I’d be remiss to not mention Slack or Discord here as well. Those services are good, but they are too insular to be a real threat to Twitter. You have to know someone on the inside to get in yourself, and there are so many versions/channels/servers for you to join it’s hard to keep them all straight. They can be good for you and a couple dozen (hundred) of friends to stay in touch, but it’s not great for a Twitter-style experience.
Snapchat is a brilliant alternative to Instagram. This is a multimedia messaging app for iPhone and Android users. You can share your photos from here easily. In this app, you can set the time of your chat visibility. Aside from that, what separates Snapchat from the rest is that all photos and videos being shared will disappear in a few seconds after being viewed. When it comes to capturing photos, this app has a variety of filters that you can use to make your capturing experience more fun and enjoyable.
The problem is that Twitter does not preserve your privacy when you Tweet. Firstly, all your connections, who you follow and what you like or retweet is used as a way of profiling you. Secondly, all information about you can be subpoenad very easily. Twister is an alternative that does preserve your privacy and distributes info in a way that isn't centralized for one person/company to give away to others. JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 1 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree
And if all else fails, there is always the option to revisit old social haunts. Myspace still exists, albeit as a mish-mash of pop-culture news and dormant profiles of friends who have not logged in since its relaunch in 2012. However, the fact that the opportunity to mine user data for advertisers was one of the reasons cited by media giant Time Inc when it bought Myspace in 2016, perhaps it is best not to rush to revive your Top Friends list just yet.
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Another worry with deleting Facebook is that without it, you won't be able to remember anyone's birthday. Luckily, there's a way to export your friends' birthdays directly from Facebook before you delete your account. First, log into the social network, then click Events on the left-hand side. Toward the bottom, there's an option to add events to your calendar of choice, like Microsoft Outlook, Google Calendar, or Apple Calendar. There, tap "Learn More." You'll be led to a full set of instructions for how to export all your friends' birthdays.

The Nextdoor mobile app for Android and iOS is a great way for people to keep up with the Joneses, the Kardashians, or anyone else in your neighborhood. Whether you want to make friends with your neighbors; are looking to easily sell your stuff; want to hire a babysitter, house sitter, or dog walker; or get informed about yard sales, what you need may be as close as a neighbor a few doors away. Nextdoor has also become a popular place for posts that alert users to nearby criminal activity and for sharing critical info during an earthquake or flood, for example.


I'll come right out and say it: I'm not a big fan of Instagram. And no, it's not because iOS users have had their underpants in a wad over the Android release, but because for me, it really doesn't live up to the hype. (Their new privacy-invading terms of service makes them pretty unappealing, too). Here's why, and more importantly, here are some just-as-good alternatives for Android users (and some for iOS users too!) who want to take and share photos with or without those filters that make a 5-megapixel cell phone camera look like a 70s Polaroid.

All of this stuff was total catnip for me. After all, what Twitter does isn't that impressive. If anything, Twitter's made its elegant platform significantly worse over the last few years, changing the "favorite" icon, introducing a higher character count, pushing obnoxious "suggestions," and messing up the chronological timeline in favor of an algorithmically-generated one. And then there’s the user-hostile API changes that might spell doom for third-party Twitter clients. It's no wonder that even loyal users are fed up.


A lot of people who've fled Facebook have made Instagram their new home—and they haven't let the fact that Facebook has owned the service since 2012 stop them. Instagram is best known as place to post photos of meals, sunsets, travel, and pets. Many also post selfies that are so carefully edited that they're unrecognizable. Others post videos or Snapchat-like stories that showcase 24 hours worth of photos and video that disappear at the end of the day. Like Twitter, it's fun to follow celebrities on Instagram—and through their photos see how the other half lives. On Instagram you can post publicly, share Stories with specific friends, or post privately.
Here is one more social networking application for you all that assists in mobile based instant messaging. Snapchat is growing at faster pace these days and standout like a big competitor against Facebook and Instagram etc. Using this mobile application, you can easily share media content with your friends over network. And it gets disappeared within few seconds when your friend has gone through it. Many people love to use this application due to additional advantage of chat disappearing feature as it keeps their conversations secret. If you are not familiar with Snapchat then it is right time to get it downloaded on your portable device and start enjoying. You can also find many tutorials online that provide step by step guidelines about how to get started with Snapchat.

For my money, at least, I'd much rather you focus on solving the other ten zillion things than go up against Slack. You'll have a hard time displacing Slack for us, and I'm confident nearly everyone we work with would say the same. Even if we liked CU's chat, we'd still have Slack open for the other 15 teams I chat with, so we'd end up going right back to it, methinks…
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