Buffer is actually one of the most popular apps from this list. This is basically a social media management application, as it allows you to schedule posts and track the performance of your content on various social media channels, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and Google+. This app offers a simple design, and it’s a great solution if you need to schedule posts on any of the aforementioned social media channels, Facebook included, but it can also serve you as an app to check your Facebook feed, of course.
Karolis Rimkus began building his successful dropshipping store through influencer marketing: “At first I did a lot of influencer outreach. I would offer micro influencers, people with like 8,000 followers, an item they could make a giveaway with, or just send them a few free items in exchange for mentions. It worked, and I was growing and making sales.”

Users are allowed to self-censor by flagging (although flagging is discouraged), and they vote on the merits of a post through upvotes, much like you would “like” a Facebook post or upvote a Reddit submission. But the big thing that makes Steemit stand out is that you get paid for your posts in the form of Steem cryptocurrency, based on how many votes your posts get. And you also get paid based on your own curation of other people’s posts, and the upvotes that your comments on posts receive.
Tweetbot by Tapbots is it a beauty. A text review can hardly do this app justice because it is impossible to put into words how beautifully Tweetbot is made. Sure, I can describe how, at your touch, a tweet slides up revealing a navigation bar while simultaneous emitting the perfect sound. I can explain that swiping a tweet to right reveals the conversation and swiping to left displays related tweets. I can tell you about smart gestures, multiple timelines, and customizable navigation. I can even spew out a concrete list of every feature that Tweetbot includes. What I can’t provide you, however, is the experience.
[AGENDA] Apply to the School for Transnational Activism and participate in a series of 3 workshops in Warsaw, Rijeka and Palermo #migrantsrights #citizenship #feminism #gender #climatejustice #data and #digitalrights https://www.citizensforeurope.eu/agenda/call-for-applications-school-of-transnational-activism … via @EuroAlter Deadline 22 April!pic.twitter.com/MSnUOILZzo
But regardless of whether you’re using Twitter, Instagram, or Google+: Awareness and consideration about privacy and data protection are also important factors in choosing to use any of the other social media giants. One common complaint targeted specifically at Facebook is that that Facebook Newsfeed algorithms decide exactly what you do and don’t see. Another problem is personalized advertising, which is of course only possible through accessing and interpreting personal user data. As you can see: the list of criticisms for the social network market leader is long. So it’s good news that there are a few other alternatives to Facebook on the market. Some of these Facebook alternatives are more conservative, offer less advertising, others offer improved data protection, and some even offer extended functions and features that aren’t currently available for Facebook customers.
There’s always a risk that a network turns into a home solely for niche sites, alienating folks who are simply looking for a new home – the experiment that was (and still is) SecondLife springs to mind. Most detractors of decentralized networks say that they’re too niche, and maybe a bit too nerdy, to ever catch on enough to supplant something like Facebook. Really though, only time will tell.
One of Facebook's most useful features isn't the main app itself, but its spinoff app Messenger. But while Messenger makes it easy to chat with Facebook friends, it's also confusing and riddled with unnecessary clutter. If you're looking for a clean and easy-to-use messaging app, try Signal. It's a free, end-to-end encrypted messaging service, approved by security researchers, that sticks to the basics. There are no animated stickers or fancy chat bots, but Signal does an excellent job of keeping you securely connected to your friends and family.
LinkedIn has been a popular platform for professionals and it continues to remain so. LinkedIn gives you the ability to interact with other professionals, recruit employees and find jobs. It’s also great if you want to be up to date on the latest business and industry news. There’s also LinkedIn Pulse if you want to share new ideas with other big names of the industry.
Oracle Social Cloud is a social media management and communication tool that serves multiple departments, including marketing, sales, customer service, and commerce. Oracle integrates its social media tools with a host of Customer Experience apps. Oracle enables marketers to generate awareness, drive demand and boost sales. Read more about Oracle Social Cloud
Those who are more addicted to capturing photographs of all routine life moments and love to update them on social media sites are advised to move towards Instagram. It is easier to use and the interactive design make it standout as a popular competitor against Facebook. Currently, about 400 million active users get connected to this site per month and the average user count is becoming more and more.
SteamZoo has long been touted as a great—if not better-alternative to Instagram, partially because of the way it turns editing and sharing your photos into more of a social game that's addictive to play. You can earn badges—much like FourSquare—for sharing photos, adding effects and borders, or even for taking pictures of specific subjects, like your dog or your dinner. Whether you encourage the behavior or not, StreamZoo is a pretty addictive app to use.
At the end of the last year, the platform has increased the number of characters that can be used in a post, but this move did almost nothing to restore Twitter's former glory. Celebrities getting caught up in Twitter wars, fake accounts and ultra-right-wing supporters have all contributed to the current state of affairs on Twitter. Most people simply decide to use another social network that doesn't have the limitations imposed by a misguided company management and users that lack respect for everyone's right to free speech.
If you use Facebook for those purposes, you should check out NextDoor, the local social network Why You Need to Be on Nextdoor, the Local Social Network Why You Need to Be on Nextdoor, the Local Social Network Nextdoor is a free, private, local social network for people that live in a neighborhood. And it's probably the best social network you haven't joined yet. Read More . Aside from the security benefits, it’s much more suited to community use that Facebook. It’s the best community-driven Facebook alternative.
This platform is aiming to be the best place to show your work on your smartphone either for fun or for business, and it’s doing a pretty good job of achieving this. You can’t create galleries directly on the app, but what you can do is create them ahead of time on your computer and then have them in your pocket ready for whenever you need to show off your work.
Following local, national, and international news sources is a good place to start of course, but you can also keep an eye on relevant hashtags or create a Twitter list if you want to keep your news gathering separate from your socializing. For a boosted news experience on Twitter, connect your account to TweetDeck, where you’ve got more advanced search and filter tools.

It used to be Instagram’s biggest rival but many feel that Hipstamatic lost the war. That doesn’t mean you can’t get better images from Hipstamatic than Instagram though. The beauty of Hipstamatic is that you can completely customize your camera to take unique pictures. With Hipstamatic you can change your virtual lens, film, or flash to find your own unique take on photography. Share your photos with other friends right in the app, or export them to your preferred social network.
“In the future, MeWe will also revolutionize social media with decentralization, which will render Facebook’s spying and tracking data model completely obsolete,” Weinstein added, a comment that suggests he is indeed trying to replace Facebook. “Awareness around the world has never been higher regarding news feed manipulation and privacy infractions. Government regulations will never truly interfere with Facebook’s data collection model, evidenced in both California’s new 2020 privacy rules and Europe’s GDPR. But the free market can — and MeWe is here giving people great communication technology in a true multi-feature platform, with none of Facebook’s BS.” (source)

Facebook has been and remains the undisputed king of the social network market. Granted, in some regions of the world, like Russia or China for example, there is a more level playing field with the success of popular alternatives to Facebook who take an equal market share. But for the most part, Facebook is the worldwide leader when it comes to social interaction online. If you’re using the platform, you’ve got no choice but to accept the network’s settings on privacy and data protection and live with them. If you don’t want to do this, then you’ll have to find a good and conservative alternative to Facebook – and either convince all of your friends, family, colleagues, and acquaintances to join you, or be prepared for the fact that your online friendship circle will be significantly reduced (to begin with at least).
In 2016, Facebook introduced Marketplace, a feature allowing users to buy and sell items from people in their communities. As a replacement, consider Nextdoor, an app designed to keep you in the loop about what's happening in your neighborhood. It has a free and for sale section that, like Marketplace, emphasizes local offerings, and feels less sketchy than Craigslist.
There’s always a risk that a network turns into a home solely for niche sites, alienating folks who are simply looking for a new home – the experiment that was (and still is) SecondLife springs to mind. Most detractors of decentralized networks say that they’re too niche, and maybe a bit too nerdy, to ever catch on enough to supplant something like Facebook. Really though, only time will tell.
Now to Steemit. They claim to prevent spammers from posting excessively they limit your posts. Want to upload and share some photos or maybe use the connected DTube ,YouTube alternative, to upload a video go right ahead. You will quickly be silenced and forbidden from posting any further unless you are willing to pay. If you become popular this will go away some due to the fact that you will get more people liking your content and it will give you more “steem power” so much like high school if you are popular you can share your opinion, but if you are not be prepared to pay if you want to comment on that post. This along with the fact that 80-90% of the content is about crypto currency and people talking about Whales while telling minnows to shut up and a two week wait to even set up your account bored me very quickly. It is a horrible platform for anyone other then those who want to eat, think, dream, and talk about crypto 24/7 and who are willing to wait ages to be popular enough to talk about it freely.

From the planning side, collecting peoples' contact info can be a pain, sure. But that's a one-time bother. From there, use Paperless Post for beautiful and functional email invites and RSVP tracking. And for more rote calendar-coordination, use Doodle to find the best day for a dinner or meeting that works for everyone. The site lets each guest respond with a time that works for them, so you can easily figure out how best to accommodate everyone's schedule.
You’ll need a server for this, as per our guide to creating your own Mastodon instance Your Own Social Network: How to Set Up a Mastodon Instance on Linux Your Own Social Network: How to Set Up a Mastodon Instance on Linux Twitter's echo chamber is stifling discussion. If you want to get people talking, you can create your own social network with Mastodon. All you need is a web domain and server to get started... Read More .
Polaroid's resurrection continued in 2016 with the release of their social multimedia platform SW/NG, and I'd put it down as one of the most under-rated social mobile platforms around. Forget Instagram Boomerangs, SW/NG brings pictures to life much in the same way Live Photos does on iPhone. Using the app feels similar to Instagram with the continued scroll of your feed, but pictures move as you scroll. The app feels cleaner than Instagram, and encourages users to think differently when composing an image given that a moving subject or background is more compelling.
In the last quarter of 2017, Twitter had only 330 million users, much less than Facebook that had 2,07 billion users or Instagram that had approximately 700 million users over that same period. Despite being easy to use and a powerful tool for reaching like-minded people or potential customers for your company's products Twitter is slowly losing the reputation it once had.
Tinfoil is a little bit older, but many people still swear by it. Tinfoil’s claim to fame is being a Facebook app that doesn’t ask for any of your permissions, hence the name. It’s a web-wrapper like many of these. Thus, most of its features are similar to the web version. The update schedule is a tad unpredictable. It's completely free with no ads and no in-app purchases. That makes it hard to complain too much.

Phoenix is an app that can replace both your Facebook and (Facebook) Messenger applications. This app supports custom layouts and themes, while the same can be said for voice calling as well. Chat heads feature is supported by the application, and the developer has made a custom photo viewer for the application, and the same can be said for a video player as well. This app also offers a familiar design which has been somewhat adapted by the developer, of course, for the better.

Unlike Twitter, Instagram doesn’t have a word limit on its posts, although the users insist that there is a cap after 2,200 characters, which is relatively long anyway. Instagram allows three types of posts: picture, video, and GIF. It also features hashtags and allows up to 30 hashtags on a single post. There is a Direct Message facility to send texts, photos, videos, GIFs and stickers to anyone on the platform, even Beyonce. Addition to that, it has Stories, which is a status update with photos and videos with 24 hours of life, after which they are automatically deleted.
If you're friends with hundreds or thousands of people on Facebook, it understandably might not be worthwhile to put them all in your Gcal. In this case, it might be easiest just to take 20 minutes or so to add your close friends and family member's special days to your calendar. And really, did the annual onslaught of best wishes on Facebook add much to your life in the first place?
The world's fascination with Twitter was well-deserved because this social network offered unique features that actually foster public discussions and that can enable marketers to reach more users of the products they are advertising. Ten years ago, Twitter was one of the rare platforms that offered these opportunities, but today there are countless social media networks which provide the same service while making sure that their users are happy.
In 2016, Facebook introduced Marketplace, a feature allowing users to buy and sell items from people in their communities. As a replacement, consider Nextdoor, an app designed to keep you in the loop about what's happening in your neighborhood. It has a free and for sale section that, like Marketplace, emphasizes local offerings, and feels less sketchy than Craigslist.
The official Twitter 4.0 for iPhone has a radically overhauled user interface which, while it might potentially make tweeting more discoverable and approachable to new, mainstream users, could also annoy and alienate long time, power users. Luckily, if you're one of he annoyed, the alienated, there are a variety of alternative Twitter apps in the App Store for you to choose from. These are some of our favorites, the ones we consider the very best, most must-have third party Twitter clients for iPhone and iPad.
Why not have a standalone chat feature that integrates well with slack? Not sure how do-able that would be but it would be cool if you could send slack messages right from the Clickup chat session and vise versa -- sort of have them synconized. That way non-slack users still have built in chat and slack users can continue to use slack but the relevant message stream would be viewable from within the clickup chat feature. Not sure if it's possible ... maybe I'm dreaming ...
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