Friendly for Facebook is one of the newer Facebook apps. It has a pretty decent set of features as well. That includes theming, Facebook Messenger support, the ability to customize your news feed, and more. You can also download videos from Facebook. The News Feed customization allows you to filter out things like keywords. That's a great way to get rid of nonsense you don't want to see. This is definitely among the best third party Facebook apps. The pro version unlocks some of the feature and goes for $1.99.
When someone runs their own instance of Mastodon or Diaspora, it becomes like their own clubhouse, where they can set their own themes for the group and rules. Though most of these spaces are very open for anyone to join, these decentralized social networks often center around a similar identity, interest, or cause specifically to filter their membership to like-minded folks.
I found it confusing to use (maybe you need to be more techy?) and was put off by the fact that I needed to log in via Twitter. Perhaps this is just so you can connect with the same people. It’s always worthwhile to look at your options. Mastodon was started by Eugen Rochko, who was fed up with the changes that Twitter was making that closely resembled the Facebook algorithms.

There are no ads, and the service promises "no data mining. Ever." That means it won't try to sell you stuff based on your interests and habits, as revealed through your posts. Of course, Facebook started out without ads and "data mining," and it's now one of the top internet advertising companies. Facebook bought Instagram in 2012 and started showing ads there the following year.


That said, it's good at what it does, the product is sound, it's the aura around it that's misplaced. That and the fact that it's been dangled in front of Android users for far too long only to culminate in an arguably unfinished version (no tilt-shift? really?) when it was teased as "in some ways, it's better than our iOS app," according to one of the app's founders. Combine the aura that and the fact that so many iOS users don't want you playing in their sandbox anyway and it's worth looking at some alternatives.
The platform primarily targets the youngsters, the majority of which are between 18-34 years of age. Snapchat features an explore section where users can access viral and premium content on the platform. Snapchat features video status update, which apparently Instagram and Whatsapp copied on their platforms. The videos are limited to 10 seconds which is fairly short, but you can tag more videos to complete the message if you require more time. The videos and photos only stay on the platform for 24 hours, and automatically gets deleted past the time. There is also no way to share someone else’s videos or photos, unlike Twitter which easily allows the option to retweet. Getting a Snapshot and sharing is only the way out.
Plurk features a horizontal timeline and it lets you share pictures, videos or URLs for web-based articles. The platform stimulates its users to spend more time engaging with other Plurk members through the concept of Karma, which grants you access to more emoticons. This social network can be accessed from iPhones, Android devices or from PC or Mac computers.
If you’re not interested in manually editing your images, you can quickly improve your shots with the preset filters designed specifically for portraits, landscapes, nightlife, food and sunsets. You can also mix and match to get a custom-made look for your photographs. As well as being able to share to all the usual social media platforms, you can also link back to Instagram.
The two main ones I see are Micro.blog and Mastodon. Micro.blog is the more popular one right now, it seems, but Mastodon has its fair share of loyal fans. I personally have accounts with both other services, but I don’t really use them reliably. Mastodon because I can’t find anyone on there, and Micro.blog because I don’t like any of the iOS apps available for it.
The Nextdoor mobile app for Android and iOS is a great way for people to keep up with the Joneses, the Kardashians, or anyone else in your neighborhood. Whether you want to make friends with your neighbors; are looking to easily sell your stuff; want to hire a babysitter, house sitter, or dog walker; or get informed about yard sales, what you need may be as close as a neighbor a few doors away. Nextdoor has also become a popular place for posts that alert users to nearby criminal activity and for sharing critical info during an earthquake or flood, for example.
Today's Twitter calls to mind the plot of Ghostbusters 2: It's a digital sewer of negativity slime we're all wading through. With the company's fortunes tied directly to user count, there's little incentive to purge bad actors or even those who break Twitter's own rules, especially if they're famous enough. In this case, I did what the Ghostbusters might do—I broke with the establishment and took things into my own hands. I (mostly) left Twitter, and joined Mastodon.
Available as a mobile app (you can run Android apps on a PC How to Emulate Android and Run Android Apps on Your PC How to Emulate Android and Run Android Apps on Your PC It's actually pretty easy to get Android apps running on your desktop or laptop! Here, we step you through the best methods. Read More ), Amino can be installed on Google Play and the Apple App Store. Its focus is similar to Mastodon: you’re given communities to join based on your interests.
While there isn't a true Facebook alternative out there, you're not really looking for that anyway. You're ready for something different—a social network platform where everybody knows your name and you won't get trolled for posting. The following social media apps promise features such as less ad targeting, less fake news, and more security, so users can share updates, read the headlines, and communicate with more confidence in their security and privacy.
While there isn't a true Facebook alternative out there, you're not really looking for that anyway. You're ready for something different—a social network platform where everybody knows your name and you won't get trolled for posting. The following social media apps promise features such as less ad targeting, less fake news, and more security, so users can share updates, read the headlines, and communicate with more confidence in their security and privacy.
The recent purge and exodus from Facebook was timed quite well, considering Steemit’s recent changes that make it faster for people to join the network. David Jefferys, Business Development Manager for Steemit, said about the timing: “Steemit is open for business and the timing couldn’t be more perfect with the fragmentation and disenfranchisement pervading the major social media networks.” 
In 2016 Apple banned gab’s mobile app on its Appstore for promoting explicit adult content. This was followed by Play Store in 2017, which banned the app for violating hate speech guidelines of Google. Google further noted during its ban that the platform failed in demonstrating a minimum required level of moderation and encouraged violence. Despite all this, Gab still shelters people who are easy on hate speech and non-art nudity. That said, you’ll have to search for things that could offend you on Gab dedicatedly, or else, it is chiefly stuffed with pop culture art, memes, and fair discussions on a variety of topics. And even if you find something that’s offensive to you, like a discussion on online anonymity, you can use the scroll button and explore some memes on Trump.
We would much rather prefer to use specialized tools (Google Hangouts Chat, Microsoft Teams, Slack, Atlassian Stride) that focus on being a communication hub and integrate with all the other software we use like erp, crm etc. So a focus on integrating existing tools would be very much preferred. And if you really would like to built a chat platform like e.g. Asana with the chance of being subpar, then please make it optional with the possibility to toggle it off.
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