One word of warning: Many dating apps require Facebook integration to work, meaning you won't be able to use them if you delete your account. You can still create a Tinder account without Facebook, but you will loose all your current matches and conversations. Hinge and Bumble require you to have a Facebook account to sign up, though the latter company says it's working on dropping that requirement.
Instagram was launched back in 2010 to accommodate the photo sharing maniacs on the internet. It has set the trend to share beautiful personal and professional photos on the internet and build a following around it. What launched as a simple application to attach relatively low-resolution images has today become the platform of choice for capitalizing, branding and advertising by optimizing photo posts.

Fella for Facebook is one of the most customizable replacements for the official Facebook application. You can choose between a number of colorful themes in this application, though this is a paid app, it’s currently on sale for $1, but it usually costs about $1.50. This app uses way less data than the regular Facebook app, which applies for pretty much all apps here, while you can also download videos from Facebook using this app, not to mention that it is available in over 35 languages.


I'm going to end this piece by stating that I love Instagram. It is where all my clients are on a daily basis, I get to engage with new audiences, connect with new creatives, and often scroll till my thumb gets numb. But Instagram is also a victim of it's own success. The bombardment of bots (which will hopefully slow down) that auto-comment, limited search engine, and increase in sponsored posts is spoiling the broth. I've given five alternatives above that each bring something different to the party, and may create new avenues of interest and creative expression to pursue in this digital, mobile age. Please share any of your own alternatives below.
Look familiar? We originally published this post shortly after Facebook's acquisition of and the Android launch of Instagram. We were concerned then about the influence Facebook would have on it, and now it's borne fruit in the form of an invasive terms-of-service agreement. The agreement gives Instagram rights to and ownership of your photos to sell and use in ads as they see fit. Sure, you probably don't care if they sell that photo of your coffee foam, but you and your friends may care if they sell photos of your faces or likenesses to a company that uses your shot in their ad material. Unfortunately, at this stage the only way to opt-out is to close your account and move to another service, like some of these great alternatives.
There’s no end-to-end encryption on either platform’s private messaging at the moment, and to be fair there isn’t for Twitter or Facebook either (though Facebook is rumored to be looking into it for their Messenger). Both Mastodon and Diaspora are built on the idea that the conversations happening are meant to be public, so the privacy emphasis is on keeping user data in user ownership and out of advertiser’s hands, not keeping conversations out of the public eye.
DeviantArt is the perfect platform for artists, who want to showcase their art galleries to the world. It has a great community of artists you can interact with and along with that you get to see some great art. There are a number of features that aim at making life easier for artists and moreover, it also makes sure the artists get their due credit.
SteamZoo has long been touted as a great—if not better-alternative to Instagram, partially because of the way it turns editing and sharing your photos into more of a social game that's addictive to play. You can earn badges—much like FourSquare—for sharing photos, adding effects and borders, or even for taking pictures of specific subjects, like your dog or your dinner. Whether you encourage the behavior or not, StreamZoo is a pretty addictive app to use.
As another safety net, Edmodo also lets parents join the network. Doing so differentiates it from cyberbullying-ridden apps such as After School 5 Reasons Your Kids Shouldn't Use the After School App 5 Reasons Your Kids Shouldn't Use the After School App Plenty of children use the After School app, but there are some solid reasons why parents should steer their kids clear of it. Read More . By joining, parents can engage in the learning process and coordinate their efforts with teachers and professors.
More and more people are wanting to leave Facebook, especially after Facebook recently deleted (or “unpublished”) more than 800 pages. On Thursday, Facebook acknowledged that it purged more than 800 Facebook accounts. They said the pages were focused on politically oriented content that violated Facebook’s spam policies. Facebook said in a blog post that it was deleting 559 pages and 251 accounts “that have consistently broken our rules against spam and coordinated inauthentic behavior.” But the problem is that many owners of those pages don’t understand why they were deleted. Some pages focused on police brutality were removed. Other deleted pages, like Anti-Media, were alternative or independent news sources. And some were pages belonging to individuals who reported on the news, like Press for Truth. It’s unclear if any of these pages will be able to get their accounts back, but many account owners have publicly said they’re not sure why they were deleted. Some lost their Twitter accounts nearly simultaneously.
Pickup for the app has been slow, and I'm sure this is disappointing for Polaroid, but I implore them to continue to update the app and promote this alternative take on social media. One obvious improvement would be the ability to upload Apple Live Photos to the service rather than only being able to use the in-app camera, thus limiting what you can upload to the present moment.
Those who are more addicted to capturing photographs of all routine life moments and love to update them on social media sites are advised to move towards Instagram. It is easier to use and the interactive design make it standout as a popular competitor against Facebook. Currently, about 400 million active users get connected to this site per month and the average user count is becoming more and more.
It doesn't bother with a social network on the back-end (and honestly, why bother if your friends are all on Twitter or Facebook and you're going to send the photo there anyway) which we can't fault them for. The real focus of Pixlr-O-Matic is the filters, the borders, the tweaks, and all of the changes you can make to your photos. In the end, you get over 2 million different permutations and options to make your photos look just right (or all wrong, depending) before you save the finished product to your camera roll or gallery and then share it with your friends.
If you're looking for a photo editing app that lets you do more than dress up your images, something that really lets you fine-tune them, Snapseed is the ticket. Snapseed is PCMag's Editors' Choice for iPhone camera apps. We love its non-destructive editing capabilities, powerful photo correction, localized adjustments, and variety of image-enhancing effects.

Secondly, there are regular competitions or "Missions" with specific briefs. Prizes come in various forms such as being published in an exhibition, having your work used in commercial campaigns, or cold hard cash. This is a great way for marketing teams of commercial brands or exhibition curators to hunt for new, enthusiastic talent. This gives any aspiring photographer the feeling that the playing field has been leveled, and if the quality is there, then you wont be ignored.
There is nothing that can match Facebook right now although some people might argue Twitter is better but it’s not really an alternative and it’s certainly not aimed at people who want to be in touch with friends and families. Well, now that we have established the fact that there are no Facebook alternatives, let’s cut to the chase that we do have several other social networks that aim at specific users. For instance, there are networks aimed at photographers, designers, startups, investors etc.. Well, if you have been looking for a Facebook alternative for a specific need, we are listing down the best Facebook alternatives according to different types and categories.
I will be 77 years old in a few weeks and the last 5 years I had built a network of friends and family of course, like everyone else, posted family pictures for posterity… anyway, was locked out due to a technicality and was so very lonely after 3 months I started a new account – my frieds were excited to reconnect and I felt like a kid in a candy store. 5 Days later am locked out again and bereft.

Vero is a subscription based social network. It shows no ads and doesn’t collect data. It’s a totally different model to Facebook in the sense that Facebook needs user data in order to make money from them. Vero does collect some usage data which is used to see how often the app is used, but note that this option by default is off. Unlike Facebook where they have everything turned on and you have to go into your settings and turn them off.
All social networks are a cancer on the body of the Internet. They may be convenient, they may provide some desired services but they also provide as many undesired problems (if not more). If they are controlled or moderated, then everybody is only allowed to say the same things and have the same opinion. If they are open then they become platforms for abuse, cyberbullying, ostracism, etc. If social networks disappeared overnight, the Internet would become a much more civilized space.
Auf diese Art „twittere” ich nun schon einige Wochen wieder über beide Kanäle. Als heute bei Twitter nach dem Ausfall eine kleine Diskussion begann, ob man nicht mal wieder Identi.ca ausprobieren sollte. Das bekam eine ziemliche Dynamik und ich musste feststellen, dass fast jeder meiner regelmäßigen Twitterkontakte bereits einen Identi.ca-Account hatte – zum Teil schon sehr lange, oft aber auch lange nicht genutzt.
Simple for Facebook actually comes in two options, “Simple Free” and “Simple Pro”, both of which are linked down below. The free variant of the app comes with ads, while the paid does not, not to mention that you’re getting a number of additional options in the Pro version which costs $4. There are a number of themes available in this app, while you can also pin pages, groups, and more if you want.
Traditional e-mail is still a big part of online communication for private and for business use, with many users typically opting for Outlook as their e-mail client. For PC users, Microsoft is practically an essential, but many private users and small businesses often look for alternatives. Luckily, there is a great number of free e-mail programs available for anyone put off by Outlook’s licensing...
Hootsuite is another one of those Twitter -- and Facebook, LinkedIn, and Foursquare -- apps that seems aimed more squarely at social network and social media marketing types rather than average users, but if you have a brand to push and love you some stats, especially if you're already all in with Hootsuite on the app, the app is a great companion.

While there isn't a true Facebook alternative out there, you're not really looking for that anyway. You're ready for something different—a social network platform where everybody knows your name and you won't get trolled for posting. The following social media apps promise features such as less ad targeting, less fake news, and more security, so users can share updates, read the headlines, and communicate with more confidence in their security and privacy.


@Zach Snader I actually somewhat disagree with @Lee Fuhr. I think this would be a great feature. I like Slack, but at the same time I don't. I like it because i know how to use it, but when dealing with teams and clients (especially), some people may not understand how to use Slack. I've seen it many times with people in my circles. For example courses and memberships held within Slack. Navigating the interface was too difficult for some people and they didn't know how to reply and keep a conversation in one thread. And many people complained about it. The idea isn't to compete with Slack, but to innovate and create something that caters to those who aren't necessarily Slack's ideal users.
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