It's very much like Twitter with a character limit of 500, except there's not *one* website you have to trust, but you can choose the mastodon server ("instance") that you trust and they are linked, so you can follow people from other instances. The instances all have their own rules, so you can pick a place with as few or many rules as you are comfortable with. mrmbl • May 2017 • 12 agrees and 5 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Minds looks very similar to Facebook in some ways. Each user has a profile page with a header and a profile photo. You can add stories, images, or status updates just like on Facebook, and users can leave comments, share your posts, or vote them up or down. There’s also a newsfeed, where you can see what other people you’re following have posted. You can also create your own blog or group. However, Minds is different in other ways. As one Minds user, OWNtheNWO, pointed out to me on Minds, “liking” a comment or post doesn’t weigh it in importance like it does on Facebook — they still remain strictly in chronological order. Minds also has a blog system similar to Blogspot, in which you can paywall your content. And you can exchange your Minds tokens on the Etherium blockchain for ETH, and then exchange those into whatever you wish, but the tokens aren’t worth a lot yet.
While a free speech focused service might not seem unreasonable, it hasn’t worked out well for Gab so far. Its mobile app was banned in 2016 from the Apple App Store due to adult content. In 2017, meanwhile, Google removed the app from the Play Store for violating its hate speech policy, noting that Gab failed to “demonstrate a sufficient level of moderation, including for content that encourages violence and advocates hate against groups of people.”
If all that has you thinking about deleting Facebook entirely, you're far from alone. (Quitting the social network is also somewhat of a first-world privilege, since for many people Facebook functions as the entire internet itself.) But going cold turkey can be hard; Facebook actually provides useful services sometimes, and there's no one-for-one replacement.
Gab.ai is a platform that is similar to Twitter. You have 300 characters with which to make your point. It has been called the Alt-Right’s social media alternative and although Gab itself doesn’t censor its users, Microsoft has threatened to take them down due to “hate speech.” A lot of folks who got banned, shadowbanned, or censored by Twitter are there.
Musical.ly isn’t for adults, at least that’s what the main media would tell you. The platform targets 13-18 years old, although there has been a consistent debate if an app like Musical.ly is appropriate for that age group or not. However, Musical.ly, despite its target age group, provides a very functional social media platform. It has its own powerful artistic expression, which is both unique and sticky viral in nature.

Mini for Facebook is yet another solid option, it allows you to theme to your preference, while a pitch black theme for OLED displays is also available in settings. There are over 40 added features compared to the official Facebook application, and real-time push notifications are enabled in this application. If you want to download videos from Facebook, that’s not a problem either, as this app allows it. Mini for Facebook is free, but it comes with ads.


Kristijan has been writing for Android Headlines since 2014 and is an editor for the site. He has worked as a writer for several outlets before joining Android Headlines, and has a background in writing about Android and technology in general. He is a smartphone enthusiast that specializes in Android applications, and that platform in general. Contact him at Kristijan. [email protected]

I'm going to end this piece by stating that I love Instagram. It is where all my clients are on a daily basis, I get to engage with new audiences, connect with new creatives, and often scroll till my thumb gets numb. But Instagram is also a victim of it's own success. The bombardment of bots (which will hopefully slow down) that auto-comment, limited search engine, and increase in sponsored posts is spoiling the broth. I've given five alternatives above that each bring something different to the party, and may create new avenues of interest and creative expression to pursue in this digital, mobile age. Please share any of your own alternatives below.
Unlike Twitter, Tumblr does not really have any hard restrictions on the users, apart from some policies preventing self-harm and suicide. A platform is an excellent place for businesses and advertisers for its visual nature. It supports photos, GIFs, Videos, audios, chats, quotes, links and everything that you can create with them as long as you do not violate its guidelines. Tumblr also provides needful tools to create interactive content that you can use for online promotion of a brand. It also features an integration with Google Analytics to track your posts’ performance.
What about Ello or Diaspora? I have been getting kicked completely out of Facebook and I have had to delete my app several times. And I know that I have let my friends on Facebook know that I was looking for something outside of Facebook. My Aunt as well as a few others are looking too. But I told them as soon as I find something I would let them know. I don’t think I should be discriminated against for being conservative and this to is happening on Facebook as well.
Now to Steemit. They claim to prevent spammers from posting excessively they limit your posts. Want to upload and share some photos or maybe use the connected DTube ,YouTube alternative, to upload a video go right ahead. You will quickly be silenced and forbidden from posting any further unless you are willing to pay. If you become popular this will go away some due to the fact that you will get more people liking your content and it will give you more “steem power” so much like high school if you are popular you can share your opinion, but if you are not be prepared to pay if you want to comment on that post. This along with the fact that 80-90% of the content is about crypto currency and people talking about Whales while telling minnows to shut up and a two week wait to even set up your account bored me very quickly. It is a horrible platform for anyone other then those who want to eat, think, dream, and talk about crypto 24/7 and who are willing to wait ages to be popular enough to talk about it freely.

I'll come right out and say it: I'm not a big fan of Instagram. And no, it's not because iOS users have had their underpants in a wad over the Android release, but because for me, it really doesn't live up to the hype. (Their new privacy-invading terms of service makes them pretty unappealing, too). Here's why, and more importantly, here are some just-as-good alternatives for Android users (and some for iOS users too!) who want to take and share photos with or without those filters that make a 5-megapixel cell phone camera look like a 70s Polaroid.
Facebook hasn't been very fun for the last few years. From political fighting to fake news to privacy concerns, many users are logging on less and others are deleting their accounts altogether. For those who primarily use Facebook today but are looking for alternatives, we've put together a list of the best options—from the most popular challengers to a few of the latest upstarts.

IMDB is the go-to website for movie lovers and deservedly so. It’s a great website where you can read reviews of a movie from various users and rate movies you’ve just watched. Along with that, you can also discuss various movies on the “Message Board” with the very cool community. There’s also IMDBPro, if you want to get in touch with an actor or artist.

BuddyPress can be a Facebook alternative, depending on your needs. It's a Wordpress add-on, which means if you self-host or have hosted for you a Wordpress blog or website, you can add BP to enable you to create a social network of your own. Do it on your server and keep your privacy! JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 4 agrees and 2 disagrees Disagree   Agree
500px has long been popular with the photography community with it's clean approach to photo sharing. No hashtags muddle this pond, 500px is all about sharing great work. Curated collections are excellent and regularly updated, whilst the Exif data upload is a nice touch to delve into the technical workings in-camera (Flickr also has this function). There are plenty of similarities with Flickr in terms of it being a platform angled towards promotion of the best creative work rather than popular accounts and sponsored posts.
App.Net was, I think, the closest we’ve come to a good Twitter alternative, and it came out back in 2012. It did basically everything Twitter did, but nicer. It had a decent web experience and a great selection of third party apps up and running within weeks of launch. And while it was a paid service (and maybe therefore doomed from the start), tons of people in the tech community went there and were having lively discussions. My App.Net feed was a joy to browse, and most of my Twitter friends were there. Oh yeah, and it was an app platform that let some devs build off their back end in interesting ways.

Hivebrite offers all the tools you need to build, manage, and engage a community. Customize how your interface looks, how users sign up, the information they can display on their profiles, how much access they receive, and which features (i.e., events, forums, messaging, or job board) you enable. Hivebrite offers solutions for education, professional networks, nonprofits, and more. Like Ning, the level of customization that Hivebrite offers is immense and may appear overwhelming at first.


Facebook hasn't been very fun for the last few years. From political fighting to fake news to privacy concerns, many users are logging on less and others are deleting their accounts altogether. For those who primarily use Facebook today but are looking for alternatives, we've put together a list of the best options—from the most popular challengers to a few of the latest upstarts.

I don’t expect to move over to either of these as my main social network, but Twitter’s latest waves of jack-assery has kickstarted the conversation again. There are a few problems with these other services, but the main thing is that they just haven’t managed to get enough people to stick around and use them for long. People tend to try them and bounce off them pretty quickly. I know I have bounced off each of them numerous times.
The terms and conditions are not worth the pixels or electrons that make up that agreement. Each and every agreement in the world contains the phrase "The provider of the service reserves the right to change the terms of this agreement at any time without prior notification". If the owner of the site where you store your images decides to block your access to those images or to the site, what are you going to do?
More and more people are wanting to leave Facebook, especially after Facebook recently deleted (or “unpublished”) more than 800 pages. On Thursday, Facebook acknowledged that it purged more than 800 Facebook accounts. They said the pages were focused on politically oriented content that violated Facebook’s spam policies. Facebook said in a blog post that it was deleting 559 pages and 251 accounts “that have consistently broken our rules against spam and coordinated inauthentic behavior.” But the problem is that many owners of those pages don’t understand why they were deleted. Some pages focused on police brutality were removed. Other deleted pages, like Anti-Media, were alternative or independent news sources. And some were pages belonging to individuals who reported on the news, like Press for Truth. It’s unclear if any of these pages will be able to get their accounts back, but many account owners have publicly said they’re not sure why they were deleted. Some lost their Twitter accounts nearly simultaneously.

In 2016, Facebook introduced Marketplace, a feature allowing users to buy and sell items from people in their communities. As a replacement, consider Nextdoor, an app designed to keep you in the loop about what's happening in your neighborhood. It has a free and for sale section that, like Marketplace, emphasizes local offerings, and feels less sketchy than Craigslist.
Now that Mark Zuckerberg controls your hipster, vintage-inspired photos that you took with Instagram, you might be feeling weighed down with the fear that your favorite photography app will see some major changes. I cried for a few minutes, then I realized that I never used Instagram to edit photos because its filters were actually very limited and pretty crappy. There’s tons of better apps out there. If for whatever reason you’re scared to stick with the new Instagram controlled by Facebook, there are plenty of alternatives to Instagram… and in many ways most of them are better. Take a look at these five awesome Instagram alternatives.

Now that Mark Zuckerberg controls your hipster, vintage-inspired photos that you took with Instagram, you might be feeling weighed down with the fear that your favorite photography app will see some major changes. I cried for a few minutes, then I realized that I never used Instagram to edit photos because its filters were actually very limited and pretty crappy. There’s tons of better apps out there. If for whatever reason you’re scared to stick with the new Instagram controlled by Facebook, there are plenty of alternatives to Instagram… and in many ways most of them are better. Take a look at these five awesome Instagram alternatives.
Instagram may be the alpha and omega of photographic social networks, but it’s not without its discontents. “I have an inherent distrust of Facebook,” says photographer Greg Williams. “I don’t feel like any of it is serving the user, we’re serving them and they’re selling us out to advertisers.” It’s a sentiment echoed by photographers like Erin Marie Miller and...
With Google’s messaging apps a real mess right now (Hangouts is good but rarely used), and Facebook in charge of Instagram and WhatsApp, the other genuine alternatives are Signal and Telegram. We prefer the former for its stronger encryption, but they both do messages, calls, media, groups, and more. Whichever you pick though, you’ve then got the job of trying to get all your friends to switch too.
We would much rather prefer to use specialized tools (Google Hangouts Chat, Microsoft Teams, Slack, Atlassian Stride) that focus on being a communication hub and integrate with all the other software we use like erp, crm etc. So a focus on integrating existing tools would be very much preferred. And if you really would like to built a chat platform like e.g. Asana with the chance of being subpar, then please make it optional with the possibility to toggle it off.
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