Instagram was launched back in 2010 to accommodate the photo sharing maniacs on the internet. It has set the trend to share beautiful personal and professional photos on the internet and build a following around it. What launched as a simple application to attach relatively low-resolution images has today become the platform of choice for capitalizing, branding and advertising by optimizing photo posts.
Unfortunately, while I prefer apps like EyeEm (and I'm curious to check out Steller), the real reason that Instagram works for marketing is that it's also used by people who aren't photographers. So while you might be building a decent following on flickr or 500px, it's other photographers, who probably won't be looking to hire you to shoot their campaign/wedding. If on the other hand you're looking to make a name for yourself doing workshops/training for other photographers then maybe they're a perfect place to market yourself.

One of the main features that Diaspora prides itself on is its decentralization. This is to do with its technical background: the platform consists of many different networks, known as pods. User data isn’t collected and stored centrally by the provider, instead the infrastructure is distributed by users themselves, with data carried by these so-called pods. If you have good technical know-how, you can actually operate your own pod, which essentially functions as a server. This means that you can be certain that your private data remains private and in your own hands. Less technically gifted users can use ‘open pods’ in the network instead.
The next Instagram alternative is Vero, which is an emerging social networking platform launched last 2015. The mentioned image-sharing app reportedly became the most downloaded social networking platform in 18 countries. In case you are looking for an ad-free community, this is the best choice for you. Due to popular demand for this app in other countries, it extended its “free for life” offer for every new member.

It’s incredibly hard, and involves a good deal of luck, but if something is going to be a real Twitter successor/alternative, it needs to first and foremost find a way to get a critical mass of people using it. That can be a critical mass of a Twitter sub-culture, but it needs to be some group that moves in mass. App.Net get “Tech Twitter” to move, but it failed to get more than that (or to make them actually leave Twitter), but I don’t see that happening with Micro.Blog or Mastodon yet. I don’t know how you do that, but I think that’s how you get the momentum.
Thanks to its distributed design and because no person owns it, it’s away from any kind of advertisement and corporate interference. After making an account, you retain the ownership of your personal data. It’s also better than Facebook for people who wish to hide their real identity as it allows pseudonyms. You can use hashtags, mentions, text formatting, etc.
These decentralized networks run on open-source software, which means anyone can contribute to the software to make it better, or download the code and modify it for their own instance. The software being open source doesn’t guarantee that the code itself is any more or less secure than the proprietary software that runs private social networks, but one of the main benefits of an open source platform is that anyone who has the technical knowledge can look “under the hood” and see exactly how Mastodon or Diaspora works.
External companies are also looking at reining in the data that Facebook has access to. Mozilla, which makes the Firefox web browser, has just launched a Facebook Container Extension (a downloadable plug-in) that prevents Facebook from tracking you across other websites. Other plug-ins, such as Ghostery for Google’s Chrome browser (also available for other browsers) and Facebook Disconnect 2016, offer their own tracker-blocking features.
I found it confusing to use (maybe you need to be more techy?) and was put off by the fact that I needed to log in via Twitter. Perhaps this is just so you can connect with the same people. It’s always worthwhile to look at your options. Mastodon was started by Eugen Rochko, who was fed up with the changes that Twitter was making that closely resembled the Facebook algorithms.
If you want to make your photos look great, there’s no app that I’d recommend more than Snapseed. Yes, the app has a bunch of vintage filters if you’re into that sort of thing, but there are so many ways you can edit your photos using Snapseed beyond mere filters. Selective Adjustments are a key feature that really separate Snapseed from competitors because it allows you to take complete control of your photos. There are even OS X and Windows versions of the app so you can use it on your preferred platform. Don’t let the $4.99 price tag scare you away because Snapseed for iPhone or iPad is worth every penny.

Unlike Twitter, Tumblr does not really have any hard restrictions on the users, apart from some policies preventing self-harm and suicide. A platform is an excellent place for businesses and advertisers for its visual nature. It supports photos, GIFs, Videos, audios, chats, quotes, links and everything that you can create with them as long as you do not violate its guidelines. Tumblr also provides needful tools to create interactive content that you can use for online promotion of a brand. It also features an integration with Google Analytics to track your posts’ performance.


Everything has its pros and cons and so does Facebook. While Facebook has become a part of our lives and it is loved by millions, it has got its share of criticisms. It has been panned across the globe for its ever changing privacy settings, which gives Facebook total control over the information that we provide on our accounts. If you are in mood for a surprise, just compare the privacy disclaimers of Facebook from its past to present to know the difference. Facebook’s experiments with the News Feed has also not gone down too well with users. The company’s Internet.org initiative has also made sure to irk net neutrality enthusiasts. To sum it up, these are good enough reasons to need Facebook alternatives.

Before Snapseed there was Camera+. Its photoediting features are a lot better than Instagram’s, and even though it’s not as fully featured as Snapseed, you might like it more because it’s cheaper and bit easier to use. Other than the great filters provided, the best thing about Camera+ is the ability to capture photos by setting the exposure at a different point than the focus (something most camera apps don’t let you do). For only $0.99 Camera+ might be the most cost effective Instagram alternative.
Honestly! I was thinking of leaving Twitter but what’s really the alternative? I get the news faster there than anywhere else; I have been able to pretty much choose the information I get on my timeline ( which is all in one place at the same time if I want to see it); I can block out the deplorables (yeah, I said it!)...so what is a REAL alternative? Although I would leave in a heartbeat because of the continued support of Alex Jones and his ilk...and go to what?
This platform is aiming to be the best place to show your work on your smartphone either for fun or for business, and it’s doing a pretty good job of achieving this. You can’t create galleries directly on the app, but what you can do is create them ahead of time on your computer and then have them in your pocket ready for whenever you need to show off your work.
You always have the choice to experience our sites without personalized advertising based on your web browsing activity by visiting the DAA’s Consumer Choice page, the NAI's website, and/or the EU online choices page, from each of your browsers or devices. To avoid personalized advertising based on your mobile app activity, you can install the DAA’s AppChoices app here. You can find much more information about your privacy choices in our privacy policy. You can make a Data Subject Request at any time.

Even if you choose not to have your activity tracked by third parties for advertising services, you will still see non-personalized ads on our site.

You always have the choice to experience our sites without personalized advertising based on your web browsing activity by visiting the DAA’s Consumer Choice page, the NAI's website, and/or the EU online choices page, from each of your browsers or devices. To avoid personalized advertising based on your mobile app activity, you can install the DAA’s AppChoices app here. You can find much more information about your privacy choices in our privacy policy. You can make a Data Subject Request at any time.

Even if you choose not to have your activity tracked by third parties for advertising services, you will still see non-personalized ads on our site.
There are very successful focused business-oriented social networks. LinkedIn, for example, attracts job seekers, as does Dribbble, which bills itself as the leading destination to find and showcase creative work. Work-focused networks are thriving. Which raises the question, “Would a big media brand or a big lifestyle brand have consumer permission to found and run a tightly focused social network?”
Instagram is really best known for engaging the "hipster photo" scene, an appropriate term when you consider the irony involved in retro-looking images being produced digitally. Instagram's cheesy, low-grade filter effects, which some shutterflies simply abhor, let anyone with an iPhone or Android phone turn their photos back 40 years. And who could resist that slightly fuzzy 70s haze appeal (answer: anyone with an appreciation for photography as an artform).

While deleting Facebook might feel like a step in a more private direction, it's ultimately not going to do much to change the online digital economy that profits by collecting your personal information and selling it to data brokers. Facebook collects arguably the most private information, but plenty of other popular social networking apps like Snapchat and Twitter collect your data too. That's their entire business model: When you're not paying for a product, you are the product. Even your internet-service provider is likely collecting your personal information. In fact, through its expansive ad network, Facebook even collects info from people who aren't even on the platform.

If you primarily use social networks for getting your daily dose of news, you have tons of options at your disposal. Digg, Flipboard, Feedly, Google News, Apple News, etc., are great options. Digg stands out among them due to its interesting curation process. From various media outlets, it provides the most important stories and videos. It’s a thumbs-up-based website and you can use it even without creating an account.

Honestly! I was thinking of leaving Twitter but what’s really the alternative? I get the news faster there than anywhere else; I have been able to pretty much choose the information I get on my timeline ( which is all in one place at the same time if I want to see it); I can block out the deplorables (yeah, I said it!)...so what is a REAL alternative? Although I would leave in a heartbeat because of the continued support of Alex Jones and his ilk...and go to what?
Path is an app-based platform that doesn’t work with desktop browsers, so if you’re looking for something that works with both, then this won’t be right for you. This app is designed for working with smaller, more interpersonal groups rather than hundreds and hundreds of friends. Users share updates, photos, media they’re using, books, movies, and shopping purchases.
Everything from photos and messages to mobile phone numbers of everyone in your phone. They also have all your text messages you’ve made on your cell phone! It’s crazy how much they have. And with the recent Facebookl CA scandal, people are now looking for alternatives to Facebook where privacy is respected and private information is never shared or sold to other companies or organisations.
Gab.ai is a platform that is similar to Twitter. You have 300 characters with which to make your point. It has been called the Alt-Right’s social media alternative and although Gab itself doesn’t censor its users, Microsoft has threatened to take them down due to “hate speech.” A lot of folks who got banned, shadowbanned, or censored by Twitter are there.

The recent purge and exodus from Facebook was timed quite well, considering Steemit’s recent changes that make it faster for people to join the network. David Jefferys, Business Development Manager for Steemit, said about the timing: “Steemit is open for business and the timing couldn’t be more perfect with the fragmentation and disenfranchisement pervading the major social media networks.” 
Of course, there are so many great things about Twitter. The problem is, those great things are available elsewhere. If you’re looking for positive conversation and exploration of ideas, niche, geeky interests, or a means to share music, video, or photos, the following Twitter alternatives are worth your time. Like Twitter, they all offer mobile apps, so you can stay connected 24/7.
There are over 20 different filters and borders to choose from, and you can opt to geo-tag your photos with the location where they were taken. Hipster also has a social network behind the scenes here too, and even if we don't think it's terribly useful, it's full of gorgeous photos and really intimate views of the lives of the people who use the app. Plus, it's essential for any good Instagram alternative. If you opt to join, or connect with people who are also using the app, you can look at a map of where other users near you are located and sharing their photos. Oh, and yes—this app is available for iOS and Android as well.
When it comes to searching for additional sources of income to finance the project, Ello’s creators are rather creative: they have plans to begin generating revenue through user transactions carried out on their network – so by taking a commission on CD sales, for example. One of Ello’s principles is that its users aren’t obliged to use their real names, which had previously been the case at Facebook and caused outrage. When it first started out, Ello was a closed network, only accessible through an invitation to join from a registered user. This has since been relaxed, and today Ello is available for all interested parties. Critics of the site claim that Ello can’t really be considered a true Facebook alternative because it’s lacking many of the basic functions required to compete. For example, private communication between users via a chat box function is currently not possible. Ello’s focus instead is on high-quality content for all to see, making it an excellent environment for artists and photographers. Users from creative backgrounds are often attracted by Ello’s simple, minimalistic design, leaving lots of space for user posts to shine.
If you’re not interested in manually editing your images, you can quickly improve your shots with the preset filters designed specifically for portraits, landscapes, nightlife, food and sunsets. You can also mix and match to get a custom-made look for your photographs. As well as being able to share to all the usual social media platforms, you can also link back to Instagram.
GitHub is a network for programmers, where developers can take help to develop their projects better. It provides tools for your programming needs along with codes you can fork for your own project. You can also choose to not make your code public but that requires a paid subscription. There’s also issue tracking, code reviews and more. If you would like to use something other than GitHub, there are a number of good alternatives.
We Heart It is another popular image sharing platform similar to Imgur, but its content is very feminine, primarily made of inspirational photos and quotes that appeal to young women. Instagrammers who love inspirational content might really love this app not just for the content but for connecting to very positive and inspirational users in the community too.
Facebook has been under relentless attack since the Cambridge Analytica scandal in early 2018. Broadcasters and news publishers have declared open season on Mark Zuckerberg, Sheryl Sandberg, and other senior executives at the company. And while not quite ubiquitous, #deletefacebook pops up every time there’s a story about data privacy. The EU has fined them, the US is trying to figure out how to regulate them, and the notion that free services should be absolutely free (as opposed to checking a box on a terms and conditions page that allows the free service to use your data as payment) is gaining traction.
The biggest problem with Plurk is its lack of growth. The service still lacks some quality of life features and makes it difficult to do things like search and manage multiple conversations. This means that Plurk is widely used by long-time users. Since many of those long-time users are based in Taiwan and Asia, you might feel like a stranger in a strange land.

@Corvin Adkins: I completely agree. My team and I use Podio and the internal chat is useful for general communication. And even though it integrates with Slack, I don't want my team to have to switch between apps to chat. It would be counter productive. We would love to migrate to Clickup but wouldn't be able to until it had the current features that our team is using on Podio at minimum.

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