Twitter, the platform I once loved, has turned into a terrible place. It's become a way to pervert the political discourse, to enable trolls, and to fuel the spread of conspiracy theories. And that's just lately. Seeing people I generally like and agree with subtweeting and attacking others—on top of the world's perpetually bleak news—has begun to gnaw away at my mental health and spiritual wellbeing. It simply isn't what I signed up for.
We realize you’re likely on this list to get away from this app. However, sometimes it's unavoidable. Whenever Facebook rolls out a new feature, the official app will have it long before the third party Facebook apps. Facebook’s official suite of apps include Facebook Messenger, Facebook Groups, Facebook at Work, and Facebook Mentions (if you’re famous). They aren’t great for battery life, but they’ll always get the new features first. Facebook Messenger is also notoriously hard to use outside of the official app. Consequently, Facebook also makes Facebook Lite. It's a super light, simple, and surprisingly good alternative to its larger, battery swilling sibling.
Musical.ly isn’t for adults, at least that’s what the main media would tell you. The platform targets 13-18 years old, although there has been a consistent debate if an app like Musical.ly is appropriate for that age group or not. However, Musical.ly, despite its target age group, provides a very functional social media platform. It has its own powerful artistic expression, which is both unique and sticky viral in nature.
As another safety net, Edmodo also lets parents join the network. Doing so differentiates it from cyberbullying-ridden apps such as After School 5 Reasons Your Kids Shouldn't Use the After School App 5 Reasons Your Kids Shouldn't Use the After School App Plenty of children use the After School app, but there are some solid reasons why parents should steer their kids clear of it. Read More . By joining, parents can engage in the learning process and coordinate their efforts with teachers and professors.
The two main ones I see are Micro.blog and Mastodon. Micro.blog is the more popular one right now, it seems, but Mastodon has its fair share of loyal fans. I personally have accounts with both other services, but I don’t really use them reliably. Mastodon because I can’t find anyone on there, and Micro.blog because I don’t like any of the iOS apps available for it.
MeWe’s Alexa ranking is lower than Steemit’s, coming in at 28,506 globally and 7,300 in the U.S. But it’s definitely growing in interest. David Westreich from MeWe shared some interesting statistics about the site with Heavy. MeWe currently has more than 70,000 groups, and it’s available on iOS, Android, and Desktop in eight languages. MeWe is currently the number 6 trending app in the Google Play Store. Its global appeal is seen in that it ranked number one as the most downloaded app in Saudi Arabia last month.
‘Mastodon isn’t one place and one set of rules,’ it states in their official website. It is unique as it can be used as individual instances, which are specialized versions of the platform themed by the topics of user’s interests. However, you’d need your own server for running your social media platform—whose method is widely available on the internet. Businesses and advertisers can take advantage of this and create their own social media platform on their own infrastructure. And since it is your own social media, you make your own rules.
Why not have a standalone chat feature that integrates well with slack? Not sure how do-able that would be but it would be cool if you could send slack messages right from the Clickup chat session and vise versa -- sort of have them synconized. That way non-slack users still have built in chat and slack users can continue to use slack but the relevant message stream would be viewable from within the clickup chat feature. Not sure if it's possible ... maybe I'm dreaming ...
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