit the bill? Here's a deeper look at Facebook News Feed alternatives.
Facebook kind of took the internet world by storm when it went global in 2006 and it is arguably the biggest social network now. We all have a Facebook account and it would be lying if anyone said they haven’t had one ever. Facebook has been loved so much by people and it continues to add new features in a bid to remain at the top of the social network world. But there are times when we get a little saturated by Facebook and want a new fresh alternative. Although the truth is, there are no worthy Facebook alternatives.
Before Snapseed there was Camera+. Its photoediting features are a lot better than Instagram’s, and even though it’s not as fully featured as Snapseed, you might like it more because it’s cheaper and bit easier to use. Other than the great filters provided, the best thing about Camera+ is the ability to capture photos by setting the exposure at a different point than the focus (something most camera apps don’t let you do). For only $0.99 Camera+ might be the most cost effective Instagram alternative.
Something that makes SmugMug an excellent Instagram alternative is the ability to download entire galleries so they’re available offline for when your signal isn’t the strongest. This can be a lifesaver, especially if you’re using your account as a professional photographer. You can also share images directly from the app via SMS, email and social media, so it’s not limited to face-to-face sharing.
It’s early days for the app but it already has users from over 30 different countries, and there are thousands of photographers, media managers and content creators using Dayflash to share their aesthetic. We love the focus that Dayflash has on providing creators with a platform for their art, and because you can link your Instagram, the app is a nice way to get extra exposure if it’s still your go-to image sharing site.

Last year, after Twitter began moving away from a purely chronological feed, Rochko began building the back end for what would become Mastodon. Instead of building a unified service, Rochko envisioned something more like email, or RSS: a distributed system that lets you send public messages to anyone who follows you on the service. Anyone can create a server and host their own instance of Mastodon, and Mastodon works in the background to connect them. (source)
In 2016, Facebook introduced Marketplace, a feature allowing users to buy and sell items from people in their communities. As a replacement, consider Nextdoor, an app designed to keep you in the loop about what's happening in your neighborhood. It has a free and for sale section that, like Marketplace, emphasizes local offerings, and feels less sketchy than Craigslist.
@Zach Snader I actually somewhat disagree with @Lee Fuhr. I think this would be a great feature. I like Slack, but at the same time I don't. I like it because i know how to use it, but when dealing with teams and clients (especially), some people may not understand how to use Slack. I've seen it many times with people in my circles. For example courses and memberships held within Slack. Navigating the interface was too difficult for some people and they didn't know how to reply and keep a conversation in one thread. And many people complained about it. The idea isn't to compete with Slack, but to innovate and create something that caters to those who aren't necessarily Slack's ideal users.
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