While there isn't a true Facebook alternative out there, you're not really looking for that anyway. You're ready for something different—a social network platform where everybody knows your name and you won't get trolled for posting. The following social media apps promise features such as less ad targeting, less fake news, and more security, so users can share updates, read the headlines, and communicate with more confidence in their security and privacy.

Named one of LinkedIn’s Top Voices in Technology, Shelly Palmer is CEO of The Palmer Group, a strategy, design and engineering firm focused at the nexus of technology, media and marketing. He is Fox 5 New York's on-air tech and digital media expert, writes a weekly column for AdAge, and is a regular commentator on CNBC and CNN. Follow @shellypalmer or visit shellypalmer.com or subscribe to our daily email http://ow.ly/WsHcb
Trolls, haters, racists... are on every social network. Gab also have racists. Mastodon blocks nazis and allows you to create your own social network. The best alternatives to social media are web hosting sites, blogs, file uploading and file mirroring websites and link bookmarking websites. They don't store too much personal data and there is no trolls, spammers and haters.
And when you make the final switch, consider deactivating your Facebook account. Remember, deactivating Facebook is different from deleting it What Deactivating or Deleting Facebook Really Means for Privacy What Deactivating or Deleting Facebook Really Means for Privacy Thinking about quitting Facebook? Here's how deleting or deactivating Facebook can improve your online privacy. Read More .
The biggest problem with Plurk is its lack of growth. The service still lacks some quality of life features and makes it difficult to do things like search and manage multiple conversations. This means that Plurk is widely used by long-time users. Since many of those long-time users are based in Taiwan and Asia, you might feel like a stranger in a strange land.
It also has a desktop version, allowing you to sync messages between your computer and phone, just like on Messenger. Signal can import your contacts, so it's easy to start a thread with anyone you already have saved in your phone. Signal also has several additional security features that might come in handy if you're aiming to avoid surveillance, like the ability to set messages to delete after a certain amount of time. You can also use Signal to make voice and video calls, just like on Messenger. There are absolutely no advertisements, and the app does not collect your personal information.
Instagram may be the alpha and omega of photographic social networks, but it’s not without its discontents. “I have an inherent distrust of Facebook,” says photographer Greg Williams. “I don’t feel like any of it is serving the user, we’re serving them and they’re selling us out to advertisers.” It’s a sentiment echoed by photographers like Erin Marie Miller and...
Realistically, Facebook has the advantage of scale – everyone is on it, and it’s not going to be easy to get enough people to switch over to a new network to make it a viable alternative. Networks that focus on niche communities may have better luck, but for average users, the best option is probably to pick a network that appeals to you, join up, explore, and cross-post with your regular social media. Like it or not, Facebook and Twitter are dominant, and any serious competitor is going to have to integrate with them to at least some degree to make switching a softer move for the users.
Last year, after Twitter began moving away from a purely chronological feed, Rochko began building the back end for what would become Mastodon. Instead of building a unified service, Rochko envisioned something more like email, or RSS: a distributed system that lets you send public messages to anyone who follows you on the service. Anyone can create a server and host their own instance of Mastodon, and Mastodon works in the background to connect them. (source)
The app supports 14 different filters, 15 photo borders, and operates a social stream much like Twitter where you can @-reply other users and follow # hashtags to see photos of specific places, topics, or events. You even get the missing-from-Instagram tilt-shift option for your shots, in rectangular, elliptical, circular, and parallel varieties. Finally, you can also edit your photos—crop them, rotate them, edit the contrast or color balance, whatever you choose. It's also available for both Android and IOS, and with the number of features it's packed with, it's surprising it's not more popular than Instagram.
All of this stuff was total catnip for me. After all, what Twitter does isn't that impressive. If anything, Twitter's made its elegant platform significantly worse over the last few years, changing the "favorite" icon, introducing a higher character count, pushing obnoxious "suggestions," and messing up the chronological timeline in favor of an algorithmically-generated one. And then there’s the user-hostile API changes that might spell doom for third-party Twitter clients. It's no wonder that even loyal users are fed up.
Instagram has nothing on Pixlr-o-matic when it comes to the number of effects, overlays, filters, and frames the app has to offer. Snap a photo within the app or choose from one already in your gallery. Pixlr-o-matic has more than two million possible outcomes, when you do permutations for all the filters, lighting effects, and borders options. And of course, you can share your photos to other sites and services, such as Facebook, imm.io, Dropbox, and Flickr.
Fire up the app, and when you tap to take a picture, you're shunted to your phone's default camera app to take your photo. Snap it, and you're returned to Flickr to edit it. Best of all, Flickr gives you ultimate control over the licensing of your photos. You can make them public or private, license them yourself via Getty, make them remix-friendly via Creative Commons, or keep them locked down, all rights reserved to you. And contrary to previous reports, Flickr is still a buzzing social network with thousands of users and thousands more photos.
Pixlr Express Plus is made by the same graphics company that makes Pixlr-o-matic (Autodesk), but this app is much more powerful than the o-matic one. Pixlr Express Plus app contains features for adjusting lighting, removing red eye, balancing color—much more than the canned filters, simple border additions, and sharing features that are key to its sister app. It's a great app if you're already feeling held back by other photo apps.
Tweetlist offers an excellent way to view lists and quickly switch between them. The Tweetlists tab is quick to access and you simply swipe left and right to view different lists. This client is very snappy and has excellent Voice Over accessibility support. Tweetlists also offers support for Twitlonger, Instapaper, and Read it Later. Another fantastic feature of Tweetlist is that conversations open automatically - if a tweet is part of a conversation, the entire conversation will be displayed upon tapping on the tweet.
If all that has you thinking about deleting Facebook entirely, you're far from alone. (Quitting the social network is also somewhat of a first-world privilege, since for many people Facebook functions as the entire internet itself.) But going cold turkey can be hard; Facebook actually provides useful services sometimes, and there's no one-for-one replacement.
Pixlr Express Plus is made by the same graphics company that makes Pixlr-o-matic (Autodesk), but this app is much more powerful than the o-matic one. Pixlr Express Plus app contains features for adjusting lighting, removing red eye, balancing color—much more than the canned filters, simple border additions, and sharing features that are key to its sister app. It's a great app if you're already feeling held back by other photo apps.
It's full of inspiration, it's clean and it's wonderfully simple to use. If you are looking for a unique way of to publish a collection of images and give them an editorial feel very quickly, Steller is the place to be. Steller has also been slow in building an active following, but much like SW/NG, I hope that the developers persist as there is certainly enough room in the market for well thought out image sharing apps like Steller.
A lot of people who've fled Facebook have made Instagram their new home—and they haven't let the fact that Facebook has owned the service since 2012 stop them. Instagram is best known as place to post photos of meals, sunsets, travel, and pets. Many also post selfies that are so carefully edited that they're unrecognizable. Others post videos or Snapchat-like stories that showcase 24 hours worth of photos and video that disappear at the end of the day. Like Twitter, it's fun to follow celebrities on Instagram—and through their photos see how the other half lives. On Instagram you can post publicly, share Stories with specific friends, or post privately.
We realize you’re likely on this list to get away from this app. However, sometimes it's unavoidable. Whenever Facebook rolls out a new feature, the official app will have it long before the third party Facebook apps. Facebook’s official suite of apps include Facebook Messenger, Facebook Groups, Facebook at Work, and Facebook Mentions (if you’re famous). They aren’t great for battery life, but they’ll always get the new features first. Facebook Messenger is also notoriously hard to use outside of the official app. Consequently, Facebook also makes Facebook Lite. It's a super light, simple, and surprisingly good alternative to its larger, battery swilling sibling.
This idea is antithetical to current consumer marketing ethos, which strives to reach targeted audiences at scale. If you want targeting at scale, you go to Facebook or Google. Either can give you practically everyone in America who fits your target. To be fair, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest can all serve up pretty big targeted audiences.
I will be 77 years old in a few weeks and the last 5 years I had built a network of friends and family of course, like everyone else, posted family pictures for posterity… anyway, was locked out due to a technicality and was so very lonely after 3 months I started a new account – my frieds were excited to reconnect and I felt like a kid in a candy store. 5 Days later am locked out again and bereft.
While a free speech focused service might not seem unreasonable, it hasn’t worked out well for Gab so far. Its mobile app was banned in 2016 from the Apple App Store due to adult content. In 2017, meanwhile, Google removed the app from the Play Store for violating its hate speech policy, noting that Gab failed to “demonstrate a sufficient level of moderation, including for content that encourages violence and advocates hate against groups of people.”
The Nextdoor mobile app for Android and iOS is a great way for people to keep up with the Joneses, the Kardashians, or anyone else in your neighborhood. Whether you want to make friends with your neighbors; are looking to easily sell your stuff; want to hire a babysitter, house sitter, or dog walker; or get informed about yard sales, what you need may be as close as a neighbor a few doors away. Nextdoor has also become a popular place for posts that alert users to nearby criminal activity and for sharing critical info during an earthquake or flood, for example.
The biggest problem with Plurk is its lack of growth. The service still lacks some quality of life features and makes it difficult to do things like search and manage multiple conversations. This means that Plurk is widely used by long-time users. Since many of those long-time users are based in Taiwan and Asia, you might feel like a stranger in a strange land.
This idea is antithetical to current consumer marketing ethos, which strives to reach targeted audiences at scale. If you want targeting at scale, you go to Facebook or Google. Either can give you practically everyone in America who fits your target. To be fair, Twitter, LinkedIn, Instagram, and Pinterest can all serve up pretty big targeted audiences.
Ich habe eine Frage zum global chat. Bisher war es immer so, dass man durch Enter das Textfenster für den Global chat öffnet. Jetzt wird dadurch allerdings das Fenster für den local geöffnet. In den Settings steht, dass die Taste für den Local entweder Einfügen (insert) oder / ist. Auch diese Tasten rufen bei mir das Textfeld für den local auf. Nur gibt es jetzt für mich halt keine Taste mehr für den Global. In den settings kann man auch gar keine Taste für den Global belegen.
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