Streamzoo adds a social-gaming element to an otherwise ordinary Instagram-like photo-filtering app. Users can follow popular "#streams" with the use of a hashtag, and as their photos become more popular, they earn badges and compete against others. More social features let you share photos privately with a group of people you invite, or post your pictures to Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Tumblr and Flickr.

The app supports 14 different filters, 15 photo borders, and operates a social stream much like Twitter where you can @-reply other users and follow # hashtags to see photos of specific places, topics, or events. You even get the missing-from-Instagram tilt-shift option for your shots, in rectangular, elliptical, circular, and parallel varieties. Finally, you can also edit your photos—crop them, rotate them, edit the contrast or color balance, whatever you choose. It's also available for both Android and IOS, and with the number of features it's packed with, it's surprising it's not more popular than Instagram.

It doesn't bother with a social network on the back-end (and honestly, why bother if your friends are all on Twitter or Facebook and you're going to send the photo there anyway) which we can't fault them for. The real focus of Pixlr-O-Matic is the filters, the borders, the tweaks, and all of the changes you can make to your photos. In the end, you get over 2 million different permutations and options to make your photos look just right (or all wrong, depending) before you save the finished product to your camera roll or gallery and then share it with your friends.
Not just Facebook but Twitter as well. What I see unfolding in front of my very eyes is an evolutionary process still in beta that is already much superior to both of the above. Complex but clean, fast growing yet still user friendly and last but not least, the community feels real. They talk about important things instead of pretending to be celebs. I sense an intellectual depth ib the Minds community. Cheers Minds!! AJ JPS andrew_jjps • Apr 2017 • 1 agrees and 0 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Reddit may be trying to become more of a Facebook alternative. A newer version of Reddit includes profile pages, one-to-one chat features, follow functionality, and more. Some people love this, and others think it’s a little too close to Facebook for their comfort. It should be noted that some people are leaving Reddit due to concerns about censorship, as the QAnon subreddit and related subreddits were recently banned. However, Reddit has said these sites were banned due to harassing someone on Twitter, and has also stood firm about not banning The_Donald subreddit, despite many Reddit users calling for just that.

Back in the day, pundits and thought leaders liked to ask, “Is ____ a nightclub or a public utility?” The theory is that nightclubs go in and out of style, but you’ll pay for and use the electric company’s product forever. With roughly 2.6 billion users, Facebook is clearly a utility. No digital product has ever been this size. The company has to break new ground every day just to keep from collapsing under its own weight. That said, the public sentiment combined with the political climate has created, at least in a small way, a market for alternative solutions.
Plurk features a horizontal timeline and it lets you share pictures, videos or URLs for web-based articles. The platform stimulates its users to spend more time engaging with other Plurk members through the concept of Karma, which grants you access to more emoticons. This social network can be accessed from iPhones, Android devices or from PC or Mac computers.
Then there's the killer feature: You can hide sensitive content behind a button before posting, so people don't have to see your long rant, political content, or spoiler for a new episode of a TV show. The system is designed to encourage thoughtful posting—not selfish or gratuitous posts. It's even simple to contribute descriptions of images you're posting for the visually impaired, something Twitter doesn't bother turning on by default.
There’s a bit of a barrier to entry, but it’s not that tough. If you need help signing up, there’s a great beginner’s guide here. Madeline Stone, who oversees public relations for Steemit, shared some advice on getting started on Steemit with Heavy.com. She advised:  “As far as helping people who are joining Steemit for the first time, posting in the introduceyourself tag is a great way to get started — other Steemians will then comment on your post and provide resources for newbies. People can also look for help by posting questions in the #help channel at https://steem.chat/home.”
In 2016, Facebook introduced Marketplace, a feature allowing users to buy and sell items from people in their communities. As a replacement, consider Nextdoor, an app designed to keep you in the loop about what's happening in your neighborhood. It has a free and for sale section that, like Marketplace, emphasizes local offerings, and feels less sketchy than Craigslist.
Plenty of apps will take your photos, from Apple iCloud to Dropbox to Microsoft OneDrive, but at the moment Google Photos makes most sense for most people—not least because you can store an unlimited number of photos and videos if you let it shrink your pictures down to 16 megapixels and your clips down to 1080p (you can also pay to have everything kept at full resolution).
Thanks to its distributed design and because no person owns it, it’s away from any kind of advertisement and corporate interference. After making an account, you retain the ownership of your personal data. It’s also better than Facebook for people who wish to hide their real identity as it allows pseudonyms. You can use hashtags, mentions, text formatting, etc.
Facebook is the most popular social media site on planet Earth. It has over a billion registered users, most of which are active on almost a daily basis. Unfortunately, the official Facebook app is a data using, resource hogging, battery draining catastrophe of an app that a lot of people don’t want. It’s always good to have options so we’re going to take a look at the best Facebook apps for Android. If these aren’t doing it for you, we have a second list of Facebook alternatives here that’s a little bit more in-depth! There are new Facebook apps coming down the pipes as well, but we don’t think they’re quite ready for prime time yet. That includes apps like this one.
Swipe for Facebook is one of the more powerful Facebook apps. It has a laundry list of features, including an ad blocker, Facebook Messenger support, themes, chat heads, Material Design, and support for over 30 languages. It's less resource intensive than the stock Facebook app. However, it is a little larger than something like SlimSocial. The app even includes multiple layouts that mock the stock Facebook app, Google+, and other setups. The free version has most of the basic features. A single $2.99 in-app purchase gets you the complete experience.
@Zach Snader I actually somewhat disagree with @Lee Fuhr. I think this would be a great feature. I like Slack, but at the same time I don't. I like it because i know how to use it, but when dealing with teams and clients (especially), some people may not understand how to use Slack. I've seen it many times with people in my circles. For example courses and memberships held within Slack. Navigating the interface was too difficult for some people and they didn't know how to reply and keep a conversation in one thread. And many people complained about it. The idea isn't to compete with Slack, but to innovate and create something that caters to those who aren't necessarily Slack's ideal users.
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