This is the best photo editing app you can get on the iPhone for free. It works really well and rivals Camera+ in the features department with a number of great vintage filters that will give your photos a unique look. Extra packs of filters only cost $1. Like Snapseed, it’s available on multiple platforms so you can get the same experience no matter what device you’re on.
Following local, national, and international news sources is a good place to start of course, but you can also keep an eye on relevant hashtags or create a Twitter list if you want to keep your news gathering separate from your socializing. For a boosted news experience on Twitter, connect your account to TweetDeck, where you’ve got more advanced search and filter tools.
I’d be remiss to not mention Slack or Discord here as well. Those services are good, but they are too insular to be a real threat to Twitter. You have to know someone on the inside to get in yourself, and there are so many versions/channels/servers for you to join it’s hard to keep them all straight. They can be good for you and a couple dozen (hundred) of friends to stay in touch, but it’s not great for a Twitter-style experience.
Everything has its pros and cons and so does Facebook. While Facebook has become a part of our lives and it is loved by millions, it has got its share of criticisms. It has been panned across the globe for its ever changing privacy settings, which gives Facebook total control over the information that we provide on our accounts. If you are in mood for a surprise, just compare the privacy disclaimers of Facebook from its past to present to know the difference. Facebook’s experiments with the News Feed has also not gone down too well with users. The company’s Internet.org initiative has also made sure to irk net neutrality enthusiasts. To sum it up, these are good enough reasons to need Facebook alternatives.
More and more people are wanting to leave Facebook, especially after Facebook recently deleted (or “unpublished”) more than 800 pages. On Thursday, Facebook acknowledged that it purged more than 800 Facebook accounts. They said the pages were focused on politically oriented content that violated Facebook’s spam policies. Facebook said in a blog post that it was deleting 559 pages and 251 accounts “that have consistently broken our rules against spam and coordinated inauthentic behavior.” But the problem is that many owners of those pages don’t understand why they were deleted. Some pages focused on police brutality were removed. Other deleted pages, like Anti-Media, were alternative or independent news sources. And some were pages belonging to individuals who reported on the news, like Press for Truth. It’s unclear if any of these pages will be able to get their accounts back, but many account owners have publicly said they’re not sure why they were deleted. Some lost their Twitter accounts nearly simultaneously.
It has a thumbs down, which FB users asked for but never got, instead, they got the already existent and simple to do emojis. Minds has so far been a place that I am interested in checking in on because the content is diverse in the way newsfeeds used to be before filtering. I find new content and opinions with each visit to the site and the creator is active in the community, sharing, upvoting, and updating users frequently. BadBlackSheep • Mar 2017 • 1 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Buffer is actually one of the most popular apps from this list. This is basically a social media management application, as it allows you to schedule posts and track the performance of your content on various social media channels, including Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and Google+. This app offers a simple design, and it’s a great solution if you need to schedule posts on any of the aforementioned social media channels, Facebook included, but it can also serve you as an app to check your Facebook feed, of course.
In 2016 Apple banned gab’s mobile app on its Appstore for promoting explicit adult content. This was followed by Play Store in 2017, which banned the app for violating hate speech guidelines of Google. Google further noted during its ban that the platform failed in demonstrating a minimum required level of moderation and encouraged violence. Despite all this, Gab still shelters people who are easy on hate speech and non-art nudity. That said, you’ll have to search for things that could offend you on Gab dedicatedly, or else, it is chiefly stuffed with pop culture art, memes, and fair discussions on a variety of topics. And even if you find something that’s offensive to you, like a discussion on online anonymity, you can use the scroll button and explore some memes on Trump.
It’s not exactly a secret that the official Facebook app is not battery friendly, and luckily for all of us, there are some alternatives out there. Of course, Facebook’s other official app, Facebook Lite, comes to mind, and is a good alternative, but if you’re not a fan of Facebook Lite either, and are looking for a third-party alternative, we’re here to help. In the list provided down below, you will be able to find 10 applications which can replace Facebook and Facebook Lite applications. Now, it is worth noting that all of these apps are more or less mobile site wrappers, but they’re all skinned in one way or the other, altered by the developer, so that they feel completely different. These apps have evolved quite a bit in the last couple of years, so if you’re interested in testing them out, check out the list down below, but before you do, please do not that these apps are not listed in a specific order.
Polaroid's resurrection continued in 2016 with the release of their social multimedia platform SW/NG, and I'd put it down as one of the most under-rated social mobile platforms around. Forget Instagram Boomerangs, SW/NG brings pictures to life much in the same way Live Photos does on iPhone. Using the app feels similar to Instagram with the continued scroll of your feed, but pictures move as you scroll. The app feels cleaner than Instagram, and encourages users to think differently when composing an image given that a moving subject or background is more compelling.
While deleting Facebook might feel like a step in a more private direction, it's ultimately not going to do much to change the online digital economy that profits by collecting your personal information and selling it to data brokers. Facebook collects arguably the most private information, but plenty of other popular social networking apps like Snapchat and Twitter collect your data too. That's their entire business model: When you're not paying for a product, you are the product. Even your internet-service provider is likely collecting your personal information. In fact, through its expansive ad network, Facebook even collects info from people who aren't even on the platform.
Although Vero is similar in many respects to competitors such as Facebook and Instagram (profile, structure, timeline, news feed), the platform offers some interesting unique selling points: The messages in the timeline are not pre-filtered by an algorithm, but appear in chronological order. Contacts can also be divided into four categories: 'followers', 'acquaintances', 'friends', and 'close friends'. These groups can then be selected or deselected as the target group when a post is published, so that only the desired audience is informed.
Minds is a good alternative to Twitter because it doesn't have the baggage that comes with Twitter's many moderation issues. Minds has a much better transparant policy in which the things you post are actually visible to other people. Minds is hands down the best one-on-one alternative to Twitter's functions without the amateurish censoring of dissenting opinion. stefandekkers • Mar 2017 • 10 agrees and 2 disagrees Disagree   Agree
Plenty of apps will take your photos, from Apple iCloud to Dropbox to Microsoft OneDrive, but at the moment Google Photos makes most sense for most people—not least because you can store an unlimited number of photos and videos if you let it shrink your pictures down to 16 megapixels and your clips down to 1080p (you can also pay to have everything kept at full resolution).

If you're friends with hundreds or thousands of people on Facebook, it understandably might not be worthwhile to put them all in your Gcal. In this case, it might be easiest just to take 20 minutes or so to add your close friends and family member's special days to your calendar. And really, did the annual onslaught of best wishes on Facebook add much to your life in the first place?

Before there was Instagram, there was Flickr. And for many of us, this was our first online portal to have ones photography critiqued. Similar to Instagram, Flickr is a photo sharing platform but has more effective search tools, especially online. There are similarities in following and being followed but does not have the same mass audience as Instagram. Most of the feedback, positive or otherwise, will likely come from other photographers rather than prospective clients. That being said, top Flickr talent is seldom ignored, and the platform has launched many a career in the world of fine art and conceptual photography.


I think that when using Instagram you have to let go of the "full glory" thought process, just as anyone who prints their images on a large scale would tell you that you cant see the real image on a computer screen. Instagram was designed for mobile platforms, it's geared more towards composition and story than technical perfection. One could argue that if your image relies on being seen larger and doesn't look any good on instagram, maybe your composition or story isn't strong enough. Do a google image search on "Gregory Crewdson" and look at the images as thumbnails, obviously his work is designed to be viewed on a much larger scale so you'll miss some of the subtitles, but even as thumbnails the images are strong.
The problem is that Twitter does not preserve your privacy when you Tweet. Firstly, all your connections, who you follow and what you like or retweet is used as a way of profiling you. Secondly, all information about you can be subpoenad very easily. Twister is an alternative that does preserve your privacy and distributes info in a way that isn't centralized for one person/company to give away to others. JohnFastman • Dec 2016 • 1 agrees and 1 disagrees Disagree   Agree
If you work in any kind of creative field – illustration, graphic design, film, you-name-it – or just want to hang out and share content in a space designed around tasteful images and art, then you should try out Ello. It wasn’t always like this, with the social network that used to called itself a “Facebook Killer” reeling in its ambitions to something more focused and tenable.

Puffin for Facebook is by the same developers that made Puffin Browser. This is a browser app specifically made for Facebook. It features data compression that allows you to surf Facebook while using less data and also includes a tweaked UI for more enjoyable browsing. It works better on lower-end devices on slower network connections. Those with faster connections and newer phones may have a better experience with a different app. It's completely free with no in-app purchases.

Gab.ai is a platform that is similar to Twitter. You have 300 characters with which to make your point. It has been called the Alt-Right’s social media alternative and although Gab itself doesn’t censor its users, Microsoft has threatened to take them down due to “hate speech.” A lot of folks who got banned, shadowbanned, or censored by Twitter are there.
Add Friends – Players can request friends by targeting them in game and confirming the request. The friend display name will always be the name of the character that created the friendship. Characters have a context menu option to refuse friend requests. Players can have up to 50 friends at a time. There is a 30 second delay between sending friend requests.
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