I just reported something really scary and vile on FB. They had their “experts” tell me it’s well within their community guidelines. It was publicly calling white extremists to prepare for a “race war.” Facebook is fine with that. I’m OUT. I need to do it gradually, so I can take some of my network with be – but this, on top of selling my information, on top of helping Russia elect Trump…Screw this platform. What works for you guys?
You may not realize this, but MySpace still exists and you can still create an account there. In fact, some people’s old MySpace accounts are still there, too. It’s not really clear if anyone’s trying MySpace again after the Facebook issues — they may be gone for good. But it might be worth checking out for nostalgia’s sake at the very least. In June, The Guardian did a story about people who still enjoy using MySpace. However, one dedicated user did say that most profiles on MySpace are abandoned. Meredith Corporation is selling the media brand Time to Salesforce’s founders, Marc and Lynne Benioff. Meredith also owns Viant, which it’s looking into selling. Since Viant owns MySpace, it’s anyone’s guess what will happen to MySpace next.

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The aptly named Hipster borrows a lot from Instagram, including the snappy photo shooting and all of the great filters you can apply to your photos. Hipster also allows you to add text captions to your photo "postcards" before sharing them, and then post your photos to Twiter, Facebook, Flickr, or Tumblr for others to see. It's fast, easy to use, and probably the simplest to get started with in the roundup.
If you work in any kind of creative field – illustration, graphic design, film, you-name-it – or just want to hang out and share content in a space designed around tasteful images and art, then you should try out Ello. It wasn’t always like this, with the social network that used to called itself a “Facebook Killer” reeling in its ambitions to something more focused and tenable.
We realize you’re likely on this list to get away from this app. However, sometimes it's unavoidable. Whenever Facebook rolls out a new feature, the official app will have it long before the third party Facebook apps. Facebook’s official suite of apps include Facebook Messenger, Facebook Groups, Facebook at Work, and Facebook Mentions (if you’re famous). They aren’t great for battery life, but they’ll always get the new features first. Facebook Messenger is also notoriously hard to use outside of the official app. Consequently, Facebook also makes Facebook Lite. It's a super light, simple, and surprisingly good alternative to its larger, battery swilling sibling.
Last year, after Twitter began moving away from a purely chronological feed, Rochko began building the back end for what would become Mastodon. Instead of building a unified service, Rochko envisioned something more like email, or RSS: a distributed system that lets you send public messages to anyone who follows you on the service. Anyone can create a server and host their own instance of Mastodon, and Mastodon works in the background to connect them. (source)
Plenty of apps will take your photos, from Apple iCloud to Dropbox to Microsoft OneDrive, but at the moment Google Photos makes most sense for most people—not least because you can store an unlimited number of photos and videos if you let it shrink your pictures down to 16 megapixels and your clips down to 1080p (you can also pay to have everything kept at full resolution).
I know that personally, I’m not too jazzed about the learning curve of some of these new options and prefer the more familiar layouts of Real.Video (Brighteon), MeWe, and Gab. But honestly, people on social media can just be so horrible that Selco Begovic and I started an old-fashioned forum that is a throw-back to the 90s/early 2000s. I like forums because they’re familiar, comfortable, and they draw likeminded people together.
Friendly for Facebook is one of the newer Facebook apps. It has a pretty decent set of features as well. That includes theming, Facebook Messenger support, the ability to customize your news feed, and more. You can also download videos from Facebook. The News Feed customization allows you to filter out things like keywords. That's a great way to get rid of nonsense you don't want to see. This is definitely among the best third party Facebook apps. The pro version unlocks some of the feature and goes for $1.99.
If you primarily use social networks for getting your daily dose of news, you have tons of options at your disposal. Digg, Flipboard, Feedly, Google News, Apple News, etc., are great options. Digg stands out among them due to its interesting curation process. From various media outlets, it provides the most important stories and videos. It’s a thumbs-up-based website and you can use it even without creating an account.
Facebook is one of the most popular social networking platforms around the world. Via using this app, you may edit the specific privacy of your status, photos and videos, you may select if you want to share them with everyone viewing your profile, or only with your friends, while you can even keep them private. Recently, this app also added an additional feature called Marketplace. The Facebook Marketplace allows its users to view, buy and sell items in their local community. By adding this feature, Facebook became one of the most relevant places not only to share photos and connect people around the world but also to do online business. This program would be the most flexible among all of the Instagram alternatives apps.
Twitterrific by the Iconfactory was the very first Twitter application for the iPhone, even predating Apple's official App Store. It is full-featured, award-winning client with a beautiful and intuitive UI. Twitterrific supports link shortening and tweet translation in addition to the ability to filter your timeline for specific tweet types and trends. It's clean and elegant and color-codes your timeline so you can see tweets, @mentions, and DMs all in the same stream.
Pickup for the app has been slow, and I'm sure this is disappointing for Polaroid, but I implore them to continue to update the app and promote this alternative take on social media. One obvious improvement would be the ability to upload Apple Live Photos to the service rather than only being able to use the in-app camera, thus limiting what you can upload to the present moment.
These decentralized networks run on open-source software, which means anyone can contribute to the software to make it better, or download the code and modify it for their own instance. The software being open source doesn’t guarantee that the code itself is any more or less secure than the proprietary software that runs private social networks, but one of the main benefits of an open source platform is that anyone who has the technical knowledge can look “under the hood” and see exactly how Mastodon or Diaspora works.

But what if consumers are ready for a new new thing? What if smaller, higher-quality, more engaged audiences can self-assemble around a brand? What if consumers are yearning for restored trust, a semblance of privacy, and true transparency? A tall order, to be sure. But if you could leverage a trusted brand to fill the bill, is the time right for the emergence of focused branded social networks? I’m pretty sure the answer is yes.
One word of warning: Many dating apps require Facebook integration to work, meaning you won't be able to use them if you delete your account. You can still create a Tinder account without Facebook, but you will loose all your current matches and conversations. Hinge and Bumble require you to have a Facebook account to sign up, though the latter company says it's working on dropping that requirement.
LocalLink is an application that allows people to find other people who share their interests and collaborate with them. LocalLink allows them to search for groups in their city and/or locality, join them, and communicate with them with ease. Made with AppInventor (and Fusion Tables at core), LocalLink is partially community - driven, and has several safety … See more

According to sources at the company, the app currently has around 22 million users (Figures accurate as of April 2017). The platform is growing, collecting big investments and extending its functions and features on a regular basis. Its basic idea is the same as Instagram’s: EyeEm is a platform made for sharing photos. Snapshots and professional images can be uploaded and then shared with the community on EyeEm and other linked networks – with a range of different filters and editing tools to add that extra star quality.
In March 2018 Vero jumped from 150,000 users to over 3,000,000 in the wake of Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica data breach. The mobile-only platform is well-designed and has some great photo management tools, which may have led to the overall alternative/artistic vibe given off by the current user base. Their privacy policy is not as strong as some others, but they do give users plenty of control and eventually plan to charge a subscription fee in order to avoid advertising, though early adopters will get a free lifetime membership. The mobile-only platform and eventual need to pay for the service may turn some off, but Vero certainly shows some potential.
All of this stuff was total catnip for me. After all, what Twitter does isn't that impressive. If anything, Twitter's made its elegant platform significantly worse over the last few years, changing the "favorite" icon, introducing a higher character count, pushing obnoxious "suggestions," and messing up the chronological timeline in favor of an algorithmically-generated one. And then there’s the user-hostile API changes that might spell doom for third-party Twitter clients. It's no wonder that even loyal users are fed up.
Not just Facebook but Twitter as well. What I see unfolding in front of my very eyes is an evolutionary process still in beta that is already much superior to both of the above. Complex but clean, fast growing yet still user friendly and last but not least, the community feels real. They talk about important things instead of pretending to be celebs. I sense an intellectual depth ib the Minds community. Cheers Minds!! AJ JPS andrew_jjps • Apr 2017 • 1 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
In the last quarter of 2017, Twitter had only 330 million users, much less than Facebook that had 2,07 billion users or Instagram that had approximately 700 million users over that same period. Despite being easy to use and a powerful tool for reaching like-minded people or potential customers for your company's products Twitter is slowly losing the reputation it once had.
@Zach Snader I actually somewhat disagree with @Lee Fuhr. I think this would be a great feature. I like Slack, but at the same time I don't. I like it because i know how to use it, but when dealing with teams and clients (especially), some people may not understand how to use Slack. I've seen it many times with people in my circles. For example courses and memberships held within Slack. Navigating the interface was too difficult for some people and they didn't know how to reply and keep a conversation in one thread. And many people complained about it. The idea isn't to compete with Slack, but to innovate and create something that caters to those who aren't necessarily Slack's ideal users.
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