Unfortunately, while I prefer apps like EyeEm (and I'm curious to check out Steller), the real reason that Instagram works for marketing is that it's also used by people who aren't photographers. So while you might be building a decent following on flickr or 500px, it's other photographers, who probably won't be looking to hire you to shoot their campaign/wedding. If on the other hand you're looking to make a name for yourself doing workshops/training for other photographers then maybe they're a perfect place to market yourself.
Simple for Facebook keeps true to its namesake. It's a simple web-wrapper for the Facebook mobile site. It includes all of the basic features. That includes interacting with posts, uploading photo and video, and all of that. It also boasts support for Facebook Messenger. About the only other noteworthy thing about the app is the small selection of themes. Like we said, this one is really simple. The free version has ads. You can purchase the full version for $1.49 to get rid of them.
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Join Robert Holden on a 4-Day retreat with Alternatives in the beautiful Montserrat Monastery in Catalonia Spain - Spiritual Growth and the Enneagram - last few places left - 11th-14th April https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/spiritual-growth-the-enneagram-with-robert-holden-retreat-in-montserrat-monastery-2019-registration-54112401650 …pic.twitter.com/gjZHeV7puk
I'm going to end this piece by stating that I love Instagram. It is where all my clients are on a daily basis, I get to engage with new audiences, connect with new creatives, and often scroll till my thumb gets numb. But Instagram is also a victim of it's own success. The bombardment of bots (which will hopefully slow down) that auto-comment, limited search engine, and increase in sponsored posts is spoiling the broth. I've given five alternatives above that each bring something different to the party, and may create new avenues of interest and creative expression to pursue in this digital, mobile age. Please share any of your own alternatives below.

I'll come right out and say it: I'm not a big fan of Instagram. And no, it's not because iOS users have had their underpants in a wad over the Android release, but because for me, it really doesn't live up to the hype. (Their new privacy-invading terms of service makes them pretty unappealing, too). Here's why, and more importantly, here are some just-as-good alternatives for Android users (and some for iOS users too!) who want to take and share photos with or without those filters that make a 5-megapixel cell phone camera look like a 70s Polaroid.


In truth, there are entirely reasonable discussions on Gab; the distasteful stuff you would have to go looking for. If anything, it is perhaps a good argument against online anonymity. All of this controversy is a shame, as the Gab platform is really good, giving you 300 character status updates. The site feels like a combination of Facebook and Twitter, and Gabs can be automatically shared to Twitter (should you want to).

Fire up the app, and when you tap to take a picture, you're shunted to your phone's default camera app to take your photo. Snap it, and you're returned to Flickr to edit it. Best of all, Flickr gives you ultimate control over the licensing of your photos. You can make them public or private, license them yourself via Getty, make them remix-friendly via Creative Commons, or keep them locked down, all rights reserved to you. And contrary to previous reports, Flickr is still a buzzing social network with thousands of users and thousands more photos.


Vero is a subscription based social network. It shows no ads and doesn’t collect data. It’s a totally different model to Facebook in the sense that Facebook needs user data in order to make money from them. Vero does collect some usage data which is used to see how often the app is used, but note that this option by default is off. Unlike Facebook where they have everything turned on and you have to go into your settings and turn them off.
Ein paar Dinge sind in den letzten Tagen zusammengekommen, über die man sich bei Twitter ärgern kann: Zunächst hat Twitter angekündigt, die eigene CI gegen freie Entwickler durchzusetzen. Und dann bricht der Dienst nach der Einführung eines neuen Sicherheits‐​Features zusammen. Zeit sich einmal wieder an die freie Alternative zu erinnern: Das auch unter dem Namen „Identi.ca” bekannte StatusNet.
With the increasing popularity of digital media, Facebook is also becoming fun home to all social media lovers. There are so many interesting features inside this user friendly and highly interactive platform but cons are also present. At one side, millions of users stay actively connected to Facebook but on the other side, it also faces criticism. The biggest issue is privacy control options on Facebook. Anyone can check your all details while visiting your profile and they can even download your photos without taking any permission from you. Such issues are worth considerable and this is the main reason behind why people are searching for potential Facebook Alternatives. If you are already bored with Facebook App and now want to take a step ahead to more fun then choose any of these Facebook alternatives as discussed below:
This is the best photo editing app you can get on the iPhone for free. It works really well and rivals Camera+ in the features department with a number of great vintage filters that will give your photos a unique look. Extra packs of filters only cost $1. Like Snapseed, it’s available on multiple platforms so you can get the same experience no matter what device you’re on.
of the week. Bad Habits also starts with about 1,000 in TEA units, and 24,000 in album sales. The latter figure was boosted by an array of merchandise/album bundles sold via NAV’s official webstore, all of which included pre-sale access to purchase tickets to NAV’s upcoming tour. On the new Billboard 200, Bad Habits is followed by another Republic Records release, as Ariana Grande’s Thank U, Next holds at No. 2 (62,000 units; down 7 percent). Since debuting at No. 1 on the Feb. 23-dated chart seven weeks ago, Thank U, Next has yet to leave the top two positions. The last time an album managed that feat (of spending its first seven chart weeks inside the top two) happened back in 2016, when another Republic album, Drake’s chart-topping Views, spent its first 17 weeks between Nos. 1 and 2 (May 21-Sept. 10, 2016). Back on the new chart, Juice WRLD’s former leader Death Race for Love dips 1-3 in its third week (54,000 units; down 27 percent). Rapper Rich the Kid earns his second top 10 album on the Billboard 200, as The World Is Yours 2 bows at No. 4. The set launches with 42,000 units (2,000 of that sum were in album sales). The artist previously scored a No. 2-charting album when The World Is Yours opened in the runner-up slot on the April 14, 2018-dated chart. XXXTentacion’s former No. 1, ?, bolts back up the list, rising 27-5 with 40,000 units (up 132 percent). The ? album’s jump is owed to its reissue with bonus tracks, and also within a number of merchandise/album bundles, commemorating the set’s one-year anniversary. Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper’s A Star Is Born soundtrack descends 3-6 on the new Billboard 200 with 35,000 units (down 13 percent), while A Boogie Wit da Hoodie’s Hoodie SZN dips 4-7 with 32,000 units (down 4 percent). Post Malone’s beerbongs & bentleys shifts 6-8 with 31,000 units (down less than 1 percent) and Queen’s Bohemian Rhapsody soundtrack slips 5-9 with 30,000 units (down 10 percent). Closing out the new top 10 is Mötley Crüe’s soundtrack to The Dirt, bowing at No. 10 with nearly 30,000 units (of which 15,000 were in album sales). It’s the first top 10 set for the rock band in more than a decade, and the act’s ninth top 10 effort overall. The group last visited in the top 10 with their most recent studio effort, Saints of Los Angeles, which debuted and peaked at No. 4 on the July 12, 2008-dated chart. Ariana Grande rewrites her longest command of the Billboard Hot 100, as "7 Rings," her second leader on the list, rules for an eighth week. She first topped the Hot 100 for seven weeks with "Thank U, Next" beginning in November. "Rings," released on Republic Records, holds at its No. 2 high on Radio Songs, despite a 1 percent dip to 91.8 million audience impressions in the week ending March 31, according to Nielsen Music. It drops to No. 3 on the Streaming Songs chart, after eight weeks at No. 1, with 35.5 million U.S. streams, down 3 percent, in the week ending March 28. On Digital Song Sales, it rebounds 6-5, after three weeks at No. 1 (17,000 downloads sold, down 5 percent, in the week ending March 28). Post Malone sports two songs in the Hot 100's top three for the first time, as "Wow." rises to a new high, pushing 4-2, and former one-week leader "Sunflower (Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse)," with Swae Lee, keeps at No. 3. "Wow." jumps 4-2 for a new peak on Streaming Songs, up 15 percent to 35.4 million streams in the week ending March 28, its first full frame of tracking after the March 19 premiere of its new official video. It's steady at No. 2 on Digital Song Sales (23,000, down 2 percent) and holds at No. 7 on Radio Songs (67.5 million, a new weekly best, up 3 percent). "Sunflower" rebounds 2-1 for a third week atop Streaming Songs (38.7 million U.S. streams, up 7 percent) and lifts 4-3 on Digital Song Sales (21,000, up 13 percent).
In truth, there are entirely reasonable discussions on Gab; the distasteful stuff you would have to go looking for. If anything, it is perhaps a good argument against online anonymity. All of this controversy is a shame, as the Gab platform is really good, giving you 300 character status updates. The site feels like a combination of Facebook and Twitter, and Gabs can be automatically shared to Twitter (should you want to).

A truly transnational campaign. Ahead of May elections @EuroAlter will send 5 caravans to 15 countries to meet social movements, NGOs, and citizens initiatives. Another Europe is not something to aspire to. But something that already exists on the ground.https://transeuropacaravans.eu/?fbclid=IwAR1GD7vRt7N5NxrEEww87vgwdO9ugI3waHFo9klWiHb-HNcmiB6nv2P2D9s …
When someone runs their own instance of Mastodon or Diaspora, it becomes like their own clubhouse, where they can set their own themes for the group and rules. Though most of these spaces are very open for anyone to join, these decentralized social networks often center around a similar identity, interest, or cause specifically to filter their membership to like-minded folks.
It was launched recently in year 2016 but its interactive features have made it popular enough among youngsters. If you have used Muscial.ly app then Live.ly can appear like a potential competitor to that. It allows users to broadcast memorable moments from their life and people can also watch live streams at any corner of world. When you like some live streams then you can simply send “loves” to the broadcaster and update comments. It also allow users to send gift points to each other and these gift points can be bought be spending real money. You will definitely love the Daily Leaderboard feature of Live.ly that assists in easy channel shorting as per number of total “Loves” received b the broadcaster. Anyone can browse for specific categories of streams to enjoy as per mood. Live.ly also gives opportunity to initiate search for friends by using their contact numbers or usernames.

There you have it. Four great—if not better—alternatives to Instagram. I admit, I don't hate the app as much as I implied earlier, but it's difficult to watch great apps and alternatives get swept under the rug simply because of trendiness and flash rather than substance and features. Still, you may not agree with me—perhaps you've used one of these apps and still prefer Instagram, if only to make iOS users angry? Perhaps there's a killer Instagram feature I've overlooked, or a killer alternative worth mentioning? Whatever you think, agree or disagree, share your thoughts in the discussions below.
LocalLink is an application that allows people to find other people who share their interests and collaborate with them. LocalLink allows them to search for groups in their city and/or locality, join them, and communicate with them with ease. Made with AppInventor (and Fusion Tables at core), LocalLink is partially community - driven, and has several safety … See more

The aptly named Hipster borrows a lot from Instagram, including the snappy photo shooting and all of the great filters you can apply to your photos. Hipster also allows you to add text captions to your photo "postcards" before sharing them, and then post your photos to Twiter, Facebook, Flickr, or Tumblr for others to see. It's fast, easy to use, and probably the simplest to get started with in the roundup.
While a free speech focused service might not seem unreasonable, it hasn’t worked out well for Gab so far. Its mobile app was banned in 2016 from the Apple App Store due to adult content. In 2017, meanwhile, Google removed the app from the Play Store for violating its hate speech policy, noting that Gab failed to “demonstrate a sufficient level of moderation, including for content that encourages violence and advocates hate against groups of people.”
I'll come right out and say it: I'm not a big fan of Instagram. And no, it's not because iOS users have had their underpants in a wad over the Android release, but because for me, it really doesn't live up to the hype. (Their new privacy-invading terms of service makes them pretty unappealing, too). Here's why, and more importantly, here are some just-as-good alternatives for Android users (and some for iOS users too!) who want to take and share photos with or without those filters that make a 5-megapixel cell phone camera look like a 70s Polaroid.
Vero is a subscription based social network. It shows no ads and doesn’t collect data. It’s a totally different model to Facebook in the sense that Facebook needs user data in order to make money from them. Vero does collect some usage data which is used to see how often the app is used, but note that this option by default is off. Unlike Facebook where they have everything turned on and you have to go into your settings and turn them off.
No matter which Twitter alternative you use; you would see the growing influence of Musical.ly on other platforms. Muical.ly allows you to use famous audio cues from the platform to record a video performance. After you record the video, you are given plenty of filters and effects to add upon it. It then gives you an ability to share between the other social media platforms. After you publish your performance, it goes out in the public thread. This might raise an arrow or two for its lousy privacy, but Musical.ly have its privacy policy in place, fortunately. You can quickly change the privacy setting and select who can see your posts.
Last year, Mastodon made splashes as an open source Twitter competitor but you can also use it as a Facebook alternative. Apart from all the differences in terms of privacy, character length, what really sets Mastodon apart is the “instance” feature. You can think of the service as a series of connected nodes (instances) and your account belongs to a particular instance.
Vero lets you share photos and video just like Instagram, plus it lets you talk about music, movies or books you like or hate. Though Vero has been around since 2015, its popularity surged in recent days, thanks in part to sudden, word-of-mouth interest from the cosplay community — comic book fans who like to dress up as characters. That interest then spread to other online groups.
Minds looks very similar to Facebook in some ways. Each user has a profile page with a header and a profile photo. You can add stories, images, or status updates just like on Facebook, and users can leave comments, share your posts, or vote them up or down. There’s also a newsfeed, where you can see what other people you’re following have posted. You can also create your own blog or group. However, Minds is different in other ways. As one Minds user, OWNtheNWO, pointed out to me on Minds, “liking” a comment or post doesn’t weigh it in importance like it does on Facebook — they still remain strictly in chronological order. Minds also has a blog system similar to Blogspot, in which you can paywall your content. And you can exchange your Minds tokens on the Etherium blockchain for ETH, and then exchange those into whatever you wish, but the tokens aren’t worth a lot yet.

Streamzoo adds a social-gaming element to an otherwise ordinary Instagram-like photo-filtering app. Users can follow popular "#streams" with the use of a hashtag, and as their photos become more popular, they earn badges and compete against others. More social features let you share photos privately with a group of people you invite, or post your pictures to Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Tumblr and Flickr.
Users are allowed to self-censor by flagging (although flagging is discouraged), and they vote on the merits of a post through upvotes, much like you would “like” a Facebook post or upvote a Reddit submission. But the big thing that makes Steemit stand out is that you get paid for your posts in the form of Steem cryptocurrency, based on how many votes your posts get. And you also get paid based on your own curation of other people’s posts, and the upvotes that your comments on posts receive.
There’s a bit of a barrier to entry, but it’s not that tough. If you need help signing up, there’s a great beginner’s guide here. Madeline Stone, who oversees public relations for Steemit, shared some advice on getting started on Steemit with Heavy.com. She advised:  “As far as helping people who are joining Steemit for the first time, posting in the introduceyourself tag is a great way to get started — other Steemians will then comment on your post and provide resources for newbies. People can also look for help by posting questions in the #help channel at https://steem.chat/home.”
It's like twitter, but minus the stuff you don't like, and made better. It introduces instances, which are connected but are their own separate site with their own rules and moderation, It has a 500 character limit for every "toot", and most of the instances have an amazing community from what I can tell. It honestly is the best alternative to Twitter. Veencorr • Mar 2018 • 3 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Fb…just did that to me ..cut me off after a hacker hacked into my account. They’re asking for photo proof, age and my name..the list of documuments they will accept to send as proof is my ss card ..drivers licenses..things i’m not really sure i want them to see..they tell me to cover up some of the information but my address will still be visible. I even asked if this was FB. No response except they can not go future without proof..
PicPlz used to be my personal favorite, until pressure from Instagram on Android forced them to shut down. In their place though, a new challenger has risen—one with an old name. Flickr's new Android app brings most—if not all—of the same features that Instagram offers and combines them with Flickr's own photo-centric social network where your photos belong to you and no one else. Flickr's new Android app lets you take photos straight from your camera and apply filters to them if you choose, then share them with friends on Flickr, Facebook, Twitter, or anywhere else you choose.
Plenty of apps will take your photos, from Apple iCloud to Dropbox to Microsoft OneDrive, but at the moment Google Photos makes most sense for most people—not least because you can store an unlimited number of photos and videos if you let it shrink your pictures down to 16 megapixels and your clips down to 1080p (you can also pay to have everything kept at full resolution).
‘Mastodon isn’t one place and one set of rules,’ it states in their official website. It is unique as it can be used as individual instances, which are specialized versions of the platform themed by the topics of user’s interests. However, you’d need your own server for running your social media platform—whose method is widely available on the internet. Businesses and advertisers can take advantage of this and create their own social media platform on their own infrastructure. And since it is your own social media, you make your own rules.

Plurk utilizes a horizontal timeline, with messages summarized by single verbs (“feels”, “loves”, etc.). As you would expect, media files can be shared, and Plurks can be liked. Emoticons are an important element of the Plurk user experience, and your selection increases as your karma grows. Karma is based on your activity on the social networking site. Group chat and direct messaging are also featured on Plurk.
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