Realistically, Facebook has the advantage of scale – everyone is on it, and it’s not going to be easy to get enough people to switch over to a new network to make it a viable alternative. Networks that focus on niche communities may have better luck, but for average users, the best option is probably to pick a network that appeals to you, join up, explore, and cross-post with your regular social media. Like it or not, Facebook and Twitter are dominant, and any serious competitor is going to have to integrate with them to at least some degree to make switching a softer move for the users.
Facebook’s ongoing security and privacy issues 4 Reasons Why Facebook Is a Security and Privacy Nightmare 4 Reasons Why Facebook Is a Security and Privacy Nightmare Facebook is no longer the king of the social media castle. If you value your anonymity, security, and privacy, here are some great reasons to quit Facebook today. Read More mean young people are leaving in their droves. According to Pew Research, 44 percent of users aged 18 to 29 said they deleted the app in the last year. Given they are also the demographic who are most likely to understand Facebook’s confusing privacy settings (64 percent), this is all rather worrying.
PicPlz used to be my personal favorite, until pressure from Instagram on Android forced them to shut down. In their place though, a new challenger has risen—one with an old name. Flickr's new Android app brings most—if not all—of the same features that Instagram offers and combines them with Flickr's own photo-centric social network where your photos belong to you and no one else. Flickr's new Android app lets you take photos straight from your camera and apply filters to them if you choose, then share them with friends on Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, or anywhere else you choose.
All of this stuff was total catnip for me. After all, what Twitter does isn't that impressive. If anything, Twitter's made its elegant platform significantly worse over the last few years, changing the "favorite" icon, introducing a higher character count, pushing obnoxious "suggestions," and messing up the chronological timeline in favor of an algorithmically-generated one. And then there’s the user-hostile API changes that might spell doom for third-party Twitter clients. It's no wonder that even loyal users are fed up.
It's like twitter, but minus the stuff you don't like, and made better. It introduces instances, which are connected but are their own separate site with their own rules and moderation, It has a 500 character limit for every "toot", and most of the instances have an amazing community from what I can tell. It honestly is the best alternative to Twitter. Veencorr • Mar 2018 • 3 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
You don't get any of this on Mastodon. The flagship instance (which, at the moment, has again closed itself off to new users) is moderated with stricter rules than Twitter, banning users for stuff like Holocaust denial and posting Nazi imagery. If you have friends on another instance, or want to exist a little out of the mainstream, there's a handy finder that can help you locate your new microblogging home. Niches built around Star Trek and anime already exist, so no matter if the main site is still open to new users, you can still exist in the "fediverse."
Facebook has been and remains the undisputed king of the social network market. Granted, in some regions of the world, like Russia or China for example, there is a more level playing field with the success of popular alternatives to Facebook who take an equal market share. But for the most part, Facebook is the worldwide leader when it comes to social interaction online. If you’re using the platform, you’ve got no choice but to accept the network’s settings on privacy and data protection and live with them. If you don’t want to do this, then you’ll have to find a good and conservative alternative to Facebook – and either convince all of your friends, family, colleagues, and acquaintances to join you, or be prepared for the fact that your online friendship circle will be significantly reduced (to begin with at least).
Twitter that started as the fastest growing microblogging platform almost about a decade ago seems to be dying with its lack of innovation and senseless censorship. Looking at the current stats, Twitter’s active users have been reduced to 330 million worldwide. The platform is struggling to keep its users interested. Over the past few years, it has introduced GIF and Video support, and other exciting features which were too late to introduce to Social Media. Twitter in current form seems to have no life, except for some tweets from Beyonce and Trump. It started from being an ordinary man’s social platform to a network where people sign up to read what their favorite celebrities are tweeting, and it is failing in that too, as all the celebrities are moving to better-structured platforms like Instagram. This has pushed the bluebird away from our lives and left us with no choice but to look for Twitter alternatives.
Twitter profiles can be customized with photos and headers. Users are also able to follow other Twitter users. Many famous people use the platform to communicate with the masses. Twitter has also become a source for news. During the 2016 United States election, more than 40 million tweets were sent about election results. One of the reasons Twitter is so popular in this regard is that breaking news can be conveyed immediately. It can often be tweeted faster than it can be reported by major news outlets.
@Zeb: Hi! Please consider putting this back on the roadmap. Our team members don’t want 2 apps going. When you do an universal search, you want it to search both tasks and chats in one platform, not check two. Also, you want to be able to create tasks on the fly while you’re chatting. Sometimes your previous chat message should actually be converted into a task which should be done in a click. There are so many messages that fly between a team that don’t “fit” into a task. Team chats are really essential to us and we would love to move from Flow but it doesn’t make sense logistically to go from one app to two because we want to simplify not complicate the process. Chat and tasks really should be linked.
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